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Prop 36: Yes, because it improves ‘three strikes’ law

Prop 36: Yes, because it improves ‘three strikes’ law | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Our laws shouldn’t put us into exorbitant debt or restrict smart re-entry programs for repeat offenders.
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Banned in Pakistan: A Muslim Porn Star’s Sexual Crusade

Banned in Pakistan: A Muslim Porn Star’s Sexual Crusade | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Pakistani-American adult film star Nadia Ali is famous for wearing a hijab in her porn films. She says she’s challenging how the veil suppresses women’s sexuality.
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Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia Dead at Age 79

Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia Dead at Age 79 | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia, known for his fiery comments on and off the bench, has died at age 79.
Rob Duke's insight:

This will be interesting...

Who will the President appoint?  Bill Clinton?  Eric Holder?

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Banning the burqa

Banning the burqa | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
LAST June, a few months after Chadian forces had crossed into Nigeria to fight the Islamist insurgents of Boko Haram, two suicide-bombers detonated their belts in N’Djamena, Chad’s capital, killing more than 30 people. Two days later Chad’s government banned the wearing of the burqa, the Muslim woman’s covering that hides even the eyes. Henceforth, said the prime minister, security forces could “go into the markets… seize all the burqas on sale and burn them”. Those spotted in such “camouflage” would be “arrested, tried and sentenced after summary proceedings.” Heavy-handed as that sounds, several other sub-Saharan governments have followed suit. A month after Chad’s ban, Cameroon did the same in its northernmost region following suicide-bombings by people clad in burqas. Now the ban has been extended to five of Cameroon’s ten provinces, including its two biggest cities. Niger’s government has banned the garment in Diffa, a southern region that has also been hit by Boko Haram. And late last year Nigeria’s President Muhammadu Buhari, a Muslim, said that a ban even on the hijab, which shrouds a woman’s head and chest but leaves her face on show, may be necessary if bombings persist.

Even countries unharmed by Islamist terror are banning the burqa. Last year Congo-Brazzaville barred it in public places to “prevent any act of terrorism”. And Senegal, which the French security service says is vulnerable to an attack, is pondering a ban, too. Only one west African country seems to be moving in the other direction. The Gambia’s eccentric dictator, Yahya Jammeh, who recently declared his nation to be Islamic, told all female government workers to cover their hair.
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How lessons from Christopher Dorner manhunt helped police during San Bernardino terrorist attack

How lessons from Christopher Dorner manhunt helped police during San Bernardino terrorist attack | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
SAN BERNARDINO >> When fired Los Angeles police officer Christopher Dorner went on his killing spree it drew the largest law enforcement response in San Bernardino County history — until the
Rob Duke's insight:

Great place to learn to be a cop.  My home department (Redlands) from 1988 to 1996....

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NYPD Cop Convicted of Manslaughter in Stairwell Shooting

NYPD Cop Convicted of Manslaughter in Stairwell Shooting | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
A rookie police officer who shot an unarmed man dead in a darkened public housing stairwell was convicted Thursday of manslaughter in a case closely watched by advocates for police accountability.
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Brandal Nicole Crenshaw's comment, February 12, 9:35 PM
This is sad and shows why we need more training with our officers. I feel sorry for him, but I also think that it is the right call- especially if there was no true threat. In a time were we are having to watch our cops so closely (out of media provoked fear, even) it really supports the discussion for more training and more options.
clarence kalistook's comment, February 13, 12:53 AM
It sounds like this cop did not know how to handle his gun safely. It all comes down to training. I have been using guns since I shot my first ptarmagin at 6 years old. If you grow up using guns and respecting them as dangerous, you learn a lot. Perhaps police officers in training should get extra training if they haven'y used guns before. It actually is pretty rare for a gun to just "go off".
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Celebrated hunter crushed to death by baby elephant

Celebrated hunter crushed to death by baby elephant | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
A celebrated Texas-born hunter was crushed to death by a baby elephant in Zimbabwe as he tried to measure its ivory tusks for an American client.

Ian Gibson, 55, was a lauded figure among U.S. safari enthusiasts, who would commission him to slaughter prized animals near his home in South Africa.

On Wednesday, he was tentatively approaching the young bull elephant in Zimbabwe's Zambezi Valley when the animal charged, and knelt on Gibson until he died.
Rob Duke's insight:

This is specific deterrence.  No one else may learn from this, but Gibson will never traffic in ivory again....

