criminology and economic-theory
32 views | +0 today
Follow
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Karmen Louise Tobin from Criminology and Economic Theory
Scoop.it!

Why Can’t We Stop Working?

It’s just too gratifying.

Via Rob Duke
Karmen Louise Tobin's insight:

This is true. Sometimes work is therapeutic in a way. Building business relationships and respect. There is a truth in having balance and it seems hard at times. Priorities of trying to make everyone happy because you care about everyone, truth is you care about yourself too in this time and dedication and you enjoy it as well. It is self rewarding and good. I think it is just as important to have  balance within yourself  as your own person and this I believe should also be a priority.I love Harvard's way of thinking!! Very smart and I'm passing this on as I scoop it right up.

 

"How do we strike a balance, particularly when work itself can be so gratifying? (My consultant friend says his intense schedule is the result of his desire to “make a difference in people’s lives, and I am good at it. That is very hard to give up and it keeps a lot of people happy.”) True success means recognizing our real, individual priorities and, as best we can, living them out today instead of pinning our hopes on some mythical future state of “I’ll be happy when…”

This part is cited from the scoop article on Harvard's "just can't stop working." Because I love this part, words to remember.

more...
Joshua Matheny's comment, December 9, 2014 9:57 PM
I guess in this day and age it is hard to get ahead of the curve when it comes to the workforce and in order to do so you must work longer hours. Also, because of the way the economy has been for the past couple of years it is almost impossible to cut back on work when you have the ability to make more money and try to get ahead of your spending curve. Finding a balance like the article said can at times be hard, but it is most important to balance the things that are necessary in life whether that be a significant other, a family, or other duties that you have outside of work. Anyone can do it, we just have to learn how to deal within our means.
Rescooped by Karmen Louise Tobin from Criminology and Economic Theory
Scoop.it!

Homeland Security Today: Public Safety Officials Strongly Oppose Phone Company Plan on 911 Location Accuracy

Homeland Security Today: Public Safety Officials Strongly Oppose Phone Company Plan on 911 Location Accuracy | criminology and economic-theory | Scoop.it
Homeland Security Today is the leading source for independent news and analysis on homeland security affairs

Via Rob Duke
Karmen Louise Tobin's insight:

I can see that there could be an accuracy problem with cell phones calling in emergency's and location accuracy. If I am understanding this news article correctly, Homeland Security is wanting to beef up the systems to move forward their capabilities to be able to trace the whereabouts of cell phone calling 911, just like land lines and pay phones they can locate the whereabouts of the calls. I think that most people today use cell phones instead of landlines. I don't have a land line anymore and haven't for about 7-8 years. I use my cell phone for everything. I don't see anything wrong with this because when someone calls 911 for help and they get cut off I think its good they can locate the caller and call back, it saves people's lives this way. Not sure if I misunderstood. Sorry if I did.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Karmen Louise Tobin from Criminology and Economic Theory
Scoop.it!

Nice idea, now make it work

Nice idea, now make it work | criminology and economic-theory | Scoop.it
EXPECT righteous indignation, laced with racial animosity, at the week-long annual deliberations of the International Criminal Court (ICC) that kick off in New York...

Via Rob Duke
Karmen Louise Tobin's insight:

I feel trying to get criminal allegations to stick with there being compliance in the International Courts seems almost impossible sometimes in cases that I have read and this case is an another example of the corruption and non compliance that doesn't allow people to be heard and to have Justice. For the evidence to be with held because it has truth that would most likely prosecute and convict the accused is wrong. This article is another great example of corruption within the courts and International governments. Very sad and what can be done about this. Nigeria is also corrupt. I would be angry if I was involved with this case.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Karmen Louise Tobin from Police Problems and Policy
Scoop.it!

The Conversation Black Parents Have With Their Kids About Cops

The Conversation Black Parents Have With Their Kids About Cops | criminology and economic-theory | Scoop.it
Black parents say they've long known they have to have a different conversation than their white counterparts when it comes to talking about police with their children.
As the nation struggles with recent deaths of black males at the hands of white police officers, that conversation is more...

