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Rescooped by Maria Guadalupe Sutherland from Police Problems and Policy
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Medical marijuana and 'the entourage effect'

Medical marijuana and 'the entourage effect' | Criminal Justice | Scoop.it
There are more than 480 natural components in the cannabis plant. Scientists believe all these likely exert a therapeutic effect, more than any single one.

Via Rob Duke
Maria Guadalupe Sutherland's insight:

I read the story of Charlette's Web and it made me cry.  As a parent I would do anything to help my child even if it is against everything I believe in.  I've been a law abiding citizen all of my adult life.  What I don't understand is why if scientists are saying and we are witnessing the medical and positive effects of marijuana on this little girl, more research is not focused on analyzing further the 480 components that are found in the plant cannabis.  If there are ways to extract those compounds that can offer relief to suffering patients lets do what we can to support that.  I think we've closed our minds to the positives and only concentrated on the negative effects and put all those that are breaking the law for smoking a joint occasionally behind bars.  I think it is time to approach this issue with an open mind and see that the plant offers more than THC and that we are not just trying to get people "high", but rather help them live a normal life with less pain or possibly no pain at all.

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Hawaii Law Lets Police Have Sex With Hookers - NBC News

Hawaii Law Lets Police Have Sex With Hookers - NBC News | Criminal Justice | Scoop.it
HONOLULU — Honolulu police officers have urged lawmakers to keep an exemption in state law that allows undercover officers to have sex with prostitutes durin...

Via Rob Duke
Maria Guadalupe Sutherland's insight:

I'm shocked to say the least!  How can a police department rationalize the tramatization of those victims they swore to protect?  The "ends justify the means" sounds like bunch of ***** to me.  Cops have been around forever and they've managed to do their jobs regarding prostetution and sex trafficking without asking for an exemption to law from the state.  Undercover officers who start abusing the very same people they are supposed to be protecting is only going to open the door for more unethical conduct.  This is completely unacceptable behavior and I hope that the state of Hawaii legislation can see through this requet for what it really is...AN INVITATION FOR DISASTER!

 

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New York City to pay man $6.4 million for wrongful conviction

New York City to pay man $6.4 million for wrongful conviction | Criminal Justice | Scoop.it
A man whose murder conviction was overturned after he served 22 years in prison will receive a $6.4 million settlement from New York City.

Via Rob Duke
Maria Guadalupe Sutherland's insight:

I don’t think any amount of money is enough for having lost his freedom for 22 years! I’m sure the money will be nice, like the article states, the man will have the money needed to cover his medical expenses and have enough after legal fees to not have to worry about money until he goes to a better place.  He has a lot of things to do and places to see and I hope he gets a chance to enjoy some of the money and that not all of it goes to his medical bill because after being looked up for so long, he needs to have some fun and enjoy whatever is left of his life.  It’s sad that the police back then didn’t do their job right and that an innocent man went to jail.  I know that whoever didn’t follow up on all the leads back then are not going to be the ones actually paying for it, but in the long run I think one way or another we all get what we deserve especially when we negligently do something in the line of duty and take short cuts and mess around with the rights and freedoms of others.

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Carolyn C.'s comment, February 26, 2014 8:24 PM
Wow, no amount of money can ever replace what the state did the this poor man. Jail for 22 years and innocent. I think the man who set him up should be severely punished. This witness was trained to say that this is the man who committed the crime. There were also many leads that weren't followed which is another big mistake that was made. This is one of many reasons why I am against the death penalty as well, this man was innocent and wrongfully convicted.
Shasta Pomeroy's comment, March 2, 2014 6:05 PM
It is truly sad that this man had to serves prison time that, according to recent testimony, he did not even commit. By finding out the testimony of others aware of the crime shows that they were coaxed to frame this man as the offender. This is an example of why it is so important to make sure that investigators are given a proper amount of time in which analyze crime scene and exhaust all options to make sure that the correct individual is convicted.
amber michelle kittelson's curator insight, March 13, 2014 11:10 AM

what i learned about this topic is that before you put a person in prison, you should make sure that they are innocent becasue you could be putting an inoccent person in prison for a crime they did not commit.