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Ashley von Borstel's comment, February 12, 12:43 AM
I agree, he knew the risks. Honestly, I don't feel bad for him. It's cruel to hunt animals for prizes. Too bad other hunters will probably not look at his death as a warning.
Miranda Kay Grieser's comment, February 12, 1:53 AM
I’ve never have been a fan of hunting. So the fact that this happened to him does not make me extremely sad. I think that this was Karma’s way of finally getting back to him for hunting so many animals. I know that his hunting was legal, but I am not even a fan of hunting deer. I get that we need meat to survive, but there is no reason to hunt exotic animals.
clarence kalistook's comment, February 13, 12:51 AM
I thought everyone knew you aren't supposed to kill elephants for their tusks. This Ian Gibson had absolutely no repect for the animal and the animal sensed it. Elephants are smart. The elephant killed him in self defense. I hope they did not punish the poor elephant for his actions.
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Fear of Vengeful Gods Helped Societies Expand : DNews

Fear of Vengeful Gods Helped Societies Expand : DNews | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Religiosity may contribute to greater cooperation and collaboration despite geographic separation.
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Miranda Kay Grieser's comment, February 12, 2:00 AM
I am not extremely religious, so this article was a little hard to follow. I can’t really understand how people can make such life decisions based on higher religious powers that you never see. I think I am a person that has to see it or experience it to believe it. If some God were to make contact with me, I think I wouldn’t be so skeptical about what people do for their religion.
Kristen Speyerer's curator insight, February 12, 10:44 PM

The results of this research appear to align with conventional wisdom concerning human evolution and the creation of modern societies. I have often heard people call religion a “security blanket”. This intuitively rings true. Early humans formed groups, beyond the family, in order to further survival in a harsh world. The expansion of tribalism resulted in the establishment of behavioral expectations and moral codes. Member of the tribe would adhere to this code, as it was necessary in order to maintain peace in harmony within the tribe.  I also believe religion is a natural response to the formation of pre-modern society. I wonder if religion is born from an innate desire for justice.  

clarence kalistook's comment, February 13, 1:09 AM
Religion results in greater cooperation of humans. This makes sense when considering developing societies because they need to get organized to accomplish projects. Also believing in a higher being watching over you makes you behave better, even when no-one is watching. But in modern times with so many religions in the world, this idea may not apply. Arabs and Jews will never stop fighting over their differences and this is not good for the earth's people. We don't know how much destruction the world's religions will cause.
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The right way to do drugs

The right way to do drugs | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
States can tax users to deter consumption—though not so much as to make consumers turn first to the untaxed black market. The “right” level of tax will depend on a country’s circumstances. In Latin America, where abuse is rare and the black market is bloody and powerful, governments should keep prices low. In the rich world, where problem use is more common and drug-dealers are a nuisance rather than a threat to national security, prices could be higher. One model is the United States after Prohibition: alcohol taxes were set low at first, to drive out the bootleggers; later, with the Mafia gone, they were ramped up.

A similar trade-off applies when determining what products to allow. Cannabis no longer means just joints. Legal entrepreneurs have cooked up pot-laced food and drink, reaching customers who might have avoided smoking the stuff. Ultra-strong “concentrates” are on offer to be inhaled or swallowed. Edibles and stronger strains help put the illegal dealers out of business, but they also risk encouraging more people to take the drug, and in stronger forms. The starting-point should be to legalise only what is already available on the black market. That would mean capping or taxing potency, much as spirits are taxed more steeply and are less available than beer. Again, the mix will vary. Europe may be able to ban concentrates. America already has a taste for them. If the product were outlawed there the mob would gladly step in.

In one respect, governments should be decidedly illiberal. Advertising is largely absent in the underworld, but in the legal world it could stimulate vast new demand. It should be banned. Likewise, alluring packaging and products, such as cannabis sweets that would appeal to children, should be outlawed, just as many countries outlaw flavoured cigarettes and alcohol-spiked sweets. The state should use the tax system and public education to promote the least harmful ways of getting high. The legal market has already created pot’s answer to the e-cigarette, which reduces the damage done by smoke to lungs.
Rob Duke's insight:

This is a balanced plan that Alaska should adopt....

