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Mom called police after son reportedly admitted to Jessica Ridgeway's ... - Fox News

Mom called police after son reportedly admitted to Jessica Ridgeway's ... - Fox News | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
ABC NewsMom called police after son reportedly admitted to Jessica Ridgeway's ...Fox NewsSigg was arrested after police reportedly received the phone call from his mother on Tuesday night that led them to his home near Ketner Lake, about 1.5 miles...
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Criminology and Economic Theory
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Some Context On The Aaron Hernandez Conviction

Some Context On The Aaron Hernandez Conviction | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
I’ve written about crime and the NFL before, particularly on domestic violence (“The Rate of Domestic Violence Arrests Among NFL Players”). Murder arrests were also part of the data set I used, and show how Hernandez’s case fits into the broader crime rates in the NFL. Arrest rates among NFL players are likely1 well below the national rates for the comparable age group, pretty much across the board. Overall, police arrest NFL players about 14 percent as often as other 25-29 year old males, but that ratio varies widely by type of offense.
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Why Inequality Persists in America

Why Inequality Persists in America | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
In 2001, the American Political Science Association formed a Task Force on Inequality and American Democracy; a few years later, it concluded that growing economic inequality was threatening fundamental American political institutions. In 2009, Oxford University Press published both a seven-hundred-page “Handbook of Economic Inequality” and a collection of essays about the political consequences of economic inequality whose argument is its title: “The Unsustainable American State.” There’s a global version of this argument, too. “Inequality Matters,” a 2013 report by the United Nations, took the view—advanced by the economist Joseph Stiglitz in his book “The Price of Inequality”—that growing income inequality is responsible for all manner of political instability, as well as for the slowing of economic growth worldwide.

The causes of income inequality are much disputed; so are its costs. And knowing the numbers doesn’t appear to be changing anyone’s mind about what, if anything, should be done about it.

In  “The Age of Acquiescence: The Life and Death of American Resistance to Organized Wealth and Power” (Little, Brown), Steve Fraser fumes that what’s gone wrong with political discourse in America is that the left isn’t willing to blame anyone for anything anymore. 

The growth of inequality isn’t inevitable. But, insofar as Americans have been unable to adopt measures to reduce it, the numbers might seem to suggest that the problem doesn’t lie with how Americans treat one another’s kids, as lousy as that is. It lies with Congress.


Via Svend Aage Christensen
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Rescooped by Rob Duke from Stop Mass Incarceration and Wrongful Convictions
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This Is How Bad The Health Care Is In Private Prisons

This Is How Bad The Health Care Is In Private Prisons | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
A nurse who supports the strike describes abysmal conditions at the jail, including broken or dirty equipment, rushed procedures and severe understaffing.

Via Concerned Citizen
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Kimberly Maddigan's comment, April 16, 9:15 PM
While it's sad that these inmates aren't receiving good healthcare, it's also not surprising. If you were to look at different healthcare facilities across the country, you would notice that some are great facilities and some are not. With that being said, this is prison. I wouldn't even begin to expect exceptional healthcare. Just like I wouldn't expect exceptional healthcare in a poor area. But, the inmates deserve to have clean working equipment and procedures that aren't rushed. It seems that with all these health violations, not only are the prisoners at risk, but so are the nurses. Overworked staffed are more likely to make mistakes that can put themselves at risk just as much as the prisoner. Hopefully the prison will hear the nurse's concerns and realize that something needs to be done to fix this problem. It might be a long road because I'm sure that understaffing is due to not being able to hire anyone because many nurses would much rather work in a hospital setting rather than in the prison.
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Simultaneous drinking and smoking marijuana increases odds of drunk driving

Simultaneous drinking and smoking marijuana increases odds of drunk driving | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Cannabis is the most commonly used drug among adults who drink, besides tobacco, yet no study has directly compared those who use cannabis and alcohol simultaneously, or at the exact same time, versus those who use both separately and on a regular...

Via Jocelyn Stoller
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Orion Hutchin's comment, April 17, 3:43 AM
They make a good point regarding the use pot to alcohol in this article. I think that alcohol increases risk or dangers when combined with almost anything that is or could become dangerous. I think the timing of this article is political. With states allowing marijuana to be used in a recreational fashion we are seeing these studies more main stream. Both pros and cons regarding the legalization of marijuana. To be alcohol the bigger issue when combining these two substances.
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Brain scans reveal how people 'justify' killing

Brain scans reveal how people 'justify' killing | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it

A new study has thrown light on how people can become killers in certain situations, showing how brain activity varies according to whether or not killing is seen as justified.

