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Impact of Restorative Justice on racially disparate exclusions | Ekklesia

Impact of Restorative Justice on racially disparate exclusions | Ekklesia | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Impact of Restorative Justice on racially disparate exclusions | Ekklesia - http://t.co/gCTlioGA #rj...
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roderick glover's comment, September 14, 2012 1:38 AM
The St. Louis Police Department working with University of Missouri-St. Louis criminology professor Rick Rosenfeld to reduce violent crime is what criminologist call “proactive”. Many cities have adopted this tactic to drop crimes in high victimized areas. This maneuver does have an effect on deterrence of crimes in the areas occupied by multiple squad cars. However, citizens in that area may start to complain about the random stops or police harassment. This tactic should be done in all areas in the city at different times, so some citizens would not feel targeted by race and social boundaries. The city cannot have any more strain with the citizens and department in the near future.
roderick glover's comment, September 14, 2012 2:06 AM
sorry wrong post

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Significant Digits For Monday, April 20, 2015

Significant Digits For Monday, April 20, 2015 | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
You’re reading Significant Digits, a daily digest of the telling numbers tucked inside the news. To receive this as an email newsletter, please subscribe. 12 percent Percentage of Hawaiian homes wi...
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Social Media in Vietnam

Social Media in Vietnam | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Vietnam’s 40m internet-users live in one of the better-connected countries in South-East Asia. Around 45% of Vietnamese are online (roughly the same proportion as in China). In the region, only Malaysia and Singapore have higher penetration rates. The use of social media has leapt—by two-fifths in the past year alone, according to one estimate.

Vietnam patrols the internet with a relatively light touch
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The fight over India's land laws

The fight over India's land laws | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Anywhere in the world the forcible sale of land is an infringement on landowners’ property rights. Why not simply let buyers and sellers agree to a transaction between themselves, free of any compulsion? Economists call it the “hold-out problem”. It crops up whenever a single buyer has to negotiate in sequence with many sellers for the contiguous plots of land it needs for, say, a flyover or a factory. A deal that makes everyone better off might exist in principle, if the social value of the project exceeds the sum required to persuade all land-holders to sell. But in practice once the buyer has acquired a few plots, it makes sense for other would-be sellers to hold out for a higher sum. These hold-outs can render almost any project unviable. Even where sellers are less shrewd, the costs of bargaining with them in series can kill a project. In India especially, even the smallest risk of a facing a challenge in court tends to result in a ruinously costly delay.

That is why even market-friendly economies, such as America’s, have laws that provide for compulsory land sales.
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FBI arrests six in Minnesota, California terrorism investigation -reports | Agricultural Commodities | Reuters

SAN DIEGO, April 19 (Reuters) - FBI agents have arrested six
people in Minnesota and California in connection with a
terrorism investigation, media in Minnesota reported on Monday.
Several of those arrested
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After broken gang truce, El Salvador sees deadliest month in 10 years

After broken gang truce, El Salvador sees deadliest month in 10 years | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Dr. Oscar Quijano touched his pinky to the hole in the head of the latest skeleton brought to the metal slab before him.
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Freedom in the World 2015 | Freedom House

Freedom in the World 2015 | Freedom House | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Each country score is based on two numerical ratings—from 1 to 7—for political rights and civil liberties, with 1 representing the most free and 7 the least free.
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Hometown dues

Hometown dues | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Seven years ago the central government began allowing city residents to divert a proportion of their income-tax payments to a furusato of their choice. The response has been overwhelming. In the last fiscal year rural towns earned ¥14 billion ($1.2 billion) from such contributions.
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Can you imagine doing this in the U.S.?  Send money home....

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How British elections work: the first one past the post wins!

How British elections work: the first one past the post wins! | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
ON MAY 7th Britain is holding a general election to choose a new government. The country has one of the oldest electoral systems in the world, which has evolved...
Rob Duke's insight:

It's a non-elected head of state, but Parliament really holds the power; and, whoever commands the most Members of Parliament (MP's) is the Prime Minister.  Increasingly, this means having to make deals with smaller parties.  If one cannot command a majority of one's own party, then concessions are made for joint rule (accepting some of that party's policies in exchange for their allegiance).

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Julius Matilainen's comment, Today, 7:17 PM
Thats the european way nowadays, that the president/monarch has been stripped from power to govern leaving the PM and his/hers cabinet to form the coalition and rule for the election period.

It also seems that all around the europe the political field is under a turning point, where people turn to new parties to find answer for resolving problems or just because they feel that the "old" parties doesn't represent their values anymore. A good example yesterdays MP elections in Finland. The second biggest party now (The finns party) had only 5 MP:s eight years ago, now they have 37 and are the second biggest party in our parliament.