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mlsoden's comment, February 11, 12:43 PM
Being in law enforcement I am often surprised with the level of resistance to legalizing marijuana or other drugs. Alcohol is legal and causes as many health issues as any currently illicit or prescription drugs, yet there is not talk of outlawing alcohol. Many of the issues that arise around drugs occur because of their illicit or socially stigmatizing aspects. Crime, abuse and other issues could be addressed with aggressive, focused regulation. If Alaska continues on the path of legalization there needs to be tightly worded, and well funded regulation in order to make the transition successful.
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94 year old former Auschwitz guard goes on trial in Germany

94 year old former Auschwitz guard goes on trial in Germany | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
DETMOLD, Germany (AP) — A 94-year-old former Auschwitz guard is going on trial on 170,000 counts of accessory to murder in western Germany, accused of serving in the death camp at a time when hundreds of thousands of Hungarian Jews were gassed.
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Austyn Hewitt's comment, February 11, 5:15 PM
I had no idea there were even cases still going on involving the Holocaust. Should the men whom were apart of Auschwitz and the killing of the Jews be punished for their crimes? Yes, but what will happen with a 94 year old man who is found guilty? If he is even found guilty. At most this man has six years to live. Should he go and die in jail? Or is he to old and should live out the rest of his life like he has been for so many years?
Ashley von Borstel's comment, February 12, 12:48 AM
He may be old, but that doesn't mean he should be released from his crimes. There are still survives from the Holocaust and they want justice. Even if it's small justice, they want some sort of relief.
Kristen Speyerer's curator insight, February 13, 6:45 AM

The Demjanjuk case is a good example of how nations can come together in order to fight international crime. Demjanjuk was accused of crimes against humanity, which is both internationally recognized crime and has been codified into international law. As violations of international crime are described as  crimes against all of mankind, the perpetrators of such crimes can be tried by any country; this is the principle of “universal jurisdiction”.  As a result, Demjanjuk was subject to extradition to Israel to stand trial. He was later released and returned to the U.S., only to be extradited to Germany twenty years later, where he was convicted.


I believe prosecuting former Nazis like Hanning serves two purposes: first, it sends a very clear message: the international community will not allow people to get away with crimes like genocide and mass murder just because they have managed to evade justice for so long,--you don’t get a free pass--, and finally, it brings attention to the Holocaust, which may help prevent such crimes from happening again. 

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Oregon standoff: FBI surrounds occupiers at wildlife refuge - CNN.com

Oregon standoff: FBI surrounds occupiers at wildlife refuge - CNN.com | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
The armed protesters occupying a wildlife refuge in Oregon have been surrounded, the FBI said on Wednesday.
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She Leaves A Note In The Glove Box In Case Her Car Was Stolen, And It's Quickly Going Viral!

She Leaves A Note In The Glove Box In Case Her Car Was Stolen, And It's Quickly Going Viral! | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
This note actually worked.
Rob Duke's insight:

This is a sign of the vast amount of crime that goes unreported.  Much of the remedies of the world are ad hoc and don't involve the police (either because we're just too busy...or we make people feel unworthy...or the bureaucracy is too expensive)....

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Courtney Antilla's comment, February 11, 8:47 PM
I always wondered if notes like this worked or not. But it does show how much crime is unreported. I personally would not be able to keep the promise of leaving police out of it. If my car was stolen I would be calling the police right away. Different mindsets for different people though.
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Jury selection starts for sex assault trial of former UAF hockey player

