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'Son of Sam' Killer: Massacres 'Senseless'

'Son of Sam' Killer: Massacres 'Senseless' | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
"Take the glory out of guns," says David Berkowitz.
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Criminology and Economic Theory
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The Harvard Doctor Changing Nursing Homes Forever

The Harvard Doctor Changing Nursing Homes Forever | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
“All those animals in a nursing home broke state law, but for Thomas and his staff, it was a revelation. Caring for the plants and animals restored residents’ spirits and autonomy; many started dressing themselves, leaving their rooms and eating again. The number of prescriptions fell to half of that of a control nursing home, particularly for drugs that treat agitation. Medication costs plummeted, and so did the death rate.

“He named the approach the Eden Alternative — based on the idea that a nursing home should be less like a hospital and more like a garden — and it was replicated in hundreds of institutions in Canada, Europe, Japan and Australia as well as in all 50 U.S. states (the animal restriction in New York was voted down).”
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Old shoes and duckweed

Old shoes and duckweed | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Singapore’s leaders like to attribute their country’s phenomenal economic success in part to the political system: one just contested enough to keep the government honest; but not so much that it risks losing power, meaning it can withstand populist temptations and plan for the future. Mr Lee’s proposed reforms are in that vein—making sure that the system has checks and balances, but only ones the government can control. As opposition leaders were quick to point out, they do not even touch some of the main sources of the PAP’s electoral magic: its public-housing programme; a pliant mainstream press; an election commission that is under the prime minister’s office; and a political climate, even now, where dissent seems a terrible career choice. That Singapore has thrived with so little real restraint on the government is also a tribute to the incorruptibility of the Lee family and their colleagues. Whether it can continue to thrive without them, and without more far-reaching political reform, is a gamble.
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Cyanide & Happiness (Explosm.net)

Cyanide & Happiness (Explosm.net) | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it

Ridiculous shorts:

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And now for something completely different....it's a Monty Python thing....https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FGK8IC-bGnU

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Origins of Western Civ: Once upon a time

Origins of Western Civ: Once upon a time | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
A colonising power tends to impose its language on a subject land. However, for several generations, the relative status of Greek and Latin was in flux: to Romans, “Greek” was both the vernacular of slaves and the classical Attic standard of revered literature. But by the time Ennius, considered the father of Latin poetry, died in 169BC, Latin literature “had achieved escape velocity”. Self-assured Roman elites had become happily bilingual and biliterate, and in time this helped them rule a widespread and polyglot empire.

Mr Feeney contrasts the Romans with the Etruscans and the Carthaginians, neither of whom appear to have possessed a literature; and he provides interesting comparisons, for example with Japan’s borrowing of Chinese characters, first to write in Chinese and only later adapted to write Japanese. What was astonishing about Ennius’s “Annales” is that he superimposed Roman history upon that of the Greeks, “in a Homeric epic written in a language that was not Homer’s”. By now the growth of Latin literature was as certain as the expansion of Roman power.
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Mobsters Are Getting Whacked Off All Over the Place in Toronto | VICE | United States

The recent deaths of two members of Italian mafia families has caught the attention of the media. But what's really going on in Canadian crime?
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'Affluenza' Teen Ethan Couch Moved to Adult Jail

'Affluenza' Teen Ethan Couch Moved to Adult Jail | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Couch, now 18, killed four in a drunken-driving crash but was spared jail after his lawyers said he was so spoiled he couldn't tell right from wrong.
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Amanda Watkins's comment, February 6, 4:53 PM
I do not agree with this young man's sentencing at all. At 16 years old you know right from wrong. Yes, I agree that he probably had a lack of fear for consequences, especially since his mom assisted him in fleeing the country to avoid consequences. However, he will never learn (if he truly does not know right from wrong) if he is bailed out from consequences. He made a decision to end another persons life by choosing to drink and drive. I hope the mother was prosecuted for fleeing with her son.
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Prosecutor: Va. Tech freshman said she was ‘excited to be part of something secretive’

Prosecutor: Va. Tech freshman said she was ‘excited to be part of something secretive’ | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Natalie Keepers is accused of helping a classmate plan the slaying of Nicole Lovell, 13, and dump the body.
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Doctor convicted of murder for patients' drug overdoses gets 30 years to life in prison