It remains to be seen if the "new" parties are lasting phenomenon in european politics but at this stage it seems that the old parties must be able to make compromises in order to form a functional coalition and in so forth they must make compromises with agenda of the "new" parties.
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Some Context On The Aaron Hernandez Conviction

Some Context On The Aaron Hernandez Conviction | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
I’ve written about crime and the NFL before, particularly on domestic violence (“The Rate of Domestic Violence Arrests Among NFL Players”). Murder arrests were also part of the data set I used, and show how Hernandez’s case fits into the broader crime rates in the NFL. Arrest rates among NFL players are likely1 well below the national rates for the comparable age group, pretty much across the board. Overall, police arrest NFL players about 14 percent as often as other 25-29 year old males, but that ratio varies widely by type of offense.
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Why Inequality Persists in America

Why Inequality Persists in America | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
In 2001, the American Political Science Association formed a Task Force on Inequality and American Democracy; a few years later, it concluded that growing economic inequality was threatening fundamental American political institutions. In 2009, Oxford University Press published both a seven-hundred-page “Handbook of Economic Inequality” and a collection of essays about the political consequences of economic inequality whose argument is its title: “The Unsustainable American State.” There’s a global version of this argument, too. “Inequality Matters,” a 2013 report by the United Nations, took the view—advanced by the economist Joseph Stiglitz in his book “The Price of Inequality”—that growing income inequality is responsible for all manner of political instability, as well as for the slowing of economic growth worldwide.

The causes of income inequality are much disputed; so are its costs. And knowing the numbers doesn’t appear to be changing anyone’s mind about what, if anything, should be done about it.

In  “The Age of Acquiescence: The Life and Death of American Resistance to Organized Wealth and Power” (Little, Brown), Steve Fraser fumes that what’s gone wrong with political discourse in America is that the left isn’t willing to blame anyone for anything anymore. 

The growth of inequality isn’t inevitable. But, insofar as Americans have been unable to adopt measures to reduce it, the numbers might seem to suggest that the problem doesn’t lie with how Americans treat one another’s kids, as lousy as that is. It lies with Congress.


Via Svend Aage Christensen
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This Is How Bad The Health Care Is In Private Prisons

This Is How Bad The Health Care Is In Private Prisons | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
A nurse who supports the strike describes abysmal conditions at the jail, including broken or dirty equipment, rushed procedures and severe understaffing.

Via Concerned Citizen
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Kimberly Maddigan's comment, April 16, 9:15 PM
While it's sad that these inmates aren't receiving good healthcare, it's also not surprising. If you were to look at different healthcare facilities across the country, you would notice that some are great facilities and some are not. With that being said, this is prison. I wouldn't even begin to expect exceptional healthcare. Just like I wouldn't expect exceptional healthcare in a poor area. But, the inmates deserve to have clean working equipment and procedures that aren't rushed. It seems that with all these health violations, not only are the prisoners at risk, but so are the nurses. Overworked staffed are more likely to make mistakes that can put themselves at risk just as much as the prisoner. Hopefully the prison will hear the nurse's concerns and realize that something needs to be done to fix this problem. It might be a long road because I'm sure that understaffing is due to not being able to hire anyone because many nurses would much rather work in a hospital setting rather than in the prison.
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Simultaneous drinking and smoking marijuana increases odds of drunk driving

Simultaneous drinking and smoking marijuana increases odds of drunk driving | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Cannabis is the most commonly used drug among adults who drink, besides tobacco, yet no study has directly compared those who use cannabis and alcohol simultaneously, or at the exact same time, versus those who use both separately and on a regular...

Via Jocelyn Stoller
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Orion Hutchin's comment, April 17, 3:43 AM
They make a good point regarding the use pot to alcohol in this article. I think that alcohol increases risk or dangers when combined with almost anything that is or could become dangerous. I think the timing of this article is political. With states allowing marijuana to be used in a recreational fashion we are seeing these studies more main stream. Both pros and cons regarding the legalization of marijuana. To be alcohol the bigger issue when combining these two substances.
DERRICK NELSON's comment, April 19, 7:21 PM
Substance abuse has been around a long time. The article reports on an issue that has been a huge phenomenal controversial debate in the political realms. It's no surprise that with the decision of using alcohol and cannabis within the same time frame that it will increase the rate of drunk driving. That's probably why there isn't much research on testing that theory because it's a no brainer!
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Brain scans reveal how people 'justify' killing

Brain scans reveal how people 'justify' killing | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it

A new study has thrown light on how people can become killers in certain situations, showing how brain activity varies according to whether or not killing is seen as justified.

