Creativity & Decision-Making
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Creativity, Innovation, and Decision-Making
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Stop Trying to Solve Problems

Stop Trying to Solve Problems | Creativity & Decision-Making | Scoop.it

"Hack the brain to increase complex problem solving."

 

"New research by Neuroscientist David Creswell from Carnegie Mellon ... explore[s]  what happens in the brain when people tackle problems that are too big for their conscious mind to solve."

 

 "To put it plainly - people who were distracted did better on a complex problem-solving task than people who put in conscious effort. This isn’t so surprising –the problem-solving resources of the non-conscious are millions if not billions of times larger than that of the conscious. What’s surprising is how fast this effect kicked in – the third group were distracted for only a few minutes. This wasn’t the ‘sleep on it’ effect, or about quieting the mind. It was something more accessible to all of us every day, in many small ways."


Via Sandeep Gautam
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Why The Future of Neuroscience Will Be Emotionless

Why The Future of Neuroscience Will Be Emotionless | Creativity & Decision-Making | Scoop.it

Should you trust your gut? This article provides answers from neuroscience. One finding: "go with your gut if your energy is low."

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‘Explorers’ use uncertainty and specific area of brain | Brown University News and Events

‘Explorers’ use uncertainty and specific area of brain | Brown University News and Events | Creativity & Decision-Making | Scoop.it

Life shrouds most choices in mystery. Some people inch toward a comfortable enough spot and stick close to that rewarding status quo. Out to dinner, they order the usual. Others consider their options systematically or randomly. But many choose to grapple with the uncertainty head on.

 

“Explorers” order the special because they aren’t sure they’ll like it. It’s a strategy of maximizing rewards by discovering whether as yet unexplored options might yield better returns. In a new study, Brown University researchers show that such explorers use a specific part of their brain to calculate the relative uncertainty of their choices, while non-explorers do not.

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When Truisms Are True

When Truisms Are True | Creativity & Decision-Making | Scoop.it
Our research has shown that people are indeed more creative when physically thinking “outside the box.”...
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Do You Suffer From Decision Fatigue?

Do You Suffer From Decision Fatigue? | Creativity & Decision-Making | Scoop.it
The very act of making decisions depletes our ability to make them well. So how do we navigate a world of endless choice?

 

Decision fatigue helps explain why ordinarily sensible people get angry at colleagues and families, splurge on clothes, buy junk food at the supermarket and can’t resist the dealer’s offer to rustproof their new car. No matter how rational and high-minded you try to be, you can’t make decision after decision without paying a biological price.

 

The more choices you make throughout the day, the harder each one becomes for your brain, and eventually it looks for shortcuts, usually in either of two very different ways. One shortcut is to become reckless: to act impulsively... The other shortcut is the ultimate energy saver: do nothing. Instead of agonizing over decisions, avoid any choice.

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John Kay - Obliquity

John Kay - Obliquity | Creativity & Decision-Making | Scoop.it

"Strange as it may seem, overcoming geographic obstacles, winning decisive battles or meeting global business targets are the type of goals often best achieved when pursued indirectly. This is the idea of Obliquity. Oblique approaches are most effective in difficult terrain, or where outcomes depend on interactions with other people."

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Decision-Making Under Stress: The Brain Remembers Rewards, Forgets Punishments | Healthland | TIME.com

Decision-Making Under Stress: The Brain Remembers Rewards, Forgets Punishments | Healthland | TIME.com | Creativity & Decision-Making | Scoop.it
If you're trying to make an important decision while the baby is crying, the boss is shouting on the phone and the cat has chosen this moment to think outside the box, you might want to take a breather and wait.

 

It's counterintuitive, but under stress we tend to focus more on the rewards than on the risks of any decision.

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BPS Research Digest: Introducing "enclothed cognition" - how what we wear affects how we think

BPS Research Digest: Introducing "enclothed cognition" - how what we wear affects how we think | Creativity & Decision-Making | Scoop.it

Whether donning a suit for an interview or a sexy outfit for a date, it's obvious that most of us are well aware of the power of clothing to affect how other people perceive us. But what about the power of our clothes to affect our own thoughts?

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What's Wrong With the Teenage Mind?

What's Wrong With the Teenage Mind? | Creativity & Decision-Making | Scoop.it
Children today reach puberty earlier and adulthood later. The result: a lot of teenage weirdness. Alison Gopnik on how we might readjust adolescence.
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Sleep-Deprived Neurons May Shut Down, Even When You’re Awake

Sleep-Deprived Neurons May Shut Down, Even When You’re Awake | Creativity & Decision-Making | Scoop.it

When deprived of sleep, parts of the human brain may doze off, secretly snatching moments of slumber even as people seem to be awake. That could explain why our sleep-deprived selves are so cognitively challenged: We are, if not precisely half-asleep, partially asleep.

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