Doctor convicted of murder for patients' drug overdoses gets 30 years to life in prison | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
A judge on Friday sentenced a Rowland Heights doctor to 30 years to life in prison for the murders of three of her patients who fatally overdosed, ending a landmark case that some medical experts say could reshape how doctors nationwide handle prescriptions.
The sentence came after a Los Angeles...
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What It’s Like Being Blackmailed Over a Webcam Sex Video | VICE | United States

Did you ever report it to the police?
No, because I just knew that if they're out of the country, there's nothing they can do about it. When I read your previous article about it, I thought it was good that other people were reporting it. I was glad when I found out I wasn't the only person it happened to because it felt pretty silly. I couldn't imagine if it happened to guys who were married or had kids—that's when they probably pay.
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Austyn Hewitt's comment, February 5, 4:50 PM
I have two opinions on this article. First, this guy is so not smart for getting naked in front of a stranger on Skype. Why would you get naked on the Internet for someone whom you met on the internet? I do not get it. Personally, I think if you act like that you deserve for a little backlash. I know that's a strong opinion but I believe that it is 100% preventable. Second, he should have filed a report with the police. They might have not been able to help that much but they could have looked into he females account. I think stuff like this happens all the time and no one reports it because they are embarrassed. I hope the guy learned his lesson to not Skype naked again.
Rob Duke's comment, February 5, 5:02 PM
This is also that kind of "don't throw me in the Briar Patch" behavior we see from offenders as they plead how they don't have the capacity to pay fines, etc.
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10 Most Corrupt Police Forces in The World

10 Most Corrupt Police Forces in The World | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Here are the 10 most corrupt police forces in the world. All around the world, police forces have been plagued by deep-rooted corruption & criminal activity
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Thomas Antal's comment, February 5, 3:09 PM
I can’t say I’m surprised that many of these corrupt police forces are in third world countries. These nations are in desperate need for basic infrastructure both economically and politically. But with a broken system there isn’t anyone going around and checking their practices. Many of these officers can be easily swayed by the dollar because their families need to be taken care of. Financially they don’t make much so turning to corruption brings in the extra cast to ensure their families are taken care of.
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Who killed the death penalty?

Who killed the death penalty? | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
The proof is overwhelming: capital punishment is dying. Statistically and politically, it is already mortally wounded, even as it staggers through an indeterminate—but probably brief—swansong. Fairly soon, someone will be the last person to be executed in America. The reasons for this decline themselves form a suspenseful tale of locked-room intrigue, unexpected twists and unusual suspects. So, whodunnit? Who killed the death penalty?

Twelve less angry men
Where politicians follow, voters often lead. Capital punishment is no longer a litmus test of political machismo because public enthusiasm for it is waning. Most Americans still favour retaining it, but that majority is narrowing. And one critical constituency—the mystery’s first prime suspect—is especially sceptical: juries.
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Chris Campbell's comment, February 4, 9:28 PM
Giving out the death penalty to any individual can be a hard decision and extremely costly. The way the death penalty is written and carried out now should be changed to suit cases that are for extreme criminals and that are won on fact and evidence. If you have a murder case and you can prove that the convicted individual is guilty with both facts and evidence, and that beyond a reasonable doubt this is the culprit then the death sentenced should be issued. Once issued it should be carried out within a week. The death penalty should not have a 16 year waiting period and cost the state a million dollars.
Linda Darnell's comment, February 5, 12:26 AM
I am sure that in some instances, the death penalty may seem like a just and fair way to initiate punishment for the wrongdoing. My issue with this is that there is such a large error associated with whether or not someone is wrongfully convicted and because of this the time between the act and the punishment can take a decade. After ten years, the association of the punishment to the crime is seemingly lost therefore rendering this method of punishment useless. Rational Choice Theory suggests that we should deter from crime based on the severity of the punishment given and with the death penalty it does not seem that this theory holds water.
Amanda Watkins's comment, February 6, 5:23 PM
I believe wrongful convictions have a lot to do with the decrease popularity towards capital punishment. If we are quick to jump to the death penalty without time to investigate further and consider new information in the case an innocent person can be killed. I personally believe in capital punishment depending on the crime committed and the amount of evidence against that individual. Capital punishment can also be a strong topic for a presidential candidate to use to further reach out to certain groups of people since capital punishment is one of those "hot topics".
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Chinese company Ezubao accused of being $7.6 billion Ponzi scheme

Chinese company Ezubao accused of being $7.6 billion Ponzi scheme | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Chinese police arrested 21 employees at China's largest online finance business on suspicion of fleecing 900,000 investors for $7.6 billion, in what could be the biggest financial fraud in Chinese history.

