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Criminology and Economic Theory
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How Did The FBI Break Tor?

How Did The FBI Break Tor? | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
If you control enough of the Tor network, it’s possible to get a kind of bird’s eye view of the traffic being routed through it. It was clear that Tor thought the Carnegie Mellon researchers were responsible. The researchers refused to talk to the press, but a conference spokesperson told Reuters the talk was canceled because the researchers hadn’t cleared the release of their work through their department, the Software Engineering Institute, which is funded by the Defense Department.

 

At the time, many assumed that the university pulled the plug on the talk because of the gray legal zone it was in, with the researchers casually intercepting Web traffic. But maybe it got pulled because the researchers were revealing a law enforcement technique that the government did not want publicized. If nothing else, it’s highly likely the information the researchers collected about “drug dealers and child pornographers” made its way into law enforcement hands. McCord said he was “unable to comment on the matter.” Carnegie Mellon’s SEI declined comment about the canceled talk and about whether it had provided information from the research to law enforcement.

 

Learn more:

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/securite-pc-et-internet/?tag=TOR

 


Via Gust MEES
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Gust MEES's curator insight, November 7, 2014 3:50 PM
If you control enough of the Tor network, it’s possible to get a kind of bird’s eye view of the traffic being routed through it. It was clear that Tor thought the Carnegie Mellon researchers were responsible. The researchers refused to talk to the press, but a conference spokesperson told Reuters the talk was canceled because the researchers hadn’t cleared the release of their work through their department, the Software Engineering Institute, which is funded by the Defense Department.


At the time, many assumed that the university pulled the plug on the talk because of the gray legal zone it was in, with the researchers casually intercepting Web traffic. But maybe it got pulled because the researchers were revealing a law enforcement technique that the government did not want publicized. If nothing else, it’s highly likely the information the researchers collected about “drug dealers and child pornographers” made its way into law enforcement hands. McCord said he was “unable to comment on the matter.” Carnegie Mellon’s SEI declined comment about the canceled talk and about whether it had provided information from the research to law enforcement.


Learn more:


http://www.scoop.it/t/securite-pc-et-internet/?tag=TOR


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1-15 January 2013 Cyber Attacks Timeline

1-15 January 2013 Cyber Attacks Timeline | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
So here we are with the first Cyber Attacks Timeline for 2013 covering the first half of January. Apparently the new year has begun with an intense activity by Cyber Crooks. Hacktivists and Cyber C...

Via Gust MEES
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Gust MEES's curator insight, January 18, 2013 1:42 PM

A LOT from Education in there, about time to learn the basics of Cyber-Security ;)

 

Check ALSO:

 

https://gustmees.wordpress.com/2012/10/11/learning-basics-of-cyber-security-by-easy-to-follow-steps/

 

 

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How to Use Your Cat to Hack Your Neighbor’s Wi-Fi

How to Use Your Cat to Hack Your Neighbor’s Wi-Fi | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it

Late last month, a Siamese cat named Coco went wandering in his suburban Washington, DC neighborhood. He spent three hours exploring nearby backyards. He killed a mouse, whose carcass he thoughtfully brought home to his octogenarian owner, Nancy. And while he was out, Coco mapped dozens of his neighbors’ Wi-Fi networks, identifying four routers that used an old, easily-broken form of encryption and another four that were left entirely unprotected.


Learn more:


http://www.scoop.it/t/securite-pc-et-internet/?tag=Cats+as+wardriver




Via Gust MEES
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Gust MEES's curator insight, August 8, 2014 1:46 PM

Late last month, a Siamese cat named Coco went wandering in his suburban Washington, DC neighborhood. He spent three hours exploring nearby backyards. He killed a mouse, whose carcass he thoughtfully brought home to his octogenarian owner, Nancy. And while he was out, Coco mapped dozens of his neighbors’ Wi-Fi networks, identifying four routers that used an old, easily-broken form of encryption and another four that were left entirely unprotected.


Learn more:


http://www.scoop.it/t/securite-pc-et-internet/?tag=Cats+as+wardriver



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Here's Enough Digital Espionage to Scare James Bond [INFOGRAPHIC]

Here's Enough Digital Espionage to Scare James Bond [INFOGRAPHIC] | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Like James Bond does in the new hit film Skyfall, secret agents all over the world are now dealing with digital threats. Is this malware giving them a digital license to kill?

 

Read more, a MUST! See the reality and learn basics of Cyber-Security:

http://mashable.com/2012/11/10/james-bond-malware/

 


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