The study, led by Monash researcher Dr Pascal Molenberghs, School of Psychological Sciences, is published in the journal Social Cognitive and Affective Neuroscience.

Participants in the study played video games in which they imagined themselves to be shooting innocent civilians (unjustified violence) or enemy soldiers (justified violence). Their brain activity was recorded via functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) while they played.

Dr Molenberghs said the results provided important insights into how people in certain situations, such as war, are able to commit extreme violence against others.


Via Alessandro Cerboni
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Kimberly Maddigan's comment, April 16, 9:43 PM
I think that this study will be able to shed light on why people kill. It's an interesting study, and I hope they are able to look more into it as time goes on. It would be interesting to see if people with motive react differently than those who are just killing to kill. It would be interesting, if one day we could somewhat screen people to see if they are likely to be murderers or not. I'm interested to see what the future of this study holds.
Orion Hutchin's comment, April 17, 2:49 AM
The study seems interesting. However I would question it having grounds to speak to why a person killed someone. It would seem this test applies to how a person feels about he act. Not the reason why. It could help for things like PTSD
Gaynor Johansen's comment, Today, 12:13 AM
I think this brings up an interesting point because justified violence is obviously treated differently than normal violence. They use the example of soldiers but a more “hitting home” example might be cops. Not that all shootings by cops are justified, as shown by recent media, but every time a cop shoots and/or kills someone we judged them very differently whether we think it was justified or not.
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Why Do Mental Health Courts Work? A Confluence of Treatment, Support & Adroit Judicial Supervision by Michelle Edgely :: SSRN

Why Do Mental Health Courts Work? A Confluence of Treatment, Support & Adroit Judicial Supervision by Michelle Edgely :: SSRN | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
The article contributes to the understanding of ‘what works’ in mental health courts (MHCs). There are now almost 400 MHCs in the US and more worldwide. A subst
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As pot lovers mark their holiday, '420 is the new everything'

As pot lovers mark their holiday, '420 is the new everything' | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
In 1990, Steven Hager saw a flier that had circulated at a Grateful Dead concert in Oakland, Calif., urging people to meet at Mount Tamalpais at 4:20 p.m. on April 20 for some "420"-ing, the number that had become code for smoking marijuana in California.

Hager, then the editor of High Times magazine, had never heard of it, but he was intrigued. Hager did some research, discovering that the 420 code had first been used in 1971, when five friends at San Rafael High School smoked pot each day at 4:20 p.m.
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Mixed results for Alaska marijuana legislation as lawmakers wind down

Mixed results for Alaska marijuana legislation as lawmakers wind down | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
The Marijuana Control Board bill, House Bill 123, passed the House chamber Sunday morning by a vote of 37-1. Rep. Tammie Wilson, a Republican from North Pole, was the sole dissenting vote.

The bill would establish a Marijuana Control Board comprised of five volunteer members appointed by the governor. It would work under the auspices of the Alcoholic Beverage Control board, sharing the ABC board’s staff and director. Increased funding of $1.57 million for the ABC Board was placed in next year’s the budget for more staff and resources.
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Dove Real Beauty Sketches | You’re more beautiful than you think (3mins) - YouTube

In one of the most famous Dove films, Real Beauty Sketches explores the gap between how others perceive us and how we perceive ourselves. Each woman is the s...
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UN News - DOHA: UN conference weighs efforts to combat cybercrime, create safer digital world

UN News - DOHA:  UN conference weighs efforts to combat cybercrime, create safer digital world | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Efforts to tame the fast-growing cybercrime threat took centre stage at the United Nations Crime Congress under way in Doha, Qatar, as a diverse group of experts in the field urged strong partnerships between the public and private sectors to create a safer digital landscape.
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Talkeetna braces for troopers post closing expected to save $80K

Talkeetna braces for troopers post closing expected to save $80K | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
The state's plan to close the Alaska State Troopers post in Talkeetna for a savings of $80,000 a year is generating heated local criticism. 
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The Mao taboo

The Mao taboo | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Mao is still portrayed as the nation’s father. His image is everywhere. Every banknote bears his face, and his portrait hangs at the entrance to the Forbidden City. Though Mr Xi has crafted a narrative about the hardships he and others suffered during the Cultural Revolution, criticising Mao himself remains blasphemous. Once people start to laugh at the emperor, all authority is in doubt.
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Where Your State Gets Its Money

Where Your State Gets Its Money | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Vermont and New Hampshire are similar in a lot of ways -- they’re both small, heavily rural New England states that root for the Red Sox. But when it comes to taxes, they could hardly be more diffe...
Rob Duke's insight:

Alaska needs to revamp its tax system.  Here's a list of some best practices from 49 other states.  As I've said before, the revenue stream should be diversified and spread across sectors.  A small sales tax on both services and goods (2-4%), a small income tax (5%), Gas tax (20¢ gal.), Sin taxes (booze, cigarettes, marijuana), fees & permits, Tariff on imports (encourage local manufacturing and collect revenue on those profits that exit the state---I'm looking at you Walmart!), state shares in the property tax (to pay for schools throughout the state).  To the greatest extent possible taxes and fees should be tied to the service that they pay for....