Via SustainOurEarth
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Nichole Bathe's comment, February 4, 4:21 PM
This is very interesting, China as a government is very interesting to start with. So I'm very interested to follow this story and see if these people are punished and if so what type of punishment they receive. We have been talking about how different countries deal with crime and how they punish crime, so I think this could be a good tell of how China's government deals with big companies ponzi schemes and comparing it to how the U.S would deal with it.
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Bill Cosby Could Dodge Sexual Assault Charges on a Weird Technicality | VICE | United States

Former Montgomery County District Attorney Bruce L. Castor Jr. told a judge Tuesday that he effectively gave Cosby immunity from criminal charges back then in order to compel him to testify in a civil suit instead.

"I decided that we would not prosecute Mr. Cosby and that would set a chain of events that would get some justice for Andrea Constand," the former district attorney said, suggesting that getting her money was "the best he could do." The civil suit was settled in 2006.
Rob Duke's insight:

All systems of justice produce the mitigated truth.  Would an Inquisitorial system have produced better justice in this case?

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Austyn Hewitt's comment, February 5, 5:03 PM
I do not know if there could be better Justice with using the inquisitorial system, maybe. I feel that the Bill Cosby case is very confusing and I do not know how it will end. This article discusses one women's experience but I know from other information outside of this article that countless other women have said so also. Knowing that information makes me question the whole case. Without using the outside information this case seems very unbalanced and that a lot of information or evidence is missing. I guess it will al be figured out on Wednesday.
Rob Duke's comment, February 5, 5:07 PM
In the F2F class, we watch the movie Polisse. It's a documentary style movie that shows life in a Paris Police vice unit. In it, there's one vignette of a child molester who has molested his daughter, but due to his political connections, it's unclear if he will be held accountable.
Rob Duke's comment, February 5, 5:13 PM
I highly recommend watching this moving: it's available on Netflix and on Amazon Prime. I recommend watching it to better understand the French system, but be aware that it's built along the same tragic lines as a Steinbeck novel--there are no happy endings. I also recommend viewing "A Separation"--about the Iranian civil and criminal law system. (available on Amazon Prime). Both are dramas and subtitled.
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Debunking the Myth of Socialist “Success” in Scandinavia

Debunking the Myth of Socialist “Success” in Scandinavia | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
In the new book Scandinavian Unexceptionalism: Culture, Markets and the Failure of Third-Way Socialism, academic Nima Sanandaji, Ph.D., makes an iron-clad case showing that the Nordic nations' relative success predates the welfare state and that socialism didn't lead to Scandinavia's success, but rather its back-pedaling. by Alex Newman
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This Canadian Lab Spent 20 Years Ruining Lives | VICE News

Four years ago, Yvonne Marchand lost custody of her daughter.

Even though child services found no proof that she was a negligent parent, that didn't count for much against the overwhelmingly positive results from a hair test. The lab results said she was abusing alcohol on a regular basis and in enormous quantities.

The test results had all the trappings of credible forensic science, and was presented by a technician from the Motherisk Drug Testing Laboratory at Toronto's Sick Kids Hospital, Canada's foremost children's hospital.

"I told them they were wrong, but they didn't believe me. Nobody would listen," Marchand recalls.

Motherisk hair test results indicated that Marchand had been downing 48 drinks a day, for 90 days. "If you do the math, I would have died drinking that much" Marchand says. "There's no way I could function."

The court disagreed, and determined Marchand was unfit to have custody of her daughter.
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Emily Alvey's comment, February 6, 4:58 PM
As I read through this article, I just got progressively more and more ANGRY! I do not know much about the court systems in Canada, but I fail to see how this could have possibly happened for so long? How could the courts use unaccredited labs, and rely on this science without looking into it? How does a lab go from "well it's not negative" to "Well that must mean you are consuming 48 drinks a day" or "well you must be giving your child an adult dose of crack." Now, everyone seems to be shrugging their shoulders and shaking their heads, but how many lives have been devastated because of this company's rational choice to flat out lie and fabricate evidence? Reputations were ruined, children pulled from their parents, parents losing their children, and when it comes to just desserts, will this company and the courts and agencies that used it receive anything more than a slap on the wrist for destroying families? Or will their issued statement of apology be all that most of these families ever get in the way of justice?
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Convergent evolution

Convergent evolution | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
The fossil on the right-hand side of this picture is not, as comparison with the modern insect on the left might suggest, a butterfly. It is a lacewing called...
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Something to go along with the genetic theories we study in a few weeks....

