Creativity in the School Library
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All You Need is Less: The KonMari Test of Collection Strength

All You Need is Less: The KonMari Test of Collection Strength | Creativity in the School Library | Scoop.it

John Hubbard writes: "...saying that a library with more items is superior, solely by virtue of its size, is akin to arguing that Donald Trump is a better person than you because he has more money.


Mary Reilley Clark's insight:

As S.R. Ranganathan stated, every library is a growing organism. The strength of our collections may lie in contracting. Students that used to come to the library to find books on Supreme Court cases are now in a 1:1 class and  do all of their research online. These books haven't been checked out in four years. Likewise, books on science fairs, our state and country books and most of our technology section will be weeded this summer. Our reference section is gone, either weeded or intershelved with non-fiction. 


Instead of  replacing those books, I'll be instructing students on how to use public library databases and curated web-based resources. We'll repurpose all that open space as a more functional and flexible presentation area. Where am I spending my book money? On fiction, graphic novels, narrative non-fiction--books that our students want to read. While our collection statistics may drop, our circulation numbers have climbed. (Not that I judge solely by that criterion, either!) 

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Aimee Joyaux's curator insight, March 1, 12:38 PM

As S.R. Ranganathan stated, every library is a growing organism. The strength of our collections may lie in contracting. Students that used to come to the library to find books on Supreme Court cases are now in a 1:1 class and  do all of their research online. These books haven't been checked out in four years. Likewise, books on science fairs, our state and country books and most of our technology section will be weeded this summer. Our reference section is gone, either weeded or intershelved with non-fiction. 


Instead of  replacing those books, I'll be instructing students on how to use public library databases and curated web-based resources. We'll repurpose all that open space as a more functional and flexible presentation area. Where am I spending my book money? On fiction, graphic novels, narrative non-fiction--books that our students want to read. While our collection statistics may drop, our circulation numbers have climbed. (Not that I judge solely by that criterion, either!) 

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Katie Darty: Sprucing Up My School Library for Less Than $600

Katie Darty: Sprucing Up My School Library for Less Than $600 | Creativity in the School Library | Scoop.it
Taking inspiration from the thrifty library design hashtag #macgyverlibrarianship, a high school librarian freshened up her space on a tight budget. Check out what she did and how much she spent.
Mary Reilley Clark's insight:

I am so impressed! Our library furniture is still in great shape, but I'd love to paint the tabletops with whiteboard paint. Follow Katie at @nbhslibrary!

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Kathy Moser's curator insight, March 9, 2:30 PM

I am so impressed! Our library furniture is still in great shape, but I'd love to paint the tabletops with whiteboard paint. Follow Katie at @nbhslibrary!

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Teaching With YouTube: 197 Digital Channels For Learning

Teaching With YouTube: 197 Digital Channels For Learning | Creativity in the School Library | Scoop.it


If you don’t have a YouTube channel as an education provider, there’s a good chance you’re behind the times. Nearly every major educational institution in the world now hosts its own collection of videos featuring news, lectures, tutorials, and open courseware. Just as many individuals have their own channel, curating their expertise in a series of broadcasted lessons.

Mary Reilley Clark's insight:

So much great stuff to share with teachers!

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Buchtel CLC 7&8's curator insight, March 7, 1:57 PM

So much great stuff to share with teachers!

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Six Things That Made My Patrick Ness Author Visit a Knockout Success

Six Things That Made My Patrick Ness Author Visit a Knockout Success | Creativity in the School Library | Scoop.it

Lauren McBride writes: "In November, I had the remarkable opportunity to host the Carnegie-award winning author Patrick Ness at Riverside High School in Leesburg, VA, where I am a librarian. Ness is the author of several award-winning YA books including “The Chaos Walking Trilogy,” A Monster Calls, More Than This, (all Candlewick, 2008-2010; 2013, 2014) and his newest book, The Rest of Us Just Live Here (HarperTeen, 2015). The visit was an astounding success and had a big impact on our students and staff.

Several critical steps helped this author visit succeed. Here are some tips to get the most out of yours."