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Florida trooper who stopped speeding cop sues after alleged harassment

Florida trooper who stopped speeding cop sues after alleged harassment | Criminal Justice | Scoop.it
Florida Highway Patrol Trooper Donna Jane Watts was on routine patrol early one morning when a Miami police car whizzed past at speeds that would eventually top 120 mph.

Via Rob Duke
Maria Guadalupe Sutherland's insight:

What total disregard for policy procedures and privacy matters!  I'm sure the officers knew quite well that accessing Watt's driving record even if they didn't intend on selling her information was completely immoral and unethical.  Yes, I understand the banning of the officers together in times of need to back each other up and have each other's back, but in this case they were completely outraged that Watt had taken action and arrested an officer for speeding.  Had that been you or me speeing to get to our job, we might have just quit because with speeds of 120 miles per hour you and I would have been arrested and booked.  The officers should uphold and he held to the same laws that the rest of the citizens have to follow.  I've been late to work before, and sped and paid the tickets.  Other times I've been late and I get to hear my boss repremind me for my lack of responsibility.  Officers should have to do no less than the rest of us.  I hope the rest of the officers got what they deserved for accessing information that should only be accessed on a need be basis which this obviously wasn't.  I'm going to have to look this up because now I want to know what the outcome was.

 

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Koty Emery's comment, February 17, 2014 12:41 AM
I fully agree with Maria with this. The trooper was in the right for pulling the officer over. Recklessly speeding endangers others without reason (and being late to a job is not a valid reason for going 120 mph) should be punished. I find the actions of the fellow troopers who sent threats and sat idling near her house appalling. It is unfortunate that a trooper had to be relocated for doing her job.
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Former ‘sex victim’ arrested in human trafficking operation

AT 14, Stephanie Reynes became a victim of human trafficking.While still a freshman in high school, she was prostituted by a woman who sold her to an old American inside a hotel in an upscale dist...

Via Rob Duke
Maria Guadalupe Sutherland's insight:

I'm not very sensative to the excuse of "poverty" driving someone to do what Reyes did especially having been a victim herself 10 years ago.  There's a lot of resources available if you just ask for help especiallyw with two little kids at home.  I was poor at one time and with two little boys myself, I was dependent of the government welfare system for almost 2 years. I did everything within my power to get out of the system as fast as I could and provide for my children.  There's no excuse for Reyes becoming a pimp herself and putting kids thru the nightmare of being a sex victim just because you can't make ends meet.  I would beg at the corner for money before doing something like that to a child!

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Shasta Pomeroy's comment, February 9, 2014 9:09 PM
The sex trade is a serious crime and leaves many of its victims to become offenders themselves. This vicious cycle that happens to some individual is a major problem seen throughout the worlds currently. The fact that law enforcement is actively seeking and saving individuals who have been harmed by this crime are helping to stop the cycle of sex trafficking.
Robert Boutang's comment, February 13, 2014 3:46 AM
<br>One would think that Reyes being a victim herself would be very compassionate and reach out and help and help victims. Reyes should be analyzed see if she is fit to be a mother to her children. This is a very serious crime throughout the world. Reyes is just adding to a terrible world problem. She should be severely punished for this crime. <br><br>
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Atlanta man shatters coast-to-coast 'Cannonball Run' speed record

Atlanta man shatters coast-to-coast 'Cannonball Run' speed record | Criminal Justice | Scoop.it
An Atlanta Lamborghini salesman set a coast-to-coast "Cannonball" speed record of 28 hours and 50 minutes in a souped-up Mercedes.

Via Rob Duke
Maria Guadalupe Sutherland's insight:

WoW! that sounds fun.  Very risky indeed but I'm glad to read that he took a lot of safety precautions.  Even though he hopes no other lunatics will attempt to break his record, I think he might have inspired one or two out there.  I'm sure we will read about someone else in a few years who tries to break his record.