Jury selection starts for sex assault trial of former UAF hockey player | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
FAIRBANKS — Jury selection began Monday in the trial of Nolan Christopher Youngmun, a former University of Alaska hockey player accused of raping a fellow student last spring.
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Christa Lynch's comment, February 9, 3:51 PM
Unfortunately this young man was already perceived guilty in public opinion (not saying he is or isn't). Some people feel that his father's influence has protected him. Sexual assault is a major issue on campuses across the nation. Not to mention the fact that he was an athlete for UAF. I think some of this young man's statements are interesting, first he didn't have sex with one girl, then if he did, he doesn't remember. Was he too drunk to realize the consequences of his actions, or is he a serial sexual offender? Either way, there are multiple young lives ruined from this and at least it was reported.
William Estrin's comment, February 9, 5:32 PM
Rapes at universities has always been a very sore subject with me. I strongly believe it is an issue that is severely under-reported and overlooked. I believe that is happens way more than the public knows or realizes. It angers me, because I know the reasons behind this. Universities in this country are money-hungry businesses like any other and they care more about protecting their own reputations than ensuring justice for students that have been victims of a horribly traumatic, violent crime. I believe when a student reports a rape to the university, most of the time, the university lies to and manipulates the victim into taking a course of action that would be more beneficial to the university. The university does not want it to get out that there was a rape on their campus, because that would bring it bad publicity and in turn less profits. Many times, the university convinces the student to take a course of action that is vastly disproportional to the seriousness of the crime. And the university lies through their teeth. Rape is a violent first degree felony that deserves to be punished with a lengthy prison sentence, not a semester of academic probation! Rape is a 1st degree felony, not a university infraction! It angers me that universities lie and manipulate traumatized victims of rape in order to keep keep their pockets full. That is why I believe that anyone who is a victim of sexual assault on a college campus should ALWAYS go straight to the city police and not the university. Just based on what I read in this story, it sounds like he's undeniably guilty and he should get the prison sentence he deserves. Remember - Rape is a violent felony, NOT a simple university infraction and don't let anyone tell you otherwise.
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What School Suspensions and the Achievement Gap Have in Common

What School Suspensions and the Achievement Gap Have in Common | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
A new study shows how much racial discrepancies in classroom discipline contribute to the achievement gap.
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'Bay Boys' surfer gang cannot block access to upscale beach, Coastal Commission says

'Bay Boys' surfer gang cannot block access to upscale beach, Coastal Commission says | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
In a letter to Palos Verdes Estates officials, Jordan Sanchez, one of the agency's enforcement officers, wrote that the Bay Boys are so entrenched in this beautiful notch of California coastline that they are subject to the commission's watchdog regulations and permitting processes.

The letter says: "Precluding full public use of the coastline at Palos Verdes Estates, including the waters of Lunada Bay, whether through physical devices ... or impediments, such as threatening behavior intended to discourage public use of the coastline, represents a change of access to water, and, thus, constitutes development."

Sanchez's letter was followed by planning for a meeting with city leaders to discuss stepped-up plans for criminal and code enforcement needed to rid the coast of the Bay Boys' obstruction of access.
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GCI apologizes after exec posts ‘insensitive’ comment on KTVA story

GCI apologizes after exec posts ‘insensitive’ comment on KTVA story | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it

Duncan Whitney, a vice president at GCI -- which owns the Anchorage TV station -- commented Thursday night on a story about a traveler who drove all the way from Chile to Alaska in a Volkswagen bus. The traveler then flew to London to apply for a tourist visa to stay longer in the U.S., but was denied, KTVA reported.

“Got a hint for him,” Whitney commented. “Go to Mexico, cross the border illegally and Obama will not only let him in, but will offer to fund the rest of his trip with taxpayer dollars and provide him free health care to boot!”

When Whitney posted the comment, his Facebook profile information identifying him as a vice president of GCI showed up alongside the comment. The GCI reference was later removed from his profile. 

People reacted on both Facebook and Twitter, calling Whitney an “unashamed bigot,” ignorant and a racist, among other things.

Rob Duke's insight:

First: let me be clear: I think it's impossible to stop immigration when one country is war torn, economically depressed or experiencing famine.  But, having said that, what this person expressed isn't insensitive or racist: it's political.  

We're forgetting our history here and beginning to suppress people for expressing opinions and positions related to competition for scarce resources.  Furthermore, he's engaging in sarcastic satire, long accepted as a form of political speech.

Not since Daniel Defoe was imprisoned after the Glorious Revolution have we seen such rabid suppression of legitimate speech.  The story there was that the English parliament (House of Commons) had passed a Licensing Act in 1695 that required all printing to submit to government censors who might engage in "prior restraint" and prohibit the printing.  When the act expired, there was almost immediately a crisis (there were always crisis at this time with the question of whether or not Catholicism would come to power again in England) over a feared invasion from France (Catholic king) through Kent on the southern coast of England.  The people of Kent sent a 5 member coalition to parliament with the "Kent Petition" asking for an army to be raised (England was a bit put off by armies since the New Model Army under Oliver Cromwell had staged a civil war and military protectorate in the recent past).  Though the practice of "prior restraint" was no longer practiced, the Law of Sedition Libel remained in law, thus Parliament declared the petition as seditious and arrested the Kent 5.

Daniel Defoe (Robinson Crusoe, Moll Flanders, etc.) wrote a famous poem "Legion's Memorial" (1701) with the famous line: "our name is legion and we are many".