Mary Reilley Clark's insight:

Lauren shares several great ideas to pull off a successful author visit!

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The Adventures of Library Girl: Six Tips for Building Book Displays That Matter

The Adventures of Library Girl: Six Tips for Building Book Displays That Matter | Creativity in the School Library | Scoop.it

Jennifer LaGarde writes: "Sure... book displays wrapped in caution tape during Banned Books Week are good fun and raise awareness of an important topic, but I just don't think that's good enough.  Too often we view our displays as a way tocommunicate an idea, when really we should think of them as a chance to connect with kids.  Every display presents us with an opportunity to tackle big things: to address individual student needs, to awaken dormant readers, and to engage all kids in meaningful conversations about books, reading and their lives as learners.  What's more, it is my strong belief that every display we build sends a message (not just to our students, but to everyone who walks through the door) about what we value and the purpose of our work with students.  Why would we waste that valuable real estate on displays that don't tell the real story of how librarians make a difference for kids?"

Sure... book displays wrapped in caution tape during Banned Books Week are good fun and raise awareness of an important topic, but I just don't think that's good enough.  Too often we view our displays as a way tocommunicate an idea, when really we should think of them as a chance to connect with kids.  Every display presents us with an opportunity to tackle big things: to address individual student needs, to awaken dormant readers, and to engage all kids in meaningful conversations about books, reading and their lives as learners.  What's more, it is my strong belief that every display we build sends a message (not just to our students, but to everyone who walks through the door) about what we value and the purpose of our work with students.  Why would we waste that valuable real estate on displays that don't tell the real story of how librarians make a difference for kids?

Mary Reilley Clark's insight:

There's a LOT to ponder--and act on--here. Be sure to click the links to see more on Dr. Sandra Hughes-Hassell's thoughts about displays, and think about your school population. What story is your library telling through your book displays? 

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Twelve Days of Tech-mas 2015 Edition

Twelve Days of Tech-mas 2015 Edition | Creativity in the School Library | Scoop.it

Naomi Bates has created a gift for all of us--a fun presentation about new tech tools she's using. 

Mary Reilley Clark's insight:

Check these out, then share with staff!

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Digital Citizenship 2015

Digital Citizenship 2015 | Creativity in the School Library | Scoop.it

Another quick overview presentation for 6th grade students.

Mary Reilley Clark's insight:

Feel free to use and share. Please credit Craig Badura for the original idea!

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Mission Possible-7th Grade Orientation

Mission Possible-7th Grade Orientation | Creativity in the School Library | Scoop.it

I used a PowToon template to make a short introduction for my 7th grade orientation. Since most of them are returning students, I wanted to make it fast, and I didn't want to talk as much. I print out numbered instructions, with plenty of roles for students who don't volunteer for the big jobs, or who are new to the school. Here are my instructions.  


I will show this short video, hand out the instructions, then use this Bruno Mars parody, as the video in the instructions, since they didn't see it as 6th graders. 

Mary Reilley Clark's insight:

Feel free to use, share or modify!

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Marcia Kochel's curator insight, September 8, 2015 9:38 AM

Fun idea for an active library orientation. This could be fun for the Freedom to Read elective to make something like this for 5th graders to do.

Sandra Carswell's curator insight, September 8, 2015 11:16 AM

Thank you Mary Clark!

lfredric's curator insight, March 9, 4:39 PM

Feel free to use, share or modify!

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Wonderful Parody Video for Library Orientation!

Unread Book is presented by Pogona Creative and the Orange Public Library in association with Chapman University and was originally prepared for National Lib...
Mary Reilley Clark's insight:

Only 4 days until our first class of 6th graders come to the library. I am starting my orientation with this video! Even with SIXTY-ONE sections of language arts classes, I think I'll still enjoy it.

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Carlos Silva's curator insight, August 29, 2015 11:01 PM

añada su visión ...