The study, led by Monash researcher Dr Pascal Molenberghs, School of Psychological Sciences, is published in the journal Social Cognitive and Affective Neuroscience.

Participants in the study played video games in which they imagined themselves to be shooting innocent civilians (unjustified violence) or enemy soldiers (justified violence). Their brain activity was recorded via functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) while they played.

Dr Molenberghs said the results provided important insights into how people in certain situations, such as war, are able to commit extreme violence against others.


Via Alessandro Cerboni
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Courtney Thompson's comment, April 14, 10:38 PM
I think that this is a very interesting study that was conducted and I would love to read more on it for my own personal interest and for my presentation. I feel as though this is a good way to study different types of individuals. I would like to see how military with ptsd react.
Kimberly Maddigan's comment, April 16, 9:43 PM
I think that this study will be able to shed light on why people kill. It's an interesting study, and I hope they are able to look more into it as time goes on. It would be interesting to see if people with motive react differently than those who are just killing to kill. It would be interesting, if one day we could somewhat screen people to see if they are likely to be murderers or not. I'm interested to see what the future of this study holds.
Orion Hutchin's comment, April 17, 2:49 AM
The study seems interesting. However I would question it having grounds to speak to why a person killed someone. It would seem this test applies to how a person feels about he act. Not the reason why. It could help for things like PTSD
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Mother 'ashamed' at slapping son

Mother 'ashamed' at slapping son | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
A solo mother who slapped her special needs son couldn't cope with his behaviour, she told police.
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Years out of prison, but still out of work | Al Jazeera America

Years out of prison, but still out of work  | Al Jazeera America | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Ex-felons say the job market is a punishing place for the as many as 65 million people with criminal records
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Cellphone traffic tickets are way down across California, but why?

Cellphone traffic tickets are way down across California, but why? | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Tickets for illegally talking on a hand-held cellphone and texting while driving have fallen over the past three years, puzzling safety officials, police and motorists who believe these forms of distracted driving remain rampant and a growing menace on our roads.
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Couple does the unthinkable to save themselves during home invasion

Couple does the unthinkable to save themselves during home invasion | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Couple does the unthinkable to save themselves during home invasion
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Courtney Thompson's comment, April 14, 11:01 PM
This is an amazing story! One I have never heard before. I think it takes a lot of courage to switch from being a hostage afraid for your life, to wanting to help your attacker. These people obviously saw that he needed help and was crying out for it. I am glad that the couple tried to help this man as maybe this experience will change his criminal behavior. It takes a lot of strength for that couple to be there for this man and help him in a time of need. From this story I feel as though this was one of the good men that just decided to do something stupid. He was suffering and call it fate or chance but he attacked the right family as they were able to be the people he needed.
Orion Hutchin's comment, April 17, 2:43 AM
That is an amazing ending to the story, which could have ended much worse. I think the praying is the biggest part of this story. Clearly the man was of some faith and felt compassion towards the people he was holding at gunpoint. I would agree with Courtney. That the guy had something occur causing him to end up in this situation or motivating him to make this poor decision.
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Outlaw economics

Outlaw economics | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Those twiddling the fiscal dials should mull on these findings. They suggest that the benefits of a fiscal stimulus package would be lower if targeted on the basis of income: short-term largesse should be used on the wealthy, too. It also means redistribution from rich to poor may not be a one-way bet: in particular taxes on the wealthiest should be phased in slowly so they can liquidate assets rather than cut spending. And politicians betting on their Robin Hood credentials should be wary of greying voters. They may be more inclined to back the Sheriff of Nottingham.
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Rescooped by Rob Duke from End Solitary Confinement in U.S. Prisons
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Washington State’s Pathbreaking Approach to Its Most Hardened Criminals: Don’t Give Up on Them

Washington State’s Pathbreaking Approach to Its Most Hardened Criminals: Don’t Give Up on Them | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
When Bernie Warner started as a correctional counselor in the segregation unit of the Walla Walla State Penitentiary in Washington 35 years ago, the inmates he oversaw were considered lost causes. They were in solitary confinement because they were seen as the worst of the worst—irredeemable monsters with irrepressible violent...

Via Concerned Citizen
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New Details Emerge in Deadly Highway 99 Motorcycle Crash

New Details Emerge in Deadly Highway 99 Motorcycle Crash | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
SACRAMENTO- Racing home to make a court-mandated curfew - that's what CHP investigators say Christopher Liby was doing Monday night when he wrecked his motorcycle in the northbound lanes of Highway...
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Sad and pointless...