Via Rob Duke
Karmen Louise Tobin's insight:

I can't believe that there is still so much racial violence from the police towards black people and stereotyping and especially how they dress of how they will be perceived by the police if they are wearing certain clothing. Colored people have to be extra careful it seems with everything and I believe that the police officers who abuse their powers in being a police officer in all areas but especially in racial prejudiced should have huge life changing consequences and be made an example for what they have done. sounds harsh but I feel this way. Personally when I am pulled over I always show respect but I have never showed my hands.. yet.. and I have never had a problem, I'd like to keep it this way too. I know the officer is evaluating everything and I also know they are trained to see things to observe suspicious behaviors which I personally think is good.

more...
Rob Duke's curator insight, December 8, 2014 6:40 PM

Um? Yeah, that's what I do when pulled over, too.  I put my hands where the officer can see them, I turn on the dome light, and I treat them with respect.  All of these signal that I'm not a threat and serve to de-escalate the perceived danger of the stop.

Rescooped by Karmen Louise Tobin from Police Problems and Policy
Scoop.it!

Einstein: The Negro Question (1946)

Einstein: The Negro Question (1946) | criminology and economic-theory | Scoop.it
by Albert Einstein
I am writing as one who has lived among you in America only a little more than ten years. And I am writing seriously and warningly. Many readers may ask:
"What right has he to speak about things which concern us alone, and which no newcomer should touch?"

Via Rob Duke
Karmen Louise Tobin's insight:

This is really profound. We seem to forget that the "whites" took the "Negros" from their home for their own selfish gain, just as the whites were also stripped of their own liberty in being slaves for the Greeks. I think we forget where we come from and the truth. America is a home to be appreciated with liberty being something that we can be proud of and embrace. The facts that there are racial prejudice I do believe too like Einstein stated that it is a learned tradition and this is something that we need to have the courage to stand against. For the people that had the honor to be in Einstein's company were very lucky. I would have loved to be a sponge to learn from him. Wow! This is an amazing scoop.

more...
Rescooped by Karmen Louise Tobin from Police Problems and Policy
Scoop.it!

Police in Thailand Lay Down Weapons and Join with Protestors

Police in Thailand Lay Down Weapons and Join with Protestors | criminology and economic-theory | Scoop.it
In a stunning turn of events, Thailand police laid down their barricades and vests to join in solidarity with protestors.

Via Darcy Delaproser, Rob Duke
Karmen Louise Tobin's insight:

I know we don't see this rare situation happening everyday... The people of Thailand taking a stand against the corruption and the abuse of power even their law enforcement stood with them... This is doing what is right! There is comment in the article that if other countries followed suit it would be awesome to see political changes.

more...
Jennifer Slingerland's comment, November 20, 2014 10:27 PM
This is absolutely stunning to see. After years of watching Cairo, Ukraine, London, Ferguson, New York, and many many MANY other protests end with tear gas, multiple arrests, and many injured citizens, it is refreshing to see a protest in which both sides decide to lay down their differences in order to cooperate. It’s incredible to see that the police have decided to join up with protestors after everything that has happened; and to think that it was possible all because the protestors explained why they were protesting at all… I hope everyone else takes a page from this and walks away with new tactics to deal with their own struggles. Police aren’t there to bully us all down and force us to live with corruption. They’re people, too. They abide by the same laws and operate under the same government that we do. Should we take the time to explain the importance of revolution in a manner which benefits everyone, then perhaps we’d see less people being held at gunpoint while they stand around chanting on behalf of change.
Ricky Osborne's comment, November 22, 2014 1:07 AM
Something like this would never happen in the United States its seems. Riot police have been shown to be indifferent and unattached to the protestors that they have been charged with. They are shown as tools being used by the government or state in which they are employed. This event in Thailand makes these officers seem human again. That is exactly what they are, they are human. They have goals and opinions of things that occur within their respective communities. This act of laying down their arms and sitting with the protestors they were charged with running off is both powerful and emotional. I’m glad to see something like this happening today.
Rescooped by Karmen Louise Tobin from Police Problems and Policy
Scoop.it!

The FBI Is very excited about this machine that can scan your DNA in 90 minutes

The FBI Is very excited about this machine that can scan your DNA in 90 minutes | criminology and economic-theory | Scoop.it
Rapid-DNA technology makes it easier than ever to grab and store your genetic profile. G-men, cops, and Homeland Security can't wait to see it everywhere.