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Gaynor Johansen's comment, April 19, 11:46 PM
I never really thought about the how the other states get there taxes. I knew here oil companies contribute it a lot but for example Nevada has “sin” taxes that contribute a lot to their taxes.
Rob Duke's comment, Today, 2:08 AM
Economics is an important part of the explanation for crime and the business of providing justice. I'm glad you were interested in the article....
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Carl Jung Depth Psychology: What is Jungian Analysis?

Carl Jung Depth Psychology: What is Jungian Analysis? | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
A form of therapy specializing in neurosis, aimed at bringing unconscious contents to consciousness; also called analytic therapy, based on the school of thought developed by C.G. Jung called analytical (or complex) psychology.

[Analysis] is only a means for removing the stones from the path of development, and not a method . . . of putting things into the patient that were not there before.

It is better to renounce any attempt to give direction, and simply try to throw into relief everything that the analysis brings to light, so that the patient can see it clearly and be able to draw suitable conclusions.

Anything he has not acquired himself he will not believe in the long run, and what he takes over from authority merely keeps him infantile.
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School-to-prison pipeline ignores difference between misbehavior and crime: Jarvis DeBerry

In way too many schools across America, what used to be counted as childish misbehavior, even childish defiance, gets labeled as criminality. Our children are being turned over to the police and funneled into courtrooms for doing things that wouldn't...

Via Darcy Delaproser, Jocelyn Stoller
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Orion Hutchin's comment, April 17, 3:48 AM
This is too much punishment. To me this would be classified as cruel and unusual. These are youths. They will do stupid things, some more than others. By using this method of punishment, the system is setting these kids up to fail in my opinion. Things should be taken on a case by case basis, with many of these cases not worth the tax payers time to push these kids into the court systems.
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Impossible scenarios: how do we make decisions in complexity? | Spark the Change

Impossible scenarios: how do we make decisions in complexity? | Spark the Change | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it

The General Manager (GM) of a municipal department was repeatedly getting bad press for the all-too apparent failings in maintaining city roads, drainage, sewage, and water. Continuous breakdowns in water supply, blockages in main drains and sewers were inconveniencing city residents and creating high costs in property damage. City Council was being taken to court for several cases of significant damage exacerbated by its insurer’s reluctance to settle claims promptly or on a reasonable basis.

The GM was being accused and abused by the press, the residents, his superiors, elected councilors and by his managers and staff who were taking much of the heat. He fell seriously ill.  While on sick leave the Mayor called him to discuss what he was going to do to address the growing storm of protest that was negatively affecting his chances of re-election. What did he have to say?

Up until now, his decisions were based on his lengthy experience with how to fix issues. In this new dilemma he was expected to come up with a ‘silver bullet’. But how?


Via Alessandro Cerboni
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The Very Real Hardship of Unpredictable Work Schedules

The Very Real Hardship of Unpredictable Work Schedules | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
voodooangel/Flickr On Monday, New York's attorney general announced that he had sent letters to 13 major retailers inquiring about their use of "on-call scheduling," which can make workers responsible for showing up at a moment's notice, or leave...

Via Jocelyn Stoller
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Kimberly Maddigan's comment, April 16, 9:24 PM
I almost took a job that was like this, however I was lucky enough to get offered another position with more stable scheduling. It's extremely hard to find work here in Texas, and because of that I was willing to take this job with crazy hours. My hours would've been anywhere from 7am to 12am any day of the week. Sometimes I would have to travel anywhere from 30 to 80 miles. Coming from Fairbanks, that is a HUGE commute just to go to work. But, because I needed a job I would've taken it. It was a floater position, and you would work depending on different job sites needs. I think that especially in the lower 48 where it is hard to find work, business can make these unpredictable work schedules. People NEED work, and will accept whatever they can get. However, it would make more sense to me to hire enough people to do the job. This would be beneficial to the employer and the employee because the employer has enough workers to do the job, instead of too many or not enough. I think that it would put a lot of stress on an individual because they can never plan for anything.
Gaynor Johansen's comment, Today, 12:02 AM
My retail job does not have this kind of scheduling and I am very thankful for that after reading this article. That type of scheduling can be a major problem for many of the reasons that they mention in the article like having kids, picking between class or work, and another job.