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Orion Hutchin's comment, April 13, 2:08 AM
Tragic events for the young woman. Seems like a situation where the bad boy was attractive and she ended up in a situation out of her control once on the bike. The guy already had issues and now he has just added more to it. Unfortunate ordeal.
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Carl Jung Depth Psychology: What is Jungian Analysis?

Carl Jung Depth Psychology: What is Jungian Analysis? | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
A form of therapy specializing in neurosis, aimed at bringing unconscious contents to consciousness; also called analytic therapy, based on the school of thought developed by C.G. Jung called analytical (or complex) psychology.

[Analysis] is only a means for removing the stones from the path of development, and not a method . . . of putting things into the patient that were not there before.

It is better to renounce any attempt to give direction, and simply try to throw into relief everything that the analysis brings to light, so that the patient can see it clearly and be able to draw suitable conclusions.

Anything he has not acquired himself he will not believe in the long run, and what he takes over from authority merely keeps him infantile.
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School-to-prison pipeline ignores difference between misbehavior and crime: Jarvis DeBerry

In way too many schools across America, what used to be counted as childish misbehavior, even childish defiance, gets labeled as criminality. Our children are being turned over to the police and funneled into courtrooms for doing things that wouldn't...

Via Darcy Delaproser, Jocelyn Stoller
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Orion Hutchin's comment, April 17, 3:48 AM
This is too much punishment. To me this would be classified as cruel and unusual. These are youths. They will do stupid things, some more than others. By using this method of punishment, the system is setting these kids up to fail in my opinion. Things should be taken on a case by case basis, with many of these cases not worth the tax payers time to push these kids into the court systems.
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Impossible scenarios: how do we make decisions in complexity? | Spark the Change

Impossible scenarios: how do we make decisions in complexity? | Spark the Change | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it

The General Manager (GM) of a municipal department was repeatedly getting bad press for the all-too apparent failings in maintaining city roads, drainage, sewage, and water. Continuous breakdowns in water supply, blockages in main drains and sewers were inconveniencing city residents and creating high costs in property damage. City Council was being taken to court for several cases of significant damage exacerbated by its insurer’s reluctance to settle claims promptly or on a reasonable basis.

The GM was being accused and abused by the press, the residents, his superiors, elected councilors and by his managers and staff who were taking much of the heat. He fell seriously ill.  While on sick leave the Mayor called him to discuss what he was going to do to address the growing storm of protest that was negatively affecting his chances of re-election. What did he have to say?

Up until now, his decisions were based on his lengthy experience with how to fix issues. In this new dilemma he was expected to come up with a ‘silver bullet’. But how?


Via Alessandro Cerboni
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Rescooped by Rob Duke from Inequality, Poverty, and Corruption: Effects and Solutions
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The Very Real Hardship of Unpredictable Work Schedules

The Very Real Hardship of Unpredictable Work Schedules | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
voodooangel/Flickr On Monday, New York's attorney general announced that he had sent letters to 13 major retailers inquiring about their use of "on-call scheduling," which can make workers responsible for showing up at a moment's notice, or leave...

Via Jocelyn Stoller
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Kimberly Maddigan's comment, April 16, 9:24 PM
I almost took a job that was like this, however I was lucky enough to get offered another position with more stable scheduling. It's extremely hard to find work here in Texas, and because of that I was willing to take this job with crazy hours. My hours would've been anywhere from 7am to 12am any day of the week. Sometimes I would have to travel anywhere from 30 to 80 miles. Coming from Fairbanks, that is a HUGE commute just to go to work. But, because I needed a job I would've taken it. It was a floater position, and you would work depending on different job sites needs. I think that especially in the lower 48 where it is hard to find work, business can make these unpredictable work schedules. People NEED work, and will accept whatever they can get. However, it would make more sense to me to hire enough people to do the job. This would be beneficial to the employer and the employee because the employer has enough workers to do the job, instead of too many or not enough. I think that it would put a lot of stress on an individual because they can never plan for anything.
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Is Downloading Really Stealing? The Ethics Of Digital Piracy

Is Downloading Really Stealing? The Ethics Of Digital Piracy | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Many millions of people throughout the world will illegally download the fifth season of Game of Thrones, launched this week by HBO. Legally speaking,...