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Angie Crow's comment, November 5, 2013 8:25 PM
This is extremely dangerous and the fact that there is an article written about it is ridiculous, to me. I think that they are getting recognition for breaking the law, which to me is wrong. It is unbelievable that they did not receive a ticket at all for their reckless behavior. Someone could have seriously been injured if something had gone wrong. You can't predict what is going to happen in traffic so in my opinion these three individuals were extremely lucky. It should certainly not be something that is attempted again by anyone!<br>
Kelsey Scott's comment, November 7, 2013 3:11 PM
This is one of those things that we all know is wrong by the books but we're all kind of awed by. They obviously put a lot of planning into it, it might not have been a totally reasonable plan but they did plan. This wasn't just a few idiots in a fast car, they knew what they were getting into. Props to them for getting it done safely, though it would definitely be stupid for anyone else to try it now.
Sawyer Skiba's comment, November 10, 2013 2:07 AM
This is mind blowing. This has to be one of the dumbest people I have ever heard of. First, driving that far and that fast is dangerous. Then, add that he has admitted to it, filmed it, and posted video. I have heard multiple times of similar things like this happening and the person committing the act gets arrested. He also admits to going 150 MPH in numerous areas. While I agree it was probably a blast, this is one of the situations you may want to limit the filming and publicity.
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Mobster ordered hit on NYPD officer because cop “dared” to marry his ex-wife: prosecutor 

Mobster ordered hit on NYPD officer because cop “dared” to marry his ex-wife: prosecutor  | Criminal Justice | Scoop.it
Joel (Joe Waverly) Cacace ordered the execution of NYPD Officer Ralp Dols in 1997 because the cop had married the mobster's former wife, Assistant Brooklyn U.S.

Via Rob Duke
Maria Guadalupe Sutherland's insight:

It's hard to believe that this mobster can still order hits from prison while serving a 20 year sentence for killing a prosecutor. I would imagine that he be kept at an arm's reach.  All his conversations should be motiored and so shold his visits and all his outgoing and incoming mail too.  This might have prevented the killing of such a young cop in 1997.  Divorce means you need to let the other person go and the police officer that "dared" to marry this mobsters' ex-wife should be handed down another 20 to life for killing a police officer.

 

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BridgetM's comment, December 4, 2013 6:43 PM
Are mafia's still around? I thought they were replaced by gangs long ago. This article left a lot of information out, so I would like to have seen some more evidence, but these are serious allegations. I'm not sure why someone would care so much about what their ex was doing, but it seems like this guy holds a grudge.
Zach White's comment, December 20, 2013 7:04 PM
His amount of power is rather impressive from behind bars.
Dana Hoffman's comment, December 20, 2013 7:28 PM
Read Melissa's comment, I agree w/her 100%
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Nevada school shooting: Teacher killed, two students wounded

Nevada school shooting: Teacher killed, two students wounded | Criminal Justice | Scoop.it
A student opened fire at a Nevada middle school with a handgun he took from his parents, a source said. The shooter killed a teacher and wounded two students.

Via Rob Duke
Maria Guadalupe Sutherland's insight:

It's so sad to read stories like this.  I hurt for the lives that were lost, the math teacher and the gunman and their families that now have to re-adjust their lives to live through this horrible nightmare.  As the article states, there has been way too many shootings at schools all across the county.  Is it a gun control issue? Do we need more regulation?  Is it a lack of parental guidance, I mean how did this kid get a hold of loaded gun?  My heart goes out to all involved in this tragedy.That poor marine served in a war zone various times only to come home and get shot and killed in an event that we might never fully come to understand. 