Defoe continues to write many political pamphlets, sometimes using direct argument, at other times arguing the opposite point from a sarcastic voice or through the use of hyperbole:

1. Original Power of the Collective Body of the People of England, Examined and Asserted, 1702.

2. The Shortest-Way with the Dissenters: or Proposals for the Establishment of the Church, 1702.  (For which he was also arrest for sedition.  This is the time period in Newgate Prison leading to some of the inspiration for Moll Flanders.A Hymn to the Pillory. 1703.


Defoe continues to write political and economic commentary for the rest of his life...having set up important arguments for what type of speech should be restrained....
 
It's disappointing to see America stoop to the level where people fear for their employment and thus won't express political speech and expression.
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Rob Duke's curator insight, February 13, 2:57 PM

First: let me be clear: I think it's impossible to stop immigration when one country is war torn, economically depressed or experiencing famine.  But, having said that, what this person expressed isn't insensitive or racist: it's political.  

We're forgetting our history here and beginning to suppress people for expressing opinions and positions related to competition for scarce resources.  Furthermore, he's engaging in sarcastic satire, long accepted as a form of political speech.

Not since Daniel Defoe was imprisoned after the Glorious Revolution have we seen such rabid suppression of legitimate speech.  The story there was that the English parliament (House of Commons) had passed a Licensing Act in 1695 that required all printing to submit to government censors who might engage in "prior restraint" and prohibit the printing.  When the act expired, there was almost immediately a crisis (there were always crisis at this time with the question of whether or not Catholicism would come to power again in England) over a feared invasion from France (Catholic king) through Kent on the southern coast of England.  The people of Kent sent a 5 member coalition to parliament with the "Kent Petition" asking for an army to be raised (England was a bit put off by armies since the New Model Army under Oliver Cromwell had staged a civil war and military protectorate in the recent past).  Though the practice of "prior restraint" was no longer practiced, the Law of Sedition Libel remained in law, thus Parliament declared the petition as seditious and arrested the Kent 5.

Daniel Defoe (Robinson Crusoe, Moll Flanders, etc.) wrote a famous poem "Legion's Memorial" (1701) with the famous line: "our name is legion and we are many".

Defoe continues to write many political pamphlets, sometimes using direct argument, at other times arguing the opposite point from a sarcastic voice or through the use of hyperbole:

Original Power of the Collective Body of the People of England, Examined and Asserted, 1702.The Shortest-Way with the Dissenters: or Proposals for the Establishment of the Church, 1702.  (For which he was also arrest for sedition.  This is the time period in Newgate Prison leading to some of the inspiration for Moll Flanders.A Hymn to the Pillory. 1703.

Defoe continues to write political and economic commentary for the rest of his life...having set up important arguments for what type of speech should be restrained....
 
It's disappointing to see America stoop to the level where people fear for their employment and thus won't express political speech and expression.
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A Parthian shot

A Parthian shot | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Previous research had found such Neanderthal DNA to be especially common near parts of the genome associated with illnesses like depression, heart disease and seborrheic keratosis, a complaint in which scaly lumps form on a sufferer’s skin. Because Dr Simonti’s data included people who actually suffer from such conditions, she was able to check those associations. When she did so, she found that particular chunks of Neanderthal DNA were indeed correlated with the presence of all three complaints. And the team found a clutch of other phenomena for which Neanderthal genes seemed to put their carriers at additional risk. These ranged from obesity and blood-clotting disorders to certain types of malnutrition, and even smoking.

At first blush this seems to suggest Neanderthal DNA is a curse. But that is almost certainly not the case. Forty millennia is plenty of time for evolution to get to work. This means that unfavourable traits should have been weeded out, while beneficial ones spread. There is evidence of exactly this. Some parts of the human genome are unusually free from Neanderthal influence, suggesting natural selection has removed harmful genes. Other parts, where Neanderthal DNA presumably offers benefits, are full of the stuff.