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Six Back-to-School Goals for Teacher Librarians | Tech Tidbits

Six Back-to-School Goals for Teacher Librarians | Tech Tidbits | Creativity in the School Library | Scoop.it
Librarians can jump-start the school year by setting some essential goals. Here, teacher librarian Phil Goerner tackles his top six objectives and lays out a plan for achieving these goals, which range from creating new maker space projects to engaging teachers in professional development.
Mary Reilley Clark's insight:

I had 5 of the 6 goals Phil mentions already on my list. At middle school, I'm leery of focusing on banned books, but  the idea of fREADom has given me something to ponder.

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The Art of Weeding | Collection Management

The Art of Weeding | Collection Management | Creativity in the School Library | Scoop.it

Ian Chant writes: "There’s an uncomfortable truth about library stacks that most librarians know but many don’t like to admit: those shelves hold a lot of junk that has to make way for the new titles getting published every day."

Mary Reilley Clark's insight:

I love the idea of "selecting for the book sale"! Also, great ideas on repurposing weeded books. We've used them in our December craft days for black-out poems, Christmas trees, etc., but the planters and picture frames are new to me. 


Weeding gradually through the year has always been my policy, since I don't have a big chunk of time to devote to weeding. I'm always glad to see my instincts backed up by librarians!

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Tabitha Voorhees's curator insight, October 20, 2015 7:07 PM

For those of us doing Reference Skills 2, this relates to it. :)

Margaret LibStudies's curator insight, October 22, 2015 12:24 AM

Such a hard thing to do, but very necessary.

Shazzy LibStudies's curator insight, October 27, 2015 6:39 PM

Thanks Tabitha, as you have said, relevant for Ref 2 studies

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Library Commons-a Peek at the Future

Library Commons-a Peek at the Future | Creativity in the School Library | Scoop.it

Claudette Riley writes: "

One look around the wide open room on the south side of Carver Middle School, which overlooks walking trails, and it becomes clear: This is not your father's school library.

It is, however, a peek at what's to come.

At Carver, the library is called a "learning commons." There are brightly colored walls (purple signifies collaborative space); small group work space with trendy furniture; tables with rocking chairs; rows of desktop computers; and a nook filled with games that is in the process of being transformed into a "maker" or creative play space."

Mary Reilley Clark's insight:

I love the quote toward the end of this article from school board member Annie Busch, a former public library administrator: '"Libraries are not just a little place with walls around it, where you are coming in and getting a book," Busch said. "We need to change our mindsets about what happens in a library." ' It's wonderful to see a school district that really gets libraries!

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Mary Reilley Clark's curator insight, May 26, 2015 11:49 AM

I love the quote toward the end of this article from school board member Annie Busch, a former public library administrator: '"Libraries are not just a little place with walls around it, where you are coming in and getting a book," Busch said. "We need to change our mindsets about what happens in a library." ' It's wonderful to see a school district that really gets libraries!

Sharlene Lien's curator insight, July 23, 2015 6:58 PM

Changing the mindset

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5 Tools for Movie Making in Your MakerSpace

5 Tools for Movie Making in Your MakerSpace | Creativity in the School Library | Scoop.it

Karen Jensen writes: "One of the things my teens like to do best in my MakerSpace is to make mini movies, so I’ve been working on upping our game and finding new tools to learn new skills. Below are 5 of the various resources, apps and tools I recommend for making a variety of types of short films with tweens and teens in a MakerSpace."

Mary Reilley Clark's insight:

This is something I need to focus on this summer! I spent a frustrating weekend playing with iMovie and WeVideo, and couldn't get either to work the way I wanted. I'm making my own 23 Things for summer, so I can help students with movies next  year.

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Sharlene Lien's curator insight, July 23, 2015 6:59 PM

Resource for PSA announcement lesson

mariana swifties's curator insight, August 2, 2015 12:30 PM

This is something I need to focus on this summer! I spent a frustrating weekend playing with iMovie and WeVideo, and couldn't get either to work the way I wanted. I'm making my own 23 Things for summer, so I can help students with movies next  year.