Via NANCY PETERS
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The World’s 100 Most Powerful Arab Women

The World’s 100 Most Powerful Arab Women | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Welcome to CEO Middle East’s fourth annual list of the world’s most powerful Arab women — an exclusive countdown of the movers and shakers who are influencing the Arab world
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Courtney Thompson's comment, April 14, 10:34 PM
I think it is amazing that this woman decided to take her future and career into her own hands. She didn't let the strict rules of her nationality influence but instead decided to make her dreams come true. I think she is a great influence not only for Arab women but for all women.
Rob Duke's comment, April 14, 10:36 PM
Yeah, me, too. This could not have been easy to do....
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‘U Drive, U Text, U Pay’ campaign continues : Snoqualmie, WA – SnoValley Star – News, Sports, Classifieds

The SnoValley Star is the local weekly newspaper for Snoqualmie and North Bend, WA. Local news, classifieds, weather, mountain pass and contact information.
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Orion Hutchin's comment, April 13, 1:41 AM
I agree with this campaign. Taking peoples money is teaching them to not do it again. It would definitely get my attention, because money matters to me and to most. However I feel it would be difficult to prove this charge. What if I am looking down at my phone to change the song because I have blue tooth that lets me play the music from my phone. The rule is a good idea to train us not to text or face the fine. However it probably has issues.
Courtney Thompson's comment, April 14, 10:54 PM
I think that this is a brilliant campaign. Distracted drivers are just as bad if not worse than drunk drivers. Driving while texting or on the phone in a car is one thing but doing it on a motorcycle is a completely idiotic. Balance, some precision and focus is needed in driving a motorcycle. Becoming distracted is how you kill yourself or someone else.
Rescooped by Rob Duke from First Nations
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Another International Call for Inquiry Into Murdered and Missing Indigenous Women in Canada

Another International Call for Inquiry Into Murdered and Missing Indigenous Women in Canada | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
United Nations CEDAW calls Canada's lack of a national inquiry into missing and murdered aboriginal women a violation of human rights.

Via Terrance H BoothSr
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Rescooped by Rob Duke from Inequality, Poverty, and Corruption: Effects and Solutions
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Why America hates its poor

Why America hates its poor | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
I grew up walking in the road instead of on the sidewalk. We lived in a trailer park inconveniently situated over the highway that divided our conservative Ohio town, and the sidewalk was raised much higher than the road, by a good three feet. The added elevation made you easily visible to the passing cars below, and I didn’t want them to see me in my thrift store jeans and hand-me-down sweaters, which were usually about two sizes too big. But more than that, I feared the thought of being associated with my own neighborhood, a place where the local government came to drop off welfare lunches to us every day, white bread bologna sandwiches with a side of fruit cocktail.

Famed economist Milton Friedman once promised that there’s no such thing as a free lunch, and he was right. In high school, we moved to a neighboring home after my mother’s divorce, a dilapidated old shack of a trailer with a caved in roof that leaked everywhere when it stormed. Our pots spent more time collecting rust-colored summer rain than they did on our stove. The previous occupant’s husband died in the front room, and she left the chair for us as a souvenir. When I invited friends over to my house, I could tell they were as embarrassed by my address as I was, even when we were too shy to say why.

Via Jocelyn Stoller
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Rescooped by Rob Duke from Bounded Rationality and Beyond
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Belief in a zero-sum game: Scientists develop a new way to compare individuals and cultures - PsyPost

Belief in a zero-sum game: Scientists develop a new way to compare individuals and cultures - PsyPost | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
We rely on fundamental theories about the social world and how it works to guide our behavior in everyday life. These generalized beliefs about ourselves, ...

Via Alessandro Cerboni
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Should Prosecutors Be Forced to Have Their Plea Bargains Approved by Juries?

Should Prosecutors Be Forced to Have Their Plea Bargains Approved by Juries? | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
One of the most reliably shocking facts about the American justice system is that 97 percent of criminal convictions are the result of plea bargain negotiations—and that jury trials, which many people think of as our society’s primary vehicle for determining a defendant’s guilt or innocence, have become vanishingly rare....

Via Concerned Citizen
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ug! What a choice? Juries of folks who know nothing about justice theory; or prosecutors/judges who are blown by the winds of politics?
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Concerned Citizen's curator insight, April 10, 9:04 AM

Hell Yes, to many prosecutors are convicting innocents, yet people wonder why the the explosion of mass incarceration? Maybe if prosecutors had some over site? The mass incarceration would not be the question here. The world is watching and finally awake of the real problem, An exoneration happens daily in the US. That alone tells you their has to be some accountability on prosecutors that are running the whole damn legal system at the expense of innocent lives .Even the judges are run by prosecutors so no one stands a snow balls chance in hell of getting justice until there is some over site on those rogue prosecutors.

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Better Data Entry Could Help Stop Rapists Like Darren Sharper Before They Assault More Women

Better Data Entry Could Help Stop Rapists Like Darren Sharper Before They Assault More Women | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Why didn't police move more quickly to arrest Darren Sharper, the former New Orleans Saints safety who has reached a plea agreement to settle rape charges involving at least nine women in four stat...
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