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Kelly Logue's comment, November 1, 2013 1:48 AM
I don't think that for the most part we will ever truly understand why people do the things that we do. For the most part we just classify them as mentally unstable. My heart goes out to the teacher who tried to help out the situation and the students that were both terrified and injured. What's unfortunate along with this haneous crime is the fact that he took his own life. Therefore we will not be able to study and learn from this outbreak this kid had.
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Move over, Proust: New theory explains where old memories go

Move over, Proust: New theory explains where old memories go | Criminal Justice | Scoop.it
Research out of Johns Hopkins reveals why some memories disappear, some remain, and others blend with fiction

Via Rob Duke
Maria Guadalupe Sutherland's insight:

I like this article because there's quite a few memories that are starting to 'fade away' and my kids and I have discussed them loudly at times because they have to do with their dad. 
We debated wether red or blue were my husbands' favorite colors and in what order and it made me sad when our two older ones agreed that I was wrong and made fun of me for getting old and forgetting their dad's favorite color. Some things in my life I don't care to remember and I wish I could forget, like the knock on the door when the chaplin told me my husband was killed in the war.  I want to keep focus on all the positve and wonderful memories we did share so I can one day tell our 6 year old that never met him what an incredible man his father was.  I will keep that in mind next time I decide to pull up a memory, to do it as often as possible and to remember as many details as possible to activiate as many neurons each time so I never forget my beloved husband.

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Rob Duke's curator insight, October 17, 2013 2:18 PM

How false memories might be made....

Ashley Bartolowits's comment, October 20, 2013 1:52 PM
This is a fascinating explanation of how we are all able to change our memories. This new theory seems like a very succinct way of integrating the competing content versus age based theories of memory. Assuming that this theory is true, it seems like this could have further implications for manipulating memories. What I mean is, how ethical or accurate is it to ask a witness to recall an event over and over again if evidence suggests that the more the memory is revisited the more it may change? Frankly, this whole topic is a bit unsettling. It is hard to admit to yourself that what you remember may not be real.
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Biker: 'My Intention Was Never to Make Him Stop'

Biker: 'My Intention Was Never to Make Him Stop' | Criminal Justice | Scoop.it
Christopher Cruz, the 28-year-old biker accused of starting a bloody encounter between a group of bikers and an SUV driver on a New York highway, says he does not feel responsible for the attack.

Via Rob Duke
Maria Guadalupe Sutherland's insight:

This is completely insane!  We actually discussed this incicent in my ethics class this morning.  The off-duty cops only came forth after they knew of the exsistence of the tape from what I understand.  Ethically and morally those cops had a duty to stop the rest of the bikers from beating the driver.  Once they saw things getting out of control they should have exercerted their authority and stopped the abuse of the driver.  Cruz's interpretation of what is seen on the video is only a pretense defence because he got busted doing something so reckless and dangerous.  I hope that all those involved are held accountable for what they put the family of the SUV through.

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Rashaad's comment, October 12, 2013 10:27 PM
As some of the other members of this discussion mentioned, I do not know either what to think of this case. It sounds like both sides of the story are having a different version and point of view on the case, and I guess the best way how to resolve this would ask the under-covered policemen what really happened over there. One interesting point is that the undercovered cops didn't do anything. On the other hand, if they did, the problem is that they would probably disclose their real identity...
Kelly Logue's comment, October 13, 2013 6:01 PM
This definitely shows how forceful a big group can be and how things can get out of hand fast. This reminds me of the bellingham riot that happened just last night where a huge party was happening but then SWAT was called in because people were tearing down street signs and throwing things at cops. Im sure some of the people that were there don't feel as if any of it was their fault, but they were still there witnessing what was going on and not doing anything to help prevent it.
Joshua Matheny's comment, October 18, 2013 8:50 PM
I completely take the SUV driver's side in this case. The bike gang and the mentality that went with it was violent and disruptive, the SUV driver simply had a hard time driving near all of those bikers who were obviously being dangerous in the road as the vehicle hit one of them moving in front of him.
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What can the Dutch teach U.S. about selling pot? | Video | PBS NewsHour | PBS