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6 Active Learning Spaces Your Library Should Have | Knowledge Quest

6 Active Learning Spaces Your Library Should Have | Knowledge Quest | Creativity in the School Library | Scoop.it

Diana Rendina writes: "In the book Get Active: Reimagining Learning Spaces for Student Success, the authors identify six types of active learning spaces that are essential for creating an engaging learning environment for students. While this research (and this book) are not specifically focused on school libraries, we are the ideal place in our schools to encompass all six types of learning spaces in one location. We are the learning hubs of our schools after all. :)"



Mary Reilley Clark's insight:

We're busy constructing our timeline to do some low-cost library remodeling/reconfiguring this summer. We're hoping to relocate our large group presentation space to a darker area of the library so everyone can SEE what's on the screen! That will give us room for collaborative and small group workspace. Of course, extensive weeding is the first step so we can free up some floor space!

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Kathy Moser's curator insight, March 9, 2:31 PM

We're busy constructing our timeline to do some low-cost library remodeling/reconfiguring this summer. We're hoping to relocate our large group presentation space to a darker area of the library so everyone can SEE what's on the screen! That will give us room for collaborative and small group workspace. Of course, extensive weeding is the first step so we can free up some floor space!

Margareta's curator insight, April 1, 9:58 AM

We're busy constructing our timeline to do some low-cost library remodeling/reconfiguring this summer. We're hoping to relocate our large group presentation space to a darker area of the library so everyone can SEE what's on the screen! That will give us room for collaborative and small group workspace. Of course, extensive weeding is the first step so we can free up some floor space!

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Color Our Collections - Coloring Pages from Museums and Libraries

Color Our Collections - Coloring Pages from Museums and Libraries | Creativity in the School Library | Scoop.it

Museums and libraries from around the world are participating in #colorourcollections week from Feb 1-5, 2016. Search both #colorourcollections and #colourourcollections for the best results.  If you're on Twitter, check the full list here: 

https://twitter.com/NYAMHistory/lists/colorourcollections/members

Mary Reilley Clark's insight:

 So much great cross-curricular stuff here! Our 7th graders canuse these for medieval history and life science. Have fun exploring!

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 Lessons Learned About Kiddle

 Lessons Learned About Kiddle | Creativity in the School Library | Scoop.it

Kiddle - a visual search engine for kids, powered by editors and Google safe search. Not a Google product!

Mary Reilley Clark's insight:

A final (3/4/2016) update on Kiddle:

 

So, I posted about this great search engine on LM_NET. Gary Price of InfoDocket then pointed out that NO search engine is completely safe, and that promoting Kiddle may give teachers, parents and students  a false sense of security. Kiddle also had a judgmental snark to it: when students searched "penis", the response was something like "Oops, looks like a bad word."  The folks behind Kiddle are very responsive--today when I looked up that "bad word", I was told instead "Oops, try again." A few weeks ago, you were out of luck if you wanted information about breast cancer from Kiddle. (Another "bad word.")  Now, if you type in "breast", you'll get links to Butterball turkey, KidsHealth.org's article about breasts and bras, and lots of information about breast cancer. So, Kiddle is trying. Not perfect by any means, but trying. Perhaps worth keeping in your pocket when World Book is too elementary, but your students struggle with the reading level in a database. (My middle school SAI students hate the portal for World Book)

 

But here's where things got weird. Last week, I saw several people tweet and post about Kiddle as "Google's new kid-friendly search engine." It was amazing how fast that incorrect tweet spread. Most librarians I know who shared it later corrected their blogs or tweets, but a lot of folks didn't. (A quick look at the URL should give you a clear indication Kiddle is not part of the Google family.)

 

So, bottom line: 1. Kiddle isn't perfect. 2. No search engine is. 3. The people behind it, anonymous though they may be, seem to have good intentions, and are constantly working to improve the site based on feedback. 4. WE can do a better job helping students think about searching and directing them to more targeted sites, rather than general search engines (Thanks for that reminder, Gary Price!) 5. We all need to be careful about sharing and retweeting without verifying. And 6. That Butterball turkey link made me realize dinner isn't going to cook itself.

