Crimes of the 1930s by MP
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My Letter

My Letter

Mortez phillips's insight:

Dear Mom,

 

Hey, how have you been? I am not doing okay. All the tragic and damage going on like the dust flying In the school windows messing up everything for us we had to school in the dark , at least the teacher tried but we really couldn’t see anything that was going on because of all the damage and  dust that was flying I really miss you guys , how my sister doing ? hope she’s ok tell her I really miss her and the little smile  , hows my brother doing has he been bad ? hope not tell hi I also love and miss him all this is crazy that’s going on up here I honestly want to come home to my family every sinse I moved up here they have been playing weird funny sounding music well , hows grandpa back doing sense he stop working because of the injury ? hope he’s doing okay let him know I hope he doing okay  and I miss him , tell him I cant go a day without  thinking bout him sense that injury  , is uncle  doing ? every sense he got out of jail ? hope he’s up choosing the right choice even though its hard for him to stay out of trouble , I really hope all you guys are doing way much better then me because its hell over were im at  I pray that I pull threw.

 

 

Love, Mortez

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Nathan Cushenbery-Andrews's comment, February 15, 2013 2:50 PM
Where are the other 10 topics?
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Primary Document 2 First Account Reprint Riding with Bonnie and Clyde by W.D. Jones

Primary Document 2   First Account Reprint     Riding with Bonnie and Clyde by W.D. Jones | Crimes of the 1930s by MP | Scoop.it
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Mortez phillips's comment, January 25, 2013 9:29 AM
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Mortez phillips's comment, January 31, 2013 9:32 AM
These are photographs taken back then. These are photos of Bonnie and Clyde. They were bank robbers. They ran from the law. They liked to pose with their guns. They ended up dying by running into the law.
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Current Event 2 EXCLUSIVE: Diamond Reflects On Past With Crime Mob, Says Reunion Is Possible

Current Event 2        EXCLUSIVE: Diamond Reflects On Past With Crime Mob, Says Reunion Is Possible | Crimes of the 1930s by MP | Scoop.it
(AllHipHop News) Atlanta rapper Diamond is busy preparing to release her new mixtape “Street Life,” in addition to her solo album, which is slated to land in stores next year. The 24-ye...
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Mortez phillips's comment, January 25, 2013 9:30 AM
Cornell Notes on this Current Event:
Mortez phillips's comment, January 31, 2013 9:36 AM
This is a current event. This is from the allhiphopnews.com. This is talking about a mob that talks about the crime mob. Sometimes mobs are associated in music. It is about music that talks about street life. It is talking about the rapper Diamond. It is not okay to have mob life in music.
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Topic Website 3 Mob film - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Mob films[1] — or gangster films — are a subgenre of American crime films dealing with organized crime, often specifically with the Mafia. Especially in early mob films, there is considerable overlap with film noir.

The American movie The Black Hand (1906) is thought to be the earliest surviving gangster film.[2] Though mob films had their roots in such silent films, the genre in its most durable form was defined in the early 1930s. It owed its innovations to the social and economic instability occasioned by the Great Depression, which galvanized the organized crime subculture.[3] The failure of honest hard work and careful investment to ensure financial security led to the circumstances reflected in the explosion of mob films in Hollywood[4] and to their immense popularity in a society disillusioned with the American way of life.

The years 1931 and 1932 saw the genre produce three enduring classics: Warner Bros.' Little Caesar and The Public Enemy, which made screen icons out of Edward G. Robinson and James Cagney, and Howard Hawks' Scarface starring Paul Muni, which offered a dark psychological analysis of a fictionalized Al Capone[5] and launched the film career of George Raft. These films chronicle the quick rise, and equally quick downfall, of three young, violent criminals, and represent the genre in its purest form before moral pressure would force it to change and evolve. Though the gangster in each film would face a violent downfall which was designed to remind the viewers of the consequences of crime,[6] audiences were often able to identify with the charismatic anti-hero. Those suffering from the Depression were able to relate to the gangster character who worked hard to earn his place and success in the world, only to have it all taken away from him.[7]

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Topic Website 1 Pretty Boy Floyd - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Charles Arthur "Pretty Boy" Floyd (February 3, 1904 – October 22, 1934) was an American bank robber. He operated in the Midwest and West South Central States, and his criminal exploits gained heavy press coverage in the 1930s. Like most other prominent outlaws of that era, he was killed by policemen. He remains a familiar figure in American popular culture, sometimes seen as notorious, but at other times viewed as a tragic figure, partly a victim of hard times.