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If the game goes against you

If the game goes against you | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
When the game went against him in 2013 he needed his father’s maxims more than ever. After the FBI raid, the firm’s lenders and suppliers were nervous about the potential for gargantuan penalties, compensation payments and an exodus of clients. However, Pilot put on more steam, and cleaned up its mess relatively quickly. In November 2013 it paid $85m to settle a class-action lawsuit launched by more than 5,500 hauliers who had been short-changed on their rebates. A few companies continued to pursue separate lawsuits, of which one is still pending. In July 2014 Pilot accepted responsibility for the criminal conduct of its employees and paid the Justice Department a fine of $92m.

Its prompt actions to put things right meant that most of Pilot’s users stayed loyal to the company, says Ben Bienvenu, an analyst at Stephens, a financial-services firm. The same was true for most of its suppliers and lenders. “They are on a stable financial footing now,” says Manoj Chadha of Moody’s, a credit-rating agency. The company also made lots of changes to prevent a repeat of the rebate scandal. According to Samantha Stone at Standard & Poor’s, another rating agency, the sales team at head office was largely replaced, all transactions have been automated and customers can now demand that an independent auditor review their rebates.
Rob Duke's insight:

So, re-integrative shaming (RIS) works....see John Braithwaite's work for more on RIS.

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Update: Mannino found guilty in murder-for-hire case

Update: Mannino found guilty in murder-for-hire case | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Updated 1:55 p.m.: Guy Mannino was found guilty of soliciting murder of two federal agents and a witness. Not guilty of soliciting murder of his lawyer, a third agent. Sentencing
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Owner of home where Blake Fitzgerald was shot: 'He knew he had reached his end'

Owner of home where Blake Fitzgerald was shot: 'He knew he had reached his end' | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Blake Fitzgerald was killed; Brittany Harper was wounded.
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Friend Recalls Moment She Turned in Alleged 'Road Rage' Killer

Friend Recalls Moment She Turned in Alleged 'Road Rage' Killer | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
"The first words out of his mouth [were], 'I got them,'" Khatie Krisztian said.
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Amanda Watkins's comment, February 6, 5:03 PM
Honestly, he chose his life style and everything that comes with it. He also sells drugs to individuals that could potentially kill them. Paranoia comes from not living an honest lifestyle and he punished someone else for his choices. So what if it was his neighbor he mistakenly felt was following him when they happen to live in the same area? In his mind it is self defense, but in reality it is the territory of the lifestyle he chose and he should be held accountable for killing an innocent person. I do want to touch base on that if someone is involved in a road rage incident or hit and run that you try to get a good description and license plate number and turn that information over to police. I think driving around following people with a gun is 'asking for trouble', but not deserving of death.
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Putting a stop to Human Trafficking

Putting a stop to Human Trafficking | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
It's modern day slavery that is happening right here in the Central Valley. Details on the Fresno EOC's efforts to help the children and to bring awareness to this huge issue.
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Emily Alvey's comment, February 6, 7:19 PM
I love the idea of a conference that allows the public, and draws stories from a number of people in a number of fields with their experience on Human Trafficking to create awareness. This conference, with its slogan of "be free," is also a perfect example of solving a problem in a community using strengths based practice, and allowing people in the community who are passionate about the issue to learn more, and figure out how their individual strengths can be utilized to help fight human trafficking. It is a perfect time to recognize this issue, as one of the highest statistical time of people being kidnapped or forced into human trafficking is large sporting events such as the Superbowl. It is important to debunk the myth that human trafficking only includes trafficking for the purposes of sex. I believe here in Kodiak, there have been cases of human trafficking of people from other countries, for the purposes of sex, but also very much for the purposes of labor. It is a very real, and unfortunately prevalent issue in our society.
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Anchorage police: Car thief was listening to scanner when arrested

Anchorage police: Car thief was listening to scanner when arrested | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Joel Gould, 21, was pulled over and arrested for vehicle theft Tuesday morning -- just before the online police scanner he was listening to announced officers' plans to pull over and arrest him.
Rob Duke's insight:

Rational Choice Theory at work?

