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Jeremy Rifkin – The Internet of things and the next industrial revolution - E & T Magazine

Jeremy Rifkin – The Internet of things and the next industrial revolution - E & T Magazine | Creativity | Scoop.it
One of todays most influential technology commentators and social theorists, Jeremy Rifkin thinks that the next Industrial Revolution will be driven by the Internet of Things and the emergence of the collaborative commons.
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The idea you can put a number against a child's ability is flawed and dangerous

The idea you can put a number against a child's ability is flawed and dangerous | Creativity | Scoop.it
Headteacher Alison Peacock believes labeling children by ability leaves some trapped by low expectations. That’s why her school doesn’t do it
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Clive Thompson on Why You Should Always Carry a Pencil

Clive