 

                ******************************************

Original post:

 

I used Kiddle today with a specialized academic instruction class. The large thumbnails with plenty of white space made it easier for students to decide which sites they would look at first. Kiddle developers rank websites as follows:

 

  • The first 1-3 sites will be written specifically for children and are chosen by Kiddle editors
  • The following sites (usually 5-7) will be safe sites with content not specifically written for children, but at a reading level they can understand. These are also chosen by Kiddle editors
  • The remaining sites are filtered by Google Safe Search, not geared to children, and possibly harder to understand.
 
Kiddle would be great for elementary students. The filters are very strict--search for information on breast cancer, and you'll be told you're searching for "bad words." Still, I think the visual aspect of the search would appeal to many students, so I'll continue to use it with our SAI classes.
 
*** Update ****
 
I wanted to share some feedback I received from Gary Price of InfoDocket. 
  • when words are misspelled, safety filters are for naught, i.e., "beheaddings" (although the images that make it through the filters when it's spelled correctly are pretty graphic, too.)
  • the filters can block appropriate searches, such as "breast cancer" or "adult education". 
 
So, as with any other search engine or website, we need to teach students about safe searches and critical thinking!
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Brenda Rogers's curator insight, March 6, 4:11 PM

I used Kiddle today with a specialized academic instruction class. The large thumbnails with plenty of white space made it easier for students to decide which sites they would look at first. Kiddle developers rank websites as follows:


The first 1-3 sites will be written specifically for children and are chosen by Kiddle editorsThe following sites (usually 5-7) will be safe sites with content not specifically written for children, but at a reading level they can understand. These are also chosen by Kiddle editorsThe remaining sites are filtered by Google Safe Search, not geared to children, and possibly harder to understand.
Kiddle would be great for elementary students. The filters are very strict--search for information on breast cancer, and you'll be told you're searching for "bad words." Still, I think the visual aspect of the search would appeal to many students, so I'll continue to use it with our SAI classes.
***Update****
I wanted to share some feedback I received from Gary Price of InfoDocket. 
when words are misspelled, safety filters are for naught, i.e., "beheaddings" (although the images that make it through the filters when it's spelled correctly are pretty graphic, too.)the filters can block appropriate searches, such as "breast cancer" or "adult education". 

So, as with any other search engine or website, we need to teach students about safe searches and critical thinking!
Susanne Sharkey's curator insight, March 7, 7:39 AM

A final (3/4/2016) update on Kiddle:

 

So, I posted about this great search engine on LM_NET. Gary Price of InfoDocket then pointed out that NO search engine is completely safe, and that promoting Kiddle may give teachers, parents and students  a false sense of security. Kiddle also had a judgmental snark to it: when students searched "penis", the response was something like "Oops, looks like a bad word."  The folks behind Kiddle are very responsive--today when I looked up that "bad word", I was told instead "Oops, try again." A few weeks ago, you were out of luck if you wanted information about breast cancer from Kiddle. (Another "bad word.")  Now, if you type in "breast", you'll get links to Butterball turkey, KidsHealth.org's article about breasts and bras, and lots of information about breast cancer. So, Kiddle is trying. Not perfect by any means, but trying. Perhaps worth keeping in your pocket when World Book is too elementary, but your students struggle with the reading level in a database. (My middle school SAI students hate the portal for World Book)

 

But here's where things got weird. Last week, I saw several people tweet and post about Kiddle as "Google's new kid-friendly search engine." It was amazing how fast that incorrect tweet spread. Most librarians I know who shared it later corrected their blogs or tweets, but a lot of folks didn't. (A quick look at the URL should give you a clear indication Kiddle is not part of the Google family.)

 

So, bottom line: 1. Kiddle isn't perfect. 2. No search engine is. 3. The people behind it, anonymous though they may be, seem to have good intentions, and are constantly working to improve the site based on feedback. 4. WE can do a better job helping students think about searching and directing them to more targeted sites, rather than general search engines (Thanks for that reminder, Gary Price!) 5. We all need to be careful about sharing and retweeting without verifying. And 6. That Butterball turkey link made me realize dinner isn't going to cook itself.