Via Rob Duke
more...
Jennifer Slingerland's comment, November 20, 2014 10:41 PM
The FBI isn’t the only one excited about this development. How incredible it is that we’re coming so far with this technology; my great-great grandparents moved across the nation from east to west in covered wagons. Now we’re mapping the genetic makeup of human beings in the time it takes to watch a bad Jack Black movie. But think of the possibilities such a machine will unfold for our prison system. No longer will suspects need to wait for days and days to be cleared of suspicion by means of DNA testing. In the time that they take to interrogate these people, the forensics unit could be scanning and mapping their DNA profiles in order to compare to evidence. I’m absolutely blown away by this figure. I can only hope that it’s an accurate way to conduct such a test.
Ricky Osborne's comment, November 22, 2014 1:01 AM
The RapidHIT machine will do wonders in the field of law enforcement in the foreseeable future. Recovering and examining DNA in a crime scene is crucial in figuring out who did what and how it happened. This process of examining DNA unusually takes up to 2 full days to be completed through traditional methods. By being able to shorten this process to 90 mins will allow officer to go after criminals much more quickly. This window right after the crime occurs is important in whether or not the perpetrator is caught. The RapidHIT machine will allow for more criminals to be captured much more quickly through this technological advancement.
Amanda McColley's comment, November 30, 2014 3:55 PM
This is awesome for when it comes to closing closes and being able to possibly close many cold-cases as well in a much faster fashion. Of course there are going to be many people who will fear this and assume it will be used to convict someone before they even go before a jury, there is so much positive potential for a machine like this. Hopefully the accuracy stays high and there are no bugs that come from being able to complete something that used to take days. The fact that once DNA is gathered that officers can be after a suspect so much more quickly is fantastic because it will lower the time someone could get away if they try to get away from the scene.
Rescooped by Karmen Louise Tobin from Criminology and Economic Theory
Scoop.it!

How the way we walk can increase risk of being mugged

How the way we walk can increase risk of being mugged | criminology and economic-theory | Scoop.it
The way we move can influence the likelihood of an attack by a stranger. The good news, though, is that altering it can reduce the chances of being targeted.

Via Randy L. Dixon Rivera, Rob Duke
Karmen Louise Tobin's insight:

This makes sense to me because you can tell a lot about a person by the way they carry themselves in their body language. (most times anyways) In a broad sense you can read if someone seems sneaky (maybe you can spot the attacker's body language by the way they carry their head while walking etc.) or dishonest, insecure and I also believe eye contact has a lot to do with a person and seeing if they are up to no good in a sense, I'd rather be the spotter than the one being spotted. In relation to this article, I spoke to someone awhile ago and they worked with abused children and woman and had to meet with the accused. In her years of training in this field she did speak about this topic that's discussed in this article that I found interesting. She said that vulnerable, insecure young girls are often an easy target, for example, if they are homeless on the streets and no family and older people. She said that people who hold themselves in confidence seems to be a deterrence to the attacker because the attacker sees your strong. They prey on what they see as weak.

 

more...
Brandon Jensen's comment, November 21, 2014 6:01 PM
I have actually read about this before a couple months ago, I found it rather interesting, something I have not really given much thought to but it makes sense. People do let a lot about themselves show when walking and apparently that can send the wrong message to a potential mugger.
Elizabeth Sheppard's comment, November 22, 2014 3:43 AM
The article still doesn't tell me exactly how to walk to avoid being targeted? Other than your “energy” when you walk. I say the targeting comes down to how you are dressed, if you are alone, age, and sex. The walk I think is the last variable the the criminal looks at. Perhaps a rushed walk may be picked up by a criminal as a target but other than that its down to the other reasons. Body language is always being read by other people and it does say a lot about the person but emotions I think can control a persons walk.
Kristi Gray's comment, December 2, 2014 4:22 PM
I wish this article talked more about how different ways of walking can increase the risk of being mugged. It did not go into very much detail about it. One thing that was mentioned in this article that stuck out to me the most was when people were dressed in black body suits and attached reflective markers to their joints. This made it so the only thing people could watch and judge was pure movement. That was interesting, but I do not believe that it is a very accurate way of figuring anything out about anyone.
Rescooped by Karmen Louise Tobin from Criminology and Economic Theory
Scoop.it!

Laughing at the humourless

Laughing at the humourless | criminology and economic-theory | Scoop.it
No laughing matter “IF I were a cow, I would be wearing a bra,” goes a lyric in a popular song about Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi, the leader of Islamic State (IS). This...

Via Rob Duke
Karmen Louise Tobin's insight:

If you can't laugh at this crazy jazz then forget about it! "Naked utters" LOL...  I can't believe that these kind of things are happening in the world right now. i hope it will end at some point..

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Karmen Louise Tobin from Criminology and Economic Theory
Scoop.it!