What can the Dutch teach U.S. about selling pot? | Video | PBS NewsHour | PBS | Criminal Justice | Scoop.it
As Colorado and Washington begin selling legal marijuana, questions remain about the practical process of changing drug policy. NewsHour travels to the Netherlands -- the one nation that's been openly selling pot for over forty years -- to see what might be in store for the United States. Correspondent Wiliam Brangham and producer Saskia de Melker report. Continue reading →

Via Rob Duke
Maria Guadalupe Sutherland's insight:

Even though the Dutch system of legalizing marijuana is not perfect it has had a few positive outcomes and the United States, especially Colorado and Washington and possibly Alaska will be wise to try and figure out a way to implement and capitalize on what the Dutch have done.  Reducing HIV and other health related issues has been a huge success there.  They've also managed to reduce the number of arrests due to small quantities of marijuana which usually are the cause for an initial arrest which creates a never ending cycle of prior criminal activities.  Here in Alaska if marijuana was legalized I think that a lot of our youth would not be in the detention center.  Alcohol is in my opinion a more serious problem in our society that needs to be address.  Marijuana's prohibition has made it more appealing because it gives youth the sence of "superiority" when they know they are breaking the law and getting away with it.  I don't think it will as fun for them to smoke it if it becomes legal and very expensive.

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A Lonely Boy In The Freezing Cold Without A Jacket. Watch People's Reaction.

A Lonely Boy In The Freezing Cold Without A Jacket. Watch People's Reaction. | Criminal Justice | Scoop.it
Would you give John your jacket?

Via Rob Duke
Maria Guadalupe Sutherland's insight:

I would give my jacket to him in a second!   A few of my friends and I have been doing a thing we are calling it “pay it forward Friday” so every Friday we do something nice for a stranger.  Sometimes I pay for the food of someone in a drive-thru behind me, the other day at Safeway I paid for a kid in front of me who was purchasing a case of Gatorade.  It’s never really anything huge that’s going to break my piggy bank, but it feels nice to be able to do something that I can afford to do for someone I don’t know.  They may appreciate it or they may not, but I do it anyway.  I would have taken that kid to Fred Meyers and purchased a jacket for him right away.  We need to build a better world and we can start with our actions and the way we choose to treat others in situations as the one depicted in the video. 

 

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Rob Duke's curator insight, February 21, 2014 1:34 PM

The greatest practical truth that I can impart to my classes is this: it's a team sport, but often without a team captain.  The most important role we play in the justice field is to be a servant leader at whatever level of the community we can be.  As a servant leader, our main task is not directing (though sometimes we do this), but it is to build capacity in the community so that everyone helps one another a little bit more.  This is the magic, because one kindness leads to another.  I found in one town, that a dedication to simply  wave at the kids led to more buy in from everyone for building civil society in the community.  So, if you do nothing else, build the team.

Joshua Livingston's comment, February 21, 2014 6:33 PM
I really liked it. These kinds of moments when people are able to see others give. Its one of those moments that can warm the heart. Especially when most think that the world is going down the toilet.
Carolyn C.'s comment, February 26, 2014 8:46 PM
This video somewhat restored my faith in humanity. This is what I expected people to do but the beginning of the video made me nervous that people weren't going to help the little boy and then they eventually came around. I find it very interesting what you said about how it's a team sport without a captain. It seems like there individuals who don't know each other working towards somewhat of a common goal. This is a great analogy.
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Bill to arm Alaska village safety officers advances

Bill to arm Alaska village safety officers advances | Criminal Justice | Scoop.it
JUNEAU, Alaska — The House Finance Committee on Tuesday advanced a bill that would allow for village public safety officers to carry a firearm while on duty.

Via Rob Duke
Maria Guadalupe Sutherland's insight:

We are currently discussing this issue in Justice 340, Rural Justice in Alaska and I'm not certain how I feel about it.  I tend to go back and forth on this issue because if I was the VPSO and I'm unarmed and show up to a fight and they have firearms, what the heck do I do? I would run and hide before they shoot me!  However, if I was armed I might be able to get them to relinquish their guns if they see the possibility of me using mine, but if I don't have one I can't negotiate.  On the other hand, the program has been around for a lot of years and even if the crime keeps the pace that it is at right now in the villages they've only lost 3 officers total I believe since the inception of the program so those are also good odds that most villagers are able to be removed, cuffed, or otherwise detained by VPSO's without the use of a firearm all these years so why start now and add more fuel to the fire (fights)!

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Sawyer Skiba's comment, March 11, 2014 8:11 PM
I am kind of torn when it comes to this subject. I believe that the VPSO's can be placed in life threatening positions at any point. They are a form of law enforcement and can be treated as such by those who hate law enforcement. I believe they should be trained in the proper use of deadly force and should be allowed to carry a fire arm. I believe only two VPSO's have died in the line of duty, and although that is a small number, I wonder if that number would be different if they had been armed. I do think that if they start arming VPSO's, they will need to make sure only mentally stable and mature officers are equipped. The standards for VPSO's at the moment are much lower then other Law enforcement standards. If we were to arm them, the standard of character and ability would have to go up to make sure they could deal with the added pressure, power, and responsibility.
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ItMother-daughter duo accused in long erm PFD scam

ItMother-daughter duo accused in long erm PFD scam | Criminal Justice | Scoop.it
Carolyn Owens faces 26 charges, all but two of which are felonies, for allegedly filing false Permanent Fund Dividend applications for more than two decades. Her daughter also faces nine charges for allowing Carolyn to submit applications on her behalf.

Via Rob Duke
Maria Guadalupe Sutherland's insight:

It is unfortunate that people feel "entitled" to receive this check even after they decided to leave the state.  I think if the government was able to spend more time, energy, and resources they would be able to find out that this is a much bigger problem especially with the military community. I think a lot of the members of the military apply for the PFD knowing full well that they have no intention of staying here indefinitely, to the contrary, they are counting the days until their deployment ends.  I have first hand knowledge on this issue, a lot of people come into the legal office asking for advice on whether they should or not apply.  If you're honestly willing to stay and make Alaska your home, then go ahead and apply, but if not then don't do it.  Personally I don't think it's worth any legal ramifications it could bring about for simply trying to apply and get a check you know you're no longer entitled to receive.

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A CHP officer cuffed a firefighter trying to rescue accident victims

A CHP officer cuffed a firefighter trying to rescue accident victims | Criminal Justice | Scoop.it
A long-simmering feud between San Diego-area fire departments and police came to a head Tuesday when an officer arrested a firefighter for not moving his truck as he was trying to rescue victims from an accident.

Via Rob Duke
Maria Guadalupe Sutherland's insight:

It's law enforcement people like this CHP officer that puts a bad light on the rest of law enforcement.  Firefighters should be treated with a little bit more respect than what the rest of us get from police.  They too, put their lives on the line as first responders.  this officer needs to be reprimanded and he should apologize to the firefighter at the very least.

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Recidivism down, treatment up for Alaska convicts, officials say

Recidivism down, treatment up for Alaska convicts, officials say | Criminal Justice | Scoop.it
FAIRBANKS — Alaska convicts have been less likely to reoffend in recent years and more likely to complete in-prison substance abuse treatment programs, state officials told lawmakers on Monday.

Via Rob Duke
Maria Guadalupe Sutherland's insight:

I'm glad to read that recedivism is down a little over 3%.  that is great news.  However, recently I've had the misfortune to have had one of my son's sentenced to serve 5 days in jail for his first DUI (hopefully his one and only).  He told me the correctional facility is so crowed they have 3 men sleeping in 1 man cells.  After his first night he was given a "boat" a thin piece of plastic looking thing he said and a blanket to go sleep in the gym with a handfull of other inmates.  He was on his best behavior ever I imagine because they released him after serving 63 hours, yes he kept count of each minute he was in there.  There's a serious problem with our crowded jails and something needs to be done to keep those less serious offender from re offending so that the recidivism rate can continue to go down and so that we are trying to treat these people while they're out of jail so that they are able to functiion in our community by legal means.

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Melissa's curator insight, November 14, 2013 9:12 PM

The sign of lowering the number of reoffenders in the jail system is a positive move towards a much needed issue.   The funds given to programs to help and treat offenders when in jail and also while on probation has a postive outcome but still does not fully address the real problem of overcrowding in the alaska jail system.

Jonathan Reed's comment, January 27, 2014 3:16 AM
This is what it comes down too. Shoving people into prisons isn't going to solve the underlining issues that press the community. What needs to be done is that programs need to be created that help and assist newly released inmates in finding jobs and maintain them. Helping them find stable residence and helping them with their personal issues (counseling) are just a few of the things that can be done. But what Alaska is doing to great and I'm surprised that more states aren't doing it. This entire article can be summed up by restated what was said by Alaska Department of Correction Deputy Commissioner Ron Taylor, "the state began to seriously look at recidivism rates with the start of the 2007 report and worked to increase the availability of in-prison treatment as well as provide better services for inmates once they are released. That work has paid off, he said and the completion rates for in-prison substance abuse treatment rose to 65 percent in 2013, up from 45 percent in 2010."
Rob Duke's comment, January 27, 2014 3:19 AM
Agreed: it's not sustainable for one thing and it's just not effective for another.
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The Subway Gangs of Mexico City | VICE United States

The Subway Gangs of Mexico City | VICE United States | Criminal Justice | Scoop.it
Local gangs known as combos made up of reguetoneros (“reggaeton fans”) in their late teens and early 20s haunt the subway stations of Mexico City.

Via Rob Duke
Maria Guadalupe Sutherland's insight:

It looks disturbing to see such a large group "reggaeton fans" getting together to form a familia because their family unity is one they don't feel like they belong to.  I've been going to Mexico City since April 2010 a few times I've been with my (3yr old, now 6) and sometimes with two of my boys the other was 18 in 2010.  We took the subway a few times and not once did we encounter any of these groups.  In 2010 the World Cup was going on too and the streets of "El Distrito Federal" (Federal District) were extremely full and roudy but not once did any of these groups in this ad cause any problems I don't remember seeing them.  I did like that the subway personnel were willing to provide the transportation on the weekends by emptying the last  cart in order to avoid issues with the rest of the passengers.  I think that was a really good sign.  I was also happy to hear that not all of them are high school drop outs and that not all of them gather to do drugs, but instead are just looking for a common area where they can all enjoy listening to Daddy Janky and the rest of the regeatones!

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Colby Wallace's comment, October 20, 2013 8:27 PM
These style of gangs are a very different from the general american gang member. The fascination with the type of music as the factor of gang initiation is interesting. These gangs are more concerned with partying and living the life.
Brix Hahn's comment, October 21, 2013 2:32 AM
At first I thought it was really cool that there was a sort of trending epidemic of young people getting together and gathering in public, but the more of the video I watched the more uncomfortable I became. I think it’s very nerve-racking knowing that so many young people are basically willing and ready to serve a their “leaders” hand whenever he or she calls upon them. Now, I don’t mean this in a negative light at all, but just thinking about it, that’s a lot of power.
Brix Hahn's comment, October 21, 2013 2:32 AM
At first I thought it was really cool that there was a sort of trending epidemic of young people getting together and gathering in public, but the more of the video I watched the more uncomfortable I became. I think it’s very nerve-racking knowing that so many young people are basically willing and ready to serve a their “leaders” hand whenever he or she calls upon them. Now, I don’t mean this in a negative light at all, but just thinking about it, that’s a lot of power.
Rescooped by Maria Guadalupe Sutherland from Criminology and Economic Theory
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Crowdfunding Rules Set to Become Even More Indulgent

Crowdfunding Rules Set to Become Even More Indulgent | Criminal Justice | Scoop.it
Under an SEC proposal, businesses won’t have to verify that investors meet income and net worth criteria

Via Rob Duke
Maria Guadalupe Sutherland's insight:

I can't believe that the SEC is willing to put investors at such high risk of investing in an effort to create more jobs.  If people are already saying that these companies will probably not succeed why are they being allowed to take money from potential investors like you and me?  Maybe the SEC needs to take some more time and re-evaluate the possible ramifications of the possible scams and loses that could result from this.

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Dogs Are People, Too

Dogs Are People, Too | Criminal Justice | Scoop.it
By looking directly at their brains and bypassing the constraints of behaviorism, M.R.I.’s can tell us about dogs’ internal states.

Via Rob Duke
Maria Guadalupe Sutherland's insight:

I've never been a dog person! I love cats and I have 3 of them right now.  When my husband died he left a dog, Shadow which he loved dearly.  That dog waited and waited for him by the door for what seemed like forever.  He jumped everytime the front door was opened and you could almost sense his disappointment when he realized that it wasn't my husband coming home.  They know who their owner is and they know who treats them right and wrong.  Just like when you're a kid and you cringe away in fear so do dogs when and cats when you've been mean to them.  One of the cats I have is not really mine it belongs to my oldest son but he cant have him in his apartment.  This stupid cat is quiet as can be, but the minute the door opens I swear he smells Omar, my son coming in and he won't shut up until Omar goes into the cat's room and grabs him and pets him.  there's a little bit of human in them.

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Joshua Livingston's comment, October 7, 2013 10:46 PM
For me plain and simple, I love dogs and I don’t doubt that animals have the most basic of emotions. I can’t say that they have as complex emotions as us people, but anyone who’s ever owned an animal can see that they show feelings. When you play with them they get happy and energetic, when you correct them they get scared and when you feel threatened they will protect.
Mary Grubbs's comment, October 16, 2013 1:43 AM
I went to a friends house a few years back and I had not been to her house since she married. Her new husband already had a dog, but I had not met him. My dad had just died and I needed a friend and was really upset, crying, and their dog came right up to me and put his paw on my knee and I was like, WOW, I think he can feel my pain or at least sense that I was upset and in some way was trying to comfort me. Dogs can have a great sense of instinct.
Rachel groff's curator insight, September 17, 10:13 AM

This is really interesting his we can perceive what goes on in a dog's mind by scanning their brain.

Rescooped by Maria Guadalupe Sutherland from Criminology and Economic Theory
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Dan Walters: New California immigration laws could increase chaos | State News | FresnoBee.com

Dan Walters: New California immigration laws could increase chaos | State News | FresnoBee.com | Criminal Justice | Scoop.it
Dan Walters: California sows confusion in effort to semi-legalize its illegal immigrants

Via Rob Duke
Maria Guadalupe Sutherland's insight:

True! CA is creating a very conflicting issue for employers by punishing them using state laws for discriminating against immigrants and then the federal government can also turn around and sanction the employer as well, possibly costing him/her their way of earning a living.  Both Arizona and California should wait and let the federal government deal with immigration.

 

 

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Rashaad's comment, October 11, 2013 6:00 PM
This article fascinates me from several reasons... the first reason is: how an illegal immigrant can get a driver's license? If he comes to the local DMV and they are aware that he/she is illegal, how come they don't report it and even issue the license? Also, the reasoning is that they need to drive to work - as mentioned in the article - it is a federal crime to employ an illegal immigrant - why would you give them a license to drive somewhere to break the federal law? I do not doubt the point that they are a necessity for the economy, since they supply a cheap labor force. On the other hand, I do not feel that it is good that the government "closes its eyes" and acting like it is alright, There must be rules to be followed, the only question is the amount of restrictions and what to do with the illegals already living in the US... The advantage for economy is good in sense of cheap labor, but if they all become legal residents - with Obamacare, unemployment and social security support - the costs might be even bigger than the benefits...