Floyd was born in Bartow County, Georgia. He grew up in Oklahoma after moving there with his family from Georgia in 1911, and spent considerable time in nearby Kansas, Arkansas and Missouri. He was first arrested at age 18 after he stole $3.50 in coins from a local post office. Three years later he was arrested for a payroll robbery on September 16, 1925 in St. Louis, Missouri and was sentenced to five years in prison, of which he served three and a half.[1][2][3]

When paroled, Floyd vowed that he would never see the inside of another prison. Entering into partnerships with more established criminals in the Kansas City underworld, he committed a series of bank robberies over the next several years; it was during this period that he acquired the nickname "Pretty Boy." According to one account, when the payroll master targeted in a robbery described the three perpetrators to the police, he referred to Floyd as "a mere boy — a pretty boy with apple cheeks." Like his contemporary Baby Face Nelson, Floyd hated his nickname.[1]

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Primary Document 3 Wanted Poster Clyde Barrow Wanted Poster, 1933 - Texas State Library and Archives Commission

Primary Document 3   Wanted Poster     Clyde Barrow Wanted Poster, 1933 - Texas State Library and Archives Commission | Crimes of the 1930s by MP | Scoop.it
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Mortez phillips's comment, January 25, 2013 9:30 AM
Annotate 7 sentences:
Mortez phillips's comment, January 31, 2013 9:32 AM
This is a wanted poster. It was made back then. This is an archived photo of the poster. There is Clyde and another guy on the poster. This is talking about how crime was back then. It took place in the 1930s.
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Primary Document 1 Picture File:Bonnieclyde f.jpg - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Primary Document 1  Picture    File:Bonnieclyde f.jpg - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia | Crimes of the 1930s by MP | Scoop.it
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Mortez phillips's comment, January 25, 2013 9:30 AM
Annotate 7 sentences:
Mortez phillips's comment, January 31, 2013 9:33 AM
This is a photograph. It was taken in the 1930s. This is a photo of Bonnie and Clyde. They would go on crime sprees. They are posing by their car. They may not have owned that car, I don't know. They are looking proud of themselves.
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Current Event 1 Former Bonanno boss Basciano headed to Supermax

Current Event 1        Former Bonanno boss Basciano headed to Supermax | Crimes of the 1930s by MP | Scoop.it
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Mortez phillips's comment, January 25, 2013 9:30 AM
Cornell Notes on this Current Event:
Mortez phillips's comment, January 31, 2013 9:34 AM
This is a current event. This person is a modern day mob boss. Mobs exist in our country today. He is a boss in the US. He is getting in and out of trouble all the time. He is wearing sunglasses and looks like a boss.
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Topic Website 2 Bonnie and Clyde - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Bonnie Elizabeth Parker (October 1, 1910 – May 23, 1934) and Clyde Chestnut Barrow (March 24, 1909 – May 23, 1934) were well-known outlaws, robbers, and criminals who traveled the Central United States with their gang during the Great Depression. The "Barrow Gang" included at times Buck Barrow, Blanche Barrow, Raymond Hamilton, W.D. Jones, Joe Palmer, Ralph Fults, and Henry Methvin. Their exploits captured the attention of the American public during the "public enemy era" between 1931 and 1934. Though known today for his dozen-or-so bank robberies, Barrow in fact preferred to rob small stores or rural gas stations. The gang is believed to have killed at least nine police officers and committed several civilian murders. The couple themselves were eventually ambushed and killed in Louisiana by law officers. Their reputation was cemented in American pop folklore by Arthur Penn's 1967 film Bonnie and Clyde.[1]

Even during their lifetimes, the couple's depiction in the press was at considerable odds with the hardscrabble reality of their life on the road—particularly in the case of Parker. Though she was present at a hundred or more felonies during her two years as Barrow's companion,[2] she was not the machine gun-wielding cartoon killer portrayed in the newspapers, newsreels, and pulp detective magazines of the day. Gang member W. D. Jones was unsure whether he had ever seen her fire at officers.[3][4] Parker's reputation as a cigar-smoking gun moll grew out of a playful snapshot found by police at an abandoned hideout, released to the press, and published nationwide; while she did chain-smoke Camel cigarettes, she was not a cigar smoker.[5]

Author-historian Jeff Guinn explains that it was the release of these very photos that put the outlaws on the media map and launched their legend: "John Dillinger had matinee-idol good looks and Pretty Boy Floyd had the best possible nickname, but the Joplin photos introduced new criminal superstars with the most titillating trademark of all—illicit sex. Clyde Barrow and Bonnie Parker were wild and young, and supposedly slept together. Without Bonnie, the media outside Texas might have dismissed Clyde as a gun-toting punk, if it ever considered him at all. With her sassy photographs, Bonnie supplied the sex-appeal, the oomph, that allowed the two of them to transcend the small-scale thefts and needless killings that actually comprised their criminal careers."[6]

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