And just because something is bad for modern humans does not necessarily mean it was bad for their hunting-and-gathering ancestors. Some genes might put their bearers at risk of obesity in the modern world of fatty, sugary snacks. But in a world where food is scarce (as it presumably was in the northern latitudes where modern humans and Neanderthals mixed), those same genes might help their owners through lean periods.
Rob Duke's insight:

Reminds me of all those Far Side cavemen comics....

http://cdn2-b.examiner.com/sites/default/files/styles/image_content_width/hash/3e/fa/3efaf06b35cbb15e9533954d34680e35.jpg?itok=zegVPhU3

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Video: Mother of Columbine Shooter Breaks Her Silence

Seventeen years later, Sue Klebold talks about what she missed, the victims and their loved ones, and how she hopes to prevent future tragedies at schools.
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Charles Marble's comment, February 13, 6:49 AM
What a powerful interview and story this is. As horrifying as it would be to see this happening as the parent of a victim, how much more of a burden do the parents of the shooters carry with them? I think that this is one of the worst nightmares of any parent, to do the best job you can raising your child and then for them to go out and commit an unimaginable act like this. I am looking forward to seeing the entire interview and how the mother was/is able to deal with all that has happened since that day.
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Can private security teams make downtown Anchorage safer?

Can private security teams make downtown Anchorage safer? | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Two downtown agencies are working to combine security forces and expand private security communications across downtown Anchorage, in hopes it maker it safer and more pleasant for visitors and businesses. 
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Kristen Speyerer's curator insight, February 12, 8:50 PM

After reading this article, I was left wondering: what’s the goal here? To be sure, collaboration and resource sharing between the parking authority and private security companies will allow a quicker response time. However, private security personnel do not have the same level of training and accountability as do public law enforcement, and I’m worried this could easily lead to harassment and abuse of an already extremely vulnerable population.  Let’s make no mistake about it, these so-called “ambassadors” are just security guards, and their primary duty is to protect the security of private buildings and property.  One of the individuals interviewed for this article said, “The ambassador’s position is to come at it from an angle of love”. But, how does one reconcile this goal with their actual job description? I doubt the businesses employing these security guards are concerned with getting these people the help they need, and the article didn’t give specifics, stating that this is an “evolving plan”. As a practical matter, security guards are mostly on foot, and aren’t likely to have the resources available to transport these people to a shelter or mental health facility. So, what’s really going on here? To me, the answer is obvious: business owners don’t want the homeless to affect the bottom line. 

Brandal Nicole Crenshaw's comment, February 12, 9:33 PM
I am a little nervous about this, personally. We do not know the level of training that these security guards have, or their ethics involved. Mind you, I don't have anything against them personally- they could be just as good as cops- but the thing is they are not cops. One of the reasons that our justice system works is because we do not have it being freelanced to other agencies. I just don't see this working at the same level.
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A law to strip dual-citizen terrorists of French nationality moves a step forward

A law to strip dual-citizen terrorists of French nationality moves a step forward | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
The amendment is still far from passing into law. Devised by a Socialist government, the bill now has to go to the Senate, where the centre-right holds a majority. Even if it clears parliament, the real test lies later on: the French constitution cannot be changed without the approval of three-fifths of votes at a joint sitting of the lower and upper houses, which would take place in Versailles.

Judging by yesterday’s vote, President François Hollande, already the most unpopular president in modern France, may have real difficulty obtaining this. The vote split both the ruling Socialists and the centre-right opposition. Fully 119 of the 287 Socialists deputies either voted against, or abstained. On the centre-right, despite a call from Nicolas Sarkozy, leader of the opposition Republican party, to back the bill, 74 deputies voted against. Among them was Mr Sarkozy’s former prime minister, François Fillon, who has denounced the proposal as political posturing and constitutional “DIY”.

In an effort to appeal to public opinion, which broadly supports the nationality-stripping proposal, Mr Hollande has invited himself to appear simultaneously on both main French network television news shows on Thursday evening. This will also give him a chance to explain the government reshuffle, which took place on Thursday following the departure of Laurent Fabius, the foreign minister. After nearly four years in the job, and a successful global climate deal on his watch, Mr Fabius quit on Wednesday in order to preside over the country’s constitutional council, its highest court. He has been replaced, unexpectedly, by Jean-Marc Ayrault, Mr Hollande’s (German-speaking) former prime minister.

Perhaps the most arresting aspect of the debate is not that nationality-stripping is so controversial, but that the government’s other counter-terrorism measures have raised so few eyebrows. France, it is sometimes forgotten, has been living under a state of emergency since November 13th. This expires on February 26th, but is expected to be renewed after another parliamentary vote. It grants the police sweeping powers to make house arrests and raid premises without prior judicial authorisation. It has largely fallen to outsiders, such as Nils Muiznieks, human-rights commissioner at the Council of Europe, to deplore the constraints this imposes on individual liberties.