Why Indians love cricket

Why Indians love cricket | criminology and economic-theory | Scoop.it
TO OUTSIDERS, the magnitude of Indians' love for cricket is as incomprehensible as its feverish intensity. On February 4th India awarded the Bharat Ratna, its highest civilian honour, to Sachin Tendulkar, a recently retired batsman. Millions in India, a country of 1.3 billion people and only one nationally-popular game, celebrated wildly. When India's national side plays a big game, an estimated 400m watch on television. Yet cricket's take-off in India is a highly improbable development. The game is demanding to play properly, requiring space, a good turf pitch and expensive equipment—which only a relative handful of Indian cricketers have access to. Most will never strap on pads or bowl with a leather ball. So why do they so love the game?

 

Tags: sport, popular culture, culture, development, India, South Asia, globalization, empire.


Via Seth Dixon, Rob Duke
Karmen Louise Tobin's insight:

India is beautiful!!! I just saw that movie, "The Million Dollar Arm" that reminds me of cricket/baseball like this article. Making it to the BIG TIME! How cool is that!

 

more...
Mark Hathaway's curator insight, November 10, 2015 6:19 AM

Why do Indians love Cricket? As with most modern day countries, colonialism has something to do with it. However, the British never intended to promote Cricket in India. It was the local elite of India that first pushed to incorporate the game into Indian culture. Desperate to gain the prestige that the British attached to the game, the elite began the practice of playing Cricket in India. In the years following independence, the game has spread to the other classes of Indian society. The game has become the national pastime for the nation.

Benjamin Jackson's curator insight, December 14, 2015 11:52 AM

this is an interesting reason for a game to spread. it was a game played by the elite, so it never really lost the appeal of being a sport of the rich.

 

Martin Kemp's curator insight, December 17, 2015 3:30 PM

i have tried to watch a cricket match before but it seemed so odd, i dont really fully understand the game but the people playing (especially inians) were playing more than a game, for them it seemed like they were playing for their country and it was a great honor to them. unlike a sport like soccer where people play for other countries teams.

Rescooped by Karmen Louise Tobin from Criminology and Economic Theory
Scoop.it!

The tragedy of physician-assisted suicide

The tragedy of physician-assisted suicide | criminology and economic-theory | Scoop.it
In a heartbreaking situation, Brittany Maynard's choice to die seems tragic.

Via NANCY PETERS, Rob Duke
more...
NANCY PETERS's comment, November 11, 2014 11:49 PM
Thank you for that comment Kimberly. I try to see death as coming home and a part of living rather than dwelling on the tragedy. I thought Brittany was very brave though and I understand most people who request assisted suicide do not go through with it.
Hugo Elvis's curator insight, November 14, 2014 4:39 AM

L'histoire d'une femme américaine agée de 29 ans et gravement malade. Recours au suicide assisté, article avec une réaction sur le plan religieux et moral.

Hugo Elvis's comment, November 28, 2014 4:33 AM
guiguhi
Rescooped by Karmen Louise Tobin from Police Problems and Policy
Scoop.it!

Conflict Strategies for Nice People

Conflict Strategies for Nice People | criminology and economic-theory | Scoop.it
Conflict is a necessary part of a functioning team. But it doesn't need to be mean.

Via Rob Duke
Karmen Louise Tobin's insight:

Love this article and is so true. I can relate to this article in a big way, I know more people than not in my life that run from confrontation and want to just keep the peace, "not rock the boat." I have always disagreed with this and thought it was weird that people do this and this has been at a price at times for myself. I do believe it is in the delivery for sure and you get more done from that. If we don't offer diversity and just always agree, how do you discover your own unique individuality? This part of this is important and its not about being right or wrong, its about bringing individual perspective and this is how innovation is born. I wholeheartedly believe that you are more healthy when you are communicating in a healthy way  and you find things are much better for everyone, the entire team. Its important to feel and be approachable. Important....

more...
Rob Duke's curator insight, November 4, 2014 10:54 AM

Good soft power advice, too.

Brittney Ward's comment, November 13, 2014 1:57 PM
I think developing good conflict resolution strategies like this is a good thing. Conflict can occur in any aspect of life, knowing how to handle it can help deescalate a situation so it doesn't grow out of control. I think an important thing to note is that conflict doesn't go away because it is avoided, it goes away because it is addressed.
Rescooped by Karmen Louise Tobin from Police Problems and Policy
Scoop.it!

California Voters Deal Blow To Prisons, Drug War

California Voters Deal Blow To Prisons, Drug War | criminology and economic-theory | Scoop.it
California approved a major shift against mass incarceration on Tuesday in a vote that could lead to the release of thousands of state prisoners.