 

                ******************************************

Original post:

 

I used Kiddle today with a specialized academic instruction class. The large thumbnails with plenty of white space made it easier for students to decide which sites they would look at first. Kiddle developers rank websites as follows:

 

The first 1-3 sites will be written specifically for children and are chosen by Kiddle editorsThe following sites (usually 5-7) will be safe sites with content not specifically written for children, but at a reading level they can understand. These are also chosen by Kiddle editorsThe remaining sites are filtered by Google Safe Search, not geared to children, and possibly harder to understand.
 
Kiddle would be great for elementary students. The filters are very strict--search for information on breast cancer, and you'll be told you're searching for "bad words." Still, I think the visual aspect of the search would appeal to many students, so I'll continue to use it with our SAI classes.
 
*** Update ****
 
I wanted to share some feedback I received from Gary Price of InfoDocket. 
when words are misspelled, safety filters are for naught, i.e., "beheaddings" (although the images that make it through the filters when it's spelled correctly are pretty graphic, too.)the filters can block appropriate searches, such as "breast cancer" or "adult education". 
 
So, as with any other search engine or website, we need to teach students about safe searches and critical thinking!
lfredric's curator insight, March 9, 4:38 PM

A final (3/4/2016) update on Kiddle:

 

So, I posted about this great search engine on LM_NET. Gary Price of InfoDocket then pointed out that NO search engine is completely safe, and that promoting Kiddle may give teachers, parents and students  a false sense of security. Kiddle also had a judgmental snark to it: when students searched "penis", the response was something like "Oops, looks like a bad word."  The folks behind Kiddle are very responsive--today when I looked up that "bad word", I was told instead "Oops, try again." A few weeks ago, you were out of luck if you wanted information about breast cancer from Kiddle. (Another "bad word.")  Now, if you type in "breast", you'll get links to Butterball turkey, KidsHealth.org's article about breasts and bras, and lots of information about breast cancer. So, Kiddle is trying. Not perfect by any means, but trying. Perhaps worth keeping in your pocket when World Book is too elementary, but your students struggle with the reading level in a database. (My middle school SAI students hate the portal for World Book)

 

But here's where things got weird. Last week, I saw several people tweet and post about Kiddle as "Google's new kid-friendly search engine." It was amazing how fast that incorrect tweet spread. Most librarians I know who shared it later corrected their blogs or tweets, but a lot of folks didn't. (A quick look at the URL should give you a clear indication Kiddle is not part of the Google family.)

 

So, bottom line: 1. Kiddle isn't perfect. 2. No search engine is. 3. The people behind it, anonymous though they may be, seem to have good intentions, and are constantly working to improve the site based on feedback. 4. WE can do a better job helping students think about searching and directing them to more targeted sites, rather than general search engines (Thanks for that reminder, Gary Price!) 5. We all need to be careful about sharing and retweeting without verifying. And 6. That Butterball turkey link made me realize dinner isn't going to cook itself.

 

                ******************************************

Original post:

 

I used Kiddle today with a specialized academic instruction class. The large thumbnails with plenty of white space made it easier for students to decide which sites they would look at first. Kiddle developers rank websites as follows:

 

The first 1-3 sites will be written specifically for children and are chosen by Kiddle editorsThe following sites (usually 5-7) will be safe sites with content not specifically written for children, but at a reading level they can understand. These are also chosen by Kiddle editorsThe remaining sites are filtered by Google Safe Search, not geared to children, and possibly harder to understand.
 
Kiddle would be great for elementary students. The filters are very strict--search for information on breast cancer, and you'll be told you're searching for "bad words." Still, I think the visual aspect of the search would appeal to many students, so I'll continue to use it with our SAI classes.
 
*** Update ****
 
I wanted to share some feedback I received from Gary Price of InfoDocket. 
when words are misspelled, safety filters are for naught, i.e., "beheaddings" (although the images that make it through the filters when it's spelled correctly are pretty graphic, too.)the filters can block appropriate searches, such as "breast cancer" or "adult education". 
 
So, as with any other search engine or website, we need to teach students about safe searches and critical thinking!
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YA Books and More: Ten Ways Teacher Librarians Are Being Watched...and what you should do about it!