A separate police bill now going through parliament, which would grant the security forces extra powers such as the right to use firearms in situations other than self-defence, has also stirred little unease. Next to the outrage over the nationality-stripping proposal, the contrast is striking. The French public seems to have an unusually high tolerance of intrusive police and intelligence powers, and of government proposals to tighten them further still. And the French left in particular is vexed by any threat to the principle of equality, but rather less, it seems, when liberty is at stake.
Rob Duke's insight:

For the Comparative folks: some insight into the French system....

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The world’s most violent cities

The world’s most violent cities | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Four US cities feature in an otherwise—almost exclusively—Latin American list of the world's most murderous
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Police chief hopes life-size cutouts in Wal-Mart make thieves think twice about shoplifting

Police chief hopes life-size cutouts in Wal-Mart make thieves think twice about shoplifting | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
FAIRBANKS—In a novel attempt to deter shoplifters, Fairbanks police have outfitted each entrance at the Fairbanks Wal-Mart store with a life-sized cardboard cutout of an actual FPD officer.
Rob Duke's insight:

Deterrence Theory anyone?

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Ashley von Borstel's comment, February 12, 12:51 AM
They probably won't work. If anything, it might increase people shoplifting so they 'can prove the police wrong.'
Brandal Nicole Crenshaw's comment, February 12, 9:38 PM
It is an interesting idea and really shows deterrence theory, but I do not know how effective this will actually be. As people have mentioned before, there are numerous reasons that this won't work. Then again, though, those cardboard police cars always give me a heart attack.
Charles Marble's comment, February 13, 5:36 AM
I really like this idea and think that while it will not do much to drop the overall statistics of shoplifting, it will still have some of those potential shoplifters think twice about stealing something. I view this as a message to everyone from the store that there are eyes on us in the store. Maybe it works, maybe not, but at least someone is trying to do something positive for their store and the community.
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Female suicide bombers kill over 60 people in northeast Nigeria: officials

Female suicide bombers kill over 60 people in northeast Nigeria: officials | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Two female suicide bombers killed more than 60 people at a camp for people displaced by an insurgency of the jihadist Boko Haram group in the northeast Nigerian town of Dikwa, military and emergency officials said on Wednesday.
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Miranda Kay Grieser's comment, February 12, 2:13 AM
I think it is crazy that there are now female suicide bombers willing to kill hundreds of people. The fact that people can even do this astonishes me because that is such an inhumane thing for someone to do in general. I cannot believe that there are religions that push to kill innocent human beings, it just doesn’t make sense to me at all. I don’t think it’s right that I have to be scared of my own kind. We are not cannibals, that is not how we should be raised to treat one another, no matter what our religion is.
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A lottery to lose

A lottery to lose | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Louisiana’s scheme, brought in by a conservative governor, added a feature that ought to delight progressives: a lottery to assign the vouchers. In 2014 12,000 students from low-income families applied for more than 6,000 vouchers to attend 126 private schools. Lotteries are loved by social scientists because the winners and losers, distinguished by chance alone, are statistically identical. That means differences in outcomes can reasonably be attributed to the programme rather than, say, differences in family circumstances.

It turned out that this was a lottery to lose. The three economists found that those who received vouchers and moved to private schools had worse test scores in maths, reading, science and social studies than those who missed out. Hunting for an explanation, they wondered whether the weakest private schools had mopped up voucher pupils to fill their seats. But this hypothesis did not stand up.
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Vas es los?  What happened?

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These are the books students at the top US colleges are required to read

 prThe leaders of tomorrow will be well versed in dead philosophers, according to a new database of college syllabi. The Open Syllabus Project, a collection of over 1 million curricula from English-language colleges and universities over the past 15 years, released its data on Friday (Jan. 22). Plato, Hobbes, Machiavelli, and Aristotle overwhelmingly dominate lists in the US,...

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A pretty good list...

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Getting off the train

Getting off the train | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it

It is not just that Mr Erdogan wants to rewrite the constitution to award himself executive presidential powers. The trouble is that he hardly needs them. Sometimes overtly, but often by stealth and dissimulation, the AK party has spread its tentacles across Turkish society. The courts, the police, the intelligence services, the mosques, the public education and health systems and the media are all, in one way or another, subject to the party’s overweening influence.

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