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Linda Darnell's comment, February 5, 12:21 AM
I wanted to add that in this instance, the scanner did not help him as he was still apprehended so my question would be to see if there is any data that could be available that shows how many criminals are actually apprehended that did in fact listen to the scanner and believed that their extra knowledge would keep them in the clear.
Thomas Antal's comment, February 5, 3:05 PM
This guy defiantly put some rational thought into his actions. With that scanner the guy can basically avoid any units before and after he scopes out an area. But the scanner shows the criminal knew what he was doing wrong so it will be harder to claim that it was just a one time deal.
Boan White's comment, February 5, 5:14 PM
I don't understand why the Anchorage police would allow the public free of charge access to there online scanner, the media I can understand, it just seems kinda silly, unnecessary, and contributing to the crime. I do like the idea of using a delay on the online scanner to prevent real time usage for criminals.
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Pussy Riot is back, and taking on corruption this time

Pussy Riot is back, and taking on corruption this time | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
For those baffled by the lyrics, they stem from an investigation released in December by the opposition leader Alexei Navalny, whom Ms Tolokonnikova calls “my political muse”. In a 45-minute film, Mr Navalny and his anti-corruption foundation implicated Mr Chaika and his sons in a vast web of graft that stretches from an Irkutsk shipyard to a luxury hotel in Greece. While Mr Navalny’s crusades against government officials are nothing new, the case against the Chaikas, if it claims are accurate, would be the most serious yet. Mr Navalny suggests that the prosecutor-general used his position not only to help his offspring build a vast business empire, but also to cover up their links to the Tsapok family, a criminal gang notorious for the mass murder of 12 people, including four children.

The film has penetrated beyond the crowd of supporters Mr Navalny’s investigations typically reach, racking up more than 4m views on YouTube. By late December, some 40% of Russians said they had seen or heard of it, a revealing figure given that the dominant state television networks paid the claims no heed. More revealing still was how little surprise the accusations generated amongst viewers. Nearly 80% found the accusations at least somewhat believable. As Ms Tolokonnikova sings, “I’m devoted to our old Russian business traditions: first the cops will pull you in for questioning, then it’ll look like an accident, you’ll be fed to the fish.”

The Kremlin, predictably, has dismissed Mr Navalny’s claims. Mr Putin’s chief of staff last week called the investigation an unsubstantiated “political statement”. Mr Chaika vehemently denied the charges, suggesting that Mr Navalny was carrying out orders for Bill Browder, an American financier who has become a fierce critic of Mr Putin since being driven out of Russia. Earlier this week, it was announced that Mr Chaika himself would oversee the inquiry into the accusations against him. (“I can’t say I’m surprised,” Mr Navalny responded.) At a meeting last week of Russia’s anti-corruption committee (on which Mr Chaika sits), Mr Putin acknowledged that uprooting graft would not happen “from one day to the next”. Transparency International’s latest Corruption Perceptions Index did show some improvement for Russia: it rose 17 places to 119 out of 167, sandwiched between Guyana and Sierra Leone.

During Russia’s fat years, many citizens shrugged at officials who plundered the government kitty; there was plenty of money to go around. Now, as oil prices linger below $35 per barrel, Russia looks poised for a second year of recession, and state funds are becoming scarce. Officials are scrambling to close a looming budget gap, after the government’s call for 10% spending cuts. The government has also been eyeing privatisation as a potential source of income. Mr Putin recently summoned the heads of several state-owned companies to the Kremlin for talks. Potentially on the chopping block are Rosneft, Aeroflot, Russian Railways, the state bank VTB, Bashneft, the diamond miner Alrosa and the shipping firm Sovcomflot.

Yet any sales of state companies will be haunted by the memory of the shady deals of the 1990s. Worse, buyers know that it may only be a matter of time before the state asks for its assets back. That happened with Bashneft back in 2014, when the billionaire Vladimir Yevtushenkov was temporarily arrested and his shares in the company seized. The legal system offered little recourse. Perhaps he should have released a rap video.
Rob Duke's insight:

Some background on Pussy Riot's song....

 

Those are prosecutor uniforms, by the way....

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Introducing ArcGIS Earth | ArcGIS Blog

Introducing ArcGIS Earth | ArcGIS Blog | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it

Via Fernando Gil
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Interesting in Crime Analysis--Learn GIS.

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Watch the Premiere of Pussy Riot's New Video 'CHAIKA' | VICE | United States

The anti-Putin, feminist punk rock band has released a video calling out the Russian government for its rampant corruption.
Rob Duke's insight:

Just in time for our class Pussy Riot launches another art attack of the Russian oligarchy and Putin in particular.

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