YA Books and More: Ten Ways Teacher Librarians Are Being Watched...and what you should do about it! | Creativity in the School Library | Scoop.it

Naomi Bates writes: "The big question school librarians need to ask themselves is, "What am I doing to drive students and teachers toward the library?"  


  

Mary Reilley Clark's insight:

What a great blog post! I am using it as a rubric to check what I'm doing the rest of this school year. 

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Tales from a Loud Librarian: December Holiday Decorating in a Public School

Tales from a Loud Librarian: December Holiday Decorating in a Public School | Creativity in the School Library | Scoop.it

Elizabeth Kahn writes: "...I like the idea of having some sort of decoration to mark the season since everyone celebrates the new year. A friend of mine brings a small artificial tree into her high school library. She provides various colors of chenille stems. She asks the students to decorate the tree with peace or love symbols. Okay, that would be a way to make the holiday season inclusive. For a couple of years, I have wanted to do something similar, but I didn't want to buy a tree, nor did I really have space for it in my library.  

Still, I like the idea of having some sort of decoration to mark the season since everyone celebrates the new year. A friend of mine brings a small artificial tree into her high school library. She provides various colors of chenille stems. She asks the students to decorate the tree with peace or love symbols. Okay, that would be a way to make the holiday season inclusive. For a couple of years, I have wanted to do something similar, but I didn't want to buy a tree, nor did I really have space for it in my library.  

Mary Reilley Clark's insight:

What a great idea! We can do this next year on the new wall that will be built during our winter break.

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WWP Library's curator insight, March 7, 4:19 PM

What a great idea! We can do this next year on the new wall that will be built during our winter break.

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Are You Committing Readicide?

Are You Committing Readicide? | Creativity in the School Library | Scoop.it

Nancy Barile writes: "As teachers, we are under constant, enormous pressure to help our students succeed. But we also have to be cautious that we don’t destroy their love of learning along the way. Instead, let’s work to create an atmosphere where teachers inspire and nurture students’ passion and enthusiasm for reading. If we build this foundation, success will soon follow." 

As teachers, we are under constant, enormous pressure to help our students succeed. But we also have to be cautious that we don’t destroy their love of learning along the way. Instead, let’s work to create an atmosphere where teachers inspire and nurture students’ passion and enthusiasm for reading. If we build this foundation, success will soon follow.

Mary Reilley Clark's insight:

What a great article to share with teachers! I understand the pressure of the Common Core Standards, but free choice reading is important at every grade level.

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Turn Textbooks into Art & Get Creative With Upcycling

Turn Textbooks into Art & Get Creative With Upcycling | Creativity in the School Library | Scoop.it
Strictly defined, upcycling is what you’re doing when you take an old item that was intended for one purpose and turn it into something new.
Mary Reilley Clark's insight:

Great ideas and links here. We have  old textbooks with zero resale value. I'll be adding a few to the makerspace with some of these ideas.

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Tabitha Voorhees's curator insight, October 20, 2015 7:06 PM

Oh this is awesome. I would love to do this. 

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6th Grade Orientation--Meme Style!

6th Grade Orientation--Meme Style! | Creativity in the School Library | Scoop.it

I'm going more visual with 6th grade orientation this year. I thought I'd use all memes. I do whatever it takes to grab their attention! I'll show the Bruno Mars parody video first, go through this slideshow, give a quick tour of the library, and hopefully give them 15 minutes to check out!


7th graders do orientation themselves. I give them little slips of paper with a specific instruction: "After Mrs. Clark shows a video, run to the computers, spin around and say, 'HERE is where you can look up books!'" It gets them up and active, and it rests my voice after a week of 6th grade orientation:)

Mary Reilley Clark's insight:

Feel free to use or share!

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Focused curation - an indispensable role for the school librarian

Focused curation - an indispensable role for the school librarian | Creativity in the School Library | Scoop.it

Doug Johnson writes: "While the modern school librarian has happily adopted the role of "digital curator" of print and digital resources organized as pathfinders, webpages, GoogleDocs, or Pinterest, the learning management system can provide genuine curricular focus to digital resource curation."