Nonviolent felonies like shoplifting and drug possession will be downgraded to misdemeanors under the...

Via Darcy Delaproser, Rob Duke
more...
Melia Markell's comment, November 5, 2014 9:20 PM
I think this can be a potentially great shift to help alleviate some of the pressures that California faces in regards to crowding and overpopulation of prisons. I agree with the statement that was made that when people are not feeling terrified, they're more willing to back off of tough-crime policies. I think that this can be a shift that many states around the US can start to adopt as it doesn't put major criminals out on the streets, but just lowering offenses of things like shoplifting, to a lower offense instead of crowding our prisons with these misdemeanors.
Karmen Louise Tobin's curator insight, November 6, 2014 6:07 PM

Okay I just scooped this up but not sure where it went so here I go again, sorry if this is a repeat. I think that "Pro. 47" is great for the budget for CA and to trim down on the overpopulated jails as well as put your money where it counts towards rehabilitation. I don't know if I think that its a good thing to drop drug offenses down to a misdemeanor and this could bring different changes, like Law Enforcement stated, "it may be hard to prosecute date rape drugs as well as enforcing  gun convictions."  I agree. I do believe that some offenses are better to not have a long jail sentence and approaching offenses with a rehabilitation approach I see as a great approach that also offers benefits to long term changes.

Brittney Ward's comment, November 13, 2014 1:53 PM
Karmen, I agree that this will be good for CA budget when it comes to $$ spent on corrections. My only reservations about this is like mentioned it will become harder to convicted drug related crimes at a felony status. Also a concern CA is going to have to address is making sure they have programs available for rehabilitation services. more often than not drug users in jail receive some sort of court mandated rehabilitation, making sure they keep up the efforts to rehabilitate could be a challenge.
Rescooped by Karmen Louise Tobin from Criminology and Economic Theory
Scoop.it!

Seize the moment to reform our failed prison system

Seize the moment to reform our failed prison system | criminology and economic-theory | Scoop.it
Newt Gingrich and Van Jones say that criminal justice reform is easier now than ever for the federal government.

Via Rob Duke
Karmen Louise Tobin's insight:

This is awesome! I disagree, I think more is going to be done with the Republicans holding the seats economically and morally I believe that there will be positive changes and some things are going to turn around for the positive. That's awesome that there is going to be reform on long prison sentences even if money has to be spent  on rehabilitation for the people released, even then in the long run financially I think things will be better as well as emotionally and in every way.

 

more...
Rodney Ebersole's comment, December 10, 2014 12:11 AM
I agree that prison reform is needed in this country and our current system is obviously not working. Keeping a kid in jail for 15 years over a drug possession charge is ridiculous and part of the problem with our current system. I am against drug use but how is it I read of a child molester getting five years in jail and a child does pot and they go to jail for 15 years? The idiocy of that should be known to anyone. I hope true prison reform comes and a system that punishes in direct relation to what crime was done is accomplished.
Alexander Yakovlev's comment, December 11, 2014 2:23 AM
I am pretty sure there is a better prison system then the one they used. Prisoners can work for themselves instead of spending state’s money. As a reporter said, the Mississippi state is much smarter on how to use their prison money then California. I think that there lots of hidden ways of corrupting that money, hence they are “spending” more.
Rescooped by Karmen Louise Tobin from Criminology and Economic Theory
Scoop.it!

We need to teach children how to think, not what to think

We need to teach children how to think, not what to think | criminology and economic-theory | Scoop.it
In its ideal form, education should be socially progressive. We teach the next generation of scientists, engineers and medical researchers who will improve our quality of life: they will learn more about…

Via NANCY PETERS, Rob Duke
Karmen Louise Tobin's insight:

WOW! This is a great and on point article. I think we have come along way since of ancestors in morals, like racism is wrong, for example. This is a very refreshing article. I do believe that teachers do need to be careful in their practice in what they are saying to our children and to keep their personal point of views out of their practice. Like mentioned in the article on religious beliefs and abortion. I know that in some schools some teachers are influencing children on "what to think and that this is the right way instead of how to think," like the title of this article says. I do see a huge difference in these perspectives. Another example I want to state is that I do not believe  a teachers practice should be telling my kids that being gay is okay. This is not their responsibility to tell my children these sort of things. I don't believe there should be opinions or judgments spoken about these things or about anything that doesn't pertain to their education and vise versa. I also believe if a teacher is discussing abortion with my child that this is wrong and inappropriate. If you were to ask my kids about God they would tell you that they love God and I think this is a good thing. There are boundaries I believe to what is appropriate. I believe our educators need to focus on what is important in education.

more...
Joshua Matheny's comment, December 13, 2014 12:29 PM
Morality is important to teach and is something that is almost completely skimmed over in schooling. I learned a little bit about morality growing up in a private school for most of grade school, however, this is not the norm of other schools especially public ones. As this piece said, it is important for teachers to show their ethics through teaching but not to force it onto children. Controversial is the key to whether or not they should speak out against certain things such as racism. Exploration is key to understanding the ethical world we live in and make your own decisions as to what that entails.
Rescooped by Karmen Louise Tobin from Criminology and Economic Theory
Scoop.it!

Mexico Among The World's Most Corrupt Nations In 2014, New Report Says

Mexico Among The World's Most Corrupt Nations In 2014, New Report Says | criminology and economic-theory | Scoop.it
With allegations of corruption in government, politics, business and banking emerging throughout the year, corruption was one of the most pervasive issues in Mexico in 2014. It came as no surprise, therefore, that the country scored worse than previously in the year-end corruption perceptions report by Transparency International released December 3rd.

With a score of 35 on a scale of 0 (highly corrupt) to 100 (very clean), Mexico ranked 103 among 175 countries in the group’s Corruption Perceptions Index, which ranks countries and territories based on how corrupt their public sector is perceived to be. The best-ranked country is Denmark and the worst is Somalia. Among the 31 countries of the Americas addressed in the survey, ten ranked lower than Mexico: Argentina, Ecuador, Dominican Republic, Guatemala, Guyana, Honduras, Nicaragua, Paraguay, Haiti and Venezuela. Canada ranked highest and Venezuela lowest. Mexico is also ranked the most corrupt among the OECD countries.

Via Jim Wesberry, Jocelyn Stoller, Rob Duke
Karmen Louise Tobin's insight:

That is so scary. I'm speechless and that's saying something because that never happens. I wonder if the Mexican government is corrupt because of the extreme poverty there? I have never had a desire to go to Mexico even though its beautiful because I have heard so many stories about the dangers of being there, for example, at 10 o'clock stay inside. I feel very sad for the students that were killed there and for their families. Why do people do things like this, its horrible! A little random but on topic of Mexico/corruption and this even involves the U.S. in "The Fast and the Furious dilemma." This is an article from the

 

LA Times:

"

ATF’s Fast and Furious scandalA federal operation dubbed Fast and Furious allowed weapons from the U.S. to pass into the hands of suspected gun smugglers so the arms could be traced to the higher echelons of Mexican drug cartels. The Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives, which ran the operation, has lost track of hundreds of firearms, many of which have been linked to crimes, including the fatal shooting of Border Patrol Agent Brian Terry in December 2010.

A U.S. Border Patrol agent arrives for a memorial service for slain comrade Brian Terry on Jan. 21, 2011, in Tucson. Terry was killed during a shootout the month before near the U.S.-Mexico Border."(John Moore / Getty Images)

My questions are how and why did this happen? Mexico and the U.S. corruption.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Karmen Louise Tobin from Police Problems and Policy
Scoop.it!

WASHINGTON: Former Seattle police chief: Too much fear on the force | National | The Bellingham Herald

WASHINGTON: Former Seattle police chief: Too much fear on the force | National | The Bellingham Herald | criminology and economic-theory | Scoop.it
As protests erupt over police killings of unarmed African-Americans, one former police chief is experiencing a painful case of déjà vu.

Via Rob Duke
Karmen Louise Tobin's insight:

What speaks to me in this is if you are not honest with yourself then your not facing the true issues at hand within the department functions. For example, racism, the bigger the blacker and that white cops have fear, that's crazy. The difference between the soldier and cop is huge. I also see this as the soldier is the militant approach where the police officer is the community policing approach. I am in wholehearted agreement of what the chief stated, "that if there is a threat he is going to address it and that if the cops only concern is to make sure they make it home at the end of the day then they shouldn't be a cop. The cop made the decision to become an officer knowing the risks at hand and they were not drafted into this position." Also, I agree people have no idea what police officers encounter in their positions and the life threatening dangers they encounter that the truth is in a split second their life can taken. I know it is important to have diffusion of conflict strategies to avoid violence but sometimes there isn't that choice, I also agree wholeheartedly  with this. Which brings me to a very good point from the chief that "training alone isn't sufficient." "There needs to be a professional structural change within the departments." This is a great scoop.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Karmen Louise Tobin from Police Problems and Policy
Scoop.it!

5-foot-tall ‘Robocops’ start patrolling Silicon Valley

5-foot-tall ‘Robocops’ start patrolling Silicon Valley | criminology and economic-theory | Scoop.it
Autonomous “Robocop”-style robots, equipped with microphones, speakers, cameras, laser scanners and sensors, have started to guard Silicon Valley.

Via Rob Duke
Karmen Louise Tobin's insight:

This is so weird. I wondered if this would ever happen actually having robots serve as security and even law enforcement to gather data.

 

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Karmen Louise Tobin from Police Problems and Policy
Scoop.it!

An Easy Way to Make Your Employees Happier

An Easy Way to Make Your Employees Happier | criminology and economic-theory | Scoop.it
Give them a challenge.

Via Rob Duke
Karmen Louise Tobin's insight:

This is an interesting article and I don't know if we notice how important it is to challenge ourselves or if we even notice. We can get bored and complacent and I believe we should be aware to stay on our toes to make sure this doesn't happen but when or if this happens this article makes me think of how important it is to grow. 

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Karmen Louise Tobin from Criminology and Economic Theory
Scoop.it!

Criminal Justice News: U.S. Marshals 15 Most Wanted Fugitive’s Skull Found by Family Dog

Criminal Justice News: U.S. Marshals 15 Most Wanted Fugitive’s Skull Found by Family Dog | criminology and economic-theory | Scoop.it

Via Rob Duke
Karmen Louise Tobin's insight:

I wonder what happened to the fugitive who escaped? That's crazy and what are the odds of that happening only a few miles away from where he broke out? I found it interesting that the man who found the skull with his dog was able to get such a good description of the mans hairline, type of haircut, and the mans ear. Forensics to me is fascinating.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Karmen Louise Tobin from Criminology and Economic Theory
Scoop.it!

The Other Side of Suicide.

The Other Side of Suicide. | criminology and economic-theory | Scoop.it
That kind of resiliency took another character trait that many people assume victims of suicide lack---courage. She weathered the brutal blows of mental illness

Via Rob Duke
Karmen Louise Tobin's insight:

This article actually brought tears to my eyes. We never know what someone is going through and sometimes we are quick to judge because we don't understand. I also think it's neat to hear a story about how a son who lost his innocence in losing his mother to suicide but had it replaced with perspective and understanding. He also had compassion after he saw her struggles more clear, mental illness is sad. I don't see suicide as weak I see it as sad and I feel life is crazy sometimes. Sometimes its better and okay to not understand.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Karmen Louise Tobin from Criminology and Economic Theory
Scoop.it!

Neighbors’ Were Arguing Over Dog Poop Before Alleged Double Stabbing

Neighbors’ Were Arguing Over Dog Poop Before Alleged Double Stabbing | criminology and economic-theory | Scoop.it
Police said a fight between neighbors over unscooped dog poop on private property escalated to a brutal double stabbing in Springfield Saturday.

Via Rob Duke
Karmen Louise Tobin's insight:

This article makes me think of a dog pooping in my yard story while the owner was oblivious or just didn't care to notice! Now maybe its not appropriate to share something funny because this guy tried to kill this woman, holy cow, over poop! People really have some scary issues... Do we need to watch what we say or we might get stabbed? When I lived in WA I pulled into my driveway at 8am and it was a warm morning and the sun was shining bright when this guy had his dog leash extended as far as it could extend while he was enjoying his cup of coffee  and his dog was pooping in my grass! I thought are you kidding me, lets be funny about this... I said good morning hows it going? I was thinking about walking up the street with my dog in a few minutes with my morning cup of coffee in one hand and I am going to look at your house while my dog poops in your grass... He said, well what kind of dog do you have? I said a Saint Bernard... His face was so funny so I just laughed... I was amused, who does that? LOL But this article is not a laughing matter, there is some scary people out there.

more...
Rob Duke's curator insight, November 9, 2014 11:52 AM

Yep, fighting over dog poop.  A little ADR here could have saved some serious injuries.  Cops need to learn mediation and we need a system where resources are made available for mediation centers to create capacity in communities.

Rescooped by Karmen Louise Tobin from criminology and economic-theory
Scoop.it!

The tragedy of physician-assisted suicide

The tragedy of physician-assisted suicide | criminology and economic-theory | Scoop.it
In a heartbreaking situation, Brittany Maynard's choice to die seems tragic.

Via NANCY PETERS, Rob Duke, Karmen Louise Tobin
Karmen Louise Tobin's insight:

I scooped this up once but I don't know where my comments went, so sorry for the repeat. This is a heart breaking story, soooo sad. I didn't know that Oregon State allowed physician assisted suicide, that is so crazy! Like the writer of the article said, did she leave before she should have because she chose to take her own life and she missed out on precious time with the people she loved? I believe that suicide shouldn't be given as a choice to people no matter what, this shouldn't be a choice, to me its saying that suicide is okay and this way of thinking is also assisting people to give up and not have faith. I believe that God can make you better and suicide didn't allow him to show this.

more...
NANCY PETERS's comment, November 11, 2014 11:49 PM
Thank you for that comment Kimberly. I try to see death as coming home and a part of living rather than dwelling on the tragedy. I thought Brittany was very brave though and I understand most people who request assisted suicide do not go through with it.
Hugo Elvis's curator insight, November 14, 2014 4:39 AM

L'histoire d'une femme américaine agée de 29 ans et gravement malade. Recours au suicide assisté, article avec une réaction sur le plan religieux et moral.

Hugo Elvis's comment, November 28, 2014 4:33 AM
guiguhi
Rescooped by Karmen Louise Tobin from Police Problems and Policy
Scoop.it!

When social media complicate the undercover work of police officers

When social media complicate the undercover work of police officers | criminology and economic-theory | Scoop.it
The Facebook post included several photos of a smiling Baltimore County police officer, some of him in a suit, another sporting outdoor gear. None showed him in uniform or flashing a badge.

Via Rob Duke
Karmen Louise Tobin's insight:

Ooooh child I wonder how people find out this information anyways? This is why I really don't like social medias sometimes because there are those people who snoop around in people's business, Facebook stalking and all that jazz. Social medias to me are enter at your own risk and your info is on there forever so I know that Officers have to be careful because people would love to retaliate on cops for different reasons. I would never identify myself ever on social networks ever if I was in that position. My boyfriends son is a Police Officer ion NH, Massachusetts and he goes to work in his normal clothes and leaves in his normal clothes so he isn't identified in his Police uniform.

more...
Sarah O'Leary's comment, November 8, 2014 3:01 AM
This is yet another example of the ways the social media can be abused for the worst. With growing ways that officers are targeted, there should be additional ways that they should protect their identities on the internet.
Brandon Jensen's comment, November 12, 2014 8:49 PM
It is situations like this that make me really hate the internet sometimes but I guess there will always be things like that and the best we can do is hope that people don't always believe what someone said on the internet!
Rescooped by Karmen Louise Tobin from Police Problems and Policy
Scoop.it!

California Voters Deal Blow To Prisons, Drug War

California Voters Deal Blow To Prisons, Drug War | criminology and economic-theory | Scoop.it
California approved a major shift against mass incarceration on Tuesday in a vote that could lead to the release of thousands of state prisoners.

Nonviolent felonies like shoplifting and drug possession will be downgraded to misdemeanors under the...

Via Darcy Delaproser, Rob Duke
Karmen Louise Tobin's insight:

Okay I just scooped this up but not sure where it went so here I go again, sorry if this is a repeat. I think that "Pro. 47" is great for the budget for CA and to trim down on the overpopulated jails as well as put your money where it counts towards rehabilitation. I don't know if I think that its a good thing to drop drug offenses down to a misdemeanor and this could bring different changes, like Law Enforcement stated, "it may be hard to prosecute date rape drugs as well as enforcing  gun convictions."  I agree. I do believe that some offenses are better to not have a long jail sentence and approaching offenses with a rehabilitation approach I see as a great approach that also offers benefits to long term changes.

more...
Melia Markell's comment, November 5, 2014 9:20 PM
I think this can be a potentially great shift to help alleviate some of the pressures that California faces in regards to crowding and overpopulation of prisons. I agree with the statement that was made that when people are not feeling terrified, they're more willing to back off of tough-crime policies. I think that this can be a shift that many states around the US can start to adopt as it doesn't put major criminals out on the streets, but just lowering offenses of things like shoplifting, to a lower offense instead of crowding our prisons with these misdemeanors.
Brittney Ward's comment, November 13, 2014 1:53 PM
Karmen, I agree that this will be good for CA budget when it comes to $$ spent on corrections. My only reservations about this is like mentioned it will become harder to convicted drug related crimes at a felony status. Also a concern CA is going to have to address is making sure they have programs available for rehabilitation services. more often than not drug users in jail receive some sort of court mandated rehabilitation, making sure they keep up the efforts to rehabilitate could be a challenge.