Mary Reilley Clark's insight:

It's the last weekend before school starts, but it's so hot out, I've been digging through all the articles I've saved over the last month instead of enjoying the beach. As usual, Doug Johnson makes me think about how I can best help teachers. I curate a lot of content, but we don't have a school-wide LMS. Some teachers use Moodle, others have tried Schoology, and I keep my resources scattered over several curation sites, including Diigo, Scoop.it and Pinterest. Maybe with a new principal, it's time for a push to a single LMS. It certainly would allow me to share resources in a more consistent way!

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8 Creative Uses of Google Drawings You Shouldn’t Ignore

8 Creative Uses of Google Drawings You Shouldn’t Ignore | Creativity in the School Library | Scoop.it

"Did you ever click the bright red "New" button inside your Google Drive?


"Google Drawings isn't at the forefront of tools. The limelight is reserved for Docs, Sheets, and Slides. But let's do a reawakening of sorts and click on More to go to the "neglected" siblings. We have seen the usefulness of Google Forms. It's time to appreciate the versatility of Google Drawings.


"Google Drawings is the freshest among all Google Drive tools. It is not a full-blownimage editor like MS Paint. But the graphic editor is more powerful for one simple fact – it is a real-time collaborative application."


Jim Lerman's insight:


EXCELLENT suggestions and tips for how to use Google Drawings. Well worth the time to investigate.


Via Jim Lerman
Mary Reilley Clark's insight:

I just made some flyers and handouts for the library using Google Drawings. Thanks to Jim for sharing this article.

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Dr. Barbara Sweet's curator insight, August 3, 2015 8:04 PM

I look forward to exploring this!!

Tim Haag's curator insight, August 3, 2015 9:24 PM

I look forward to exploring this!!

WWP Library's curator insight, March 7, 4:31 PM

I just made some flyers and handouts for the library using Google Drawings. Thanks to Jim for sharing this article.

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Makerspaces in the Media Center

Makerspaces in the Media Center | Creativity in the School Library | Scoop.it

Karen Van Vliet writes: "A makerspace should be a dynamic space that allows for self expression, exploration, discovery, creativity, inquiry, critical thinking, and problem solving."

Mary Reilley Clark's insight:

A nice overview to share with administration if they need some convincing. Our makerspace has come together quickly, with a mix of donated and new materials, thanks to a Donors Choose grant. We were able to weed enough books to clear a double-sided bookcase for all the makerspace supplies. We also mounted the bookcase on wheels, so albeit a bit unwieldy, it can be moved if needed.

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The Adventures of Library Girl: An Open Letter To Principals (Before You Hire A New School Librarian)

The Adventures of Library Girl: An Open Letter To Principals (Before You Hire A New School Librarian) | Creativity in the School Library | Scoop.it

Jennnifer Largarde writes: "

  1. Look for someone who loves children more than books.  Books are awesome. And your new librarians should love them. But they should love children more.  Look for passion when you talk to them about their job, but make sure that passion revolves around what makes being a school librarian the best job in the world: the opportunity to match kids with the first book to change their lives. "
Mary Reilley Clark's insight:

Jennifer gives awesome advice that should be shared with every administrator in your district! I am so thankful that she emphasizes finding the right person, not the right degree. If our district paid more for "real" librarians, I'd enroll in an MLIS program tomorrow. 


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Erin Ryan's curator insight, October 24, 2015 4:09 PM

Such an excellent point about hiring new people. Good people=good outcomes. It is so easy to get drawn into a candidate based on their skills and knowledge, but to hire someone who can truly related to kids and people of the school community, that is just so critical. Excellent people and communication skills are needed to work in any role in a school. I happen to know someone who walks around almost daily with a grimace on his face, never showing an excitement, complaining and really looking as if he doesn't want to be at work. What message does that communicate to other students and staff? It is really not one of open dialogue and problem solving.  As for librarians, I cannot imagine our school functioning without them.  The author makes an excellent point about need the right person but also need one who is qualified and loves children. I think we forget sometimes that our librarians serve all of our students. I love the idea of providing data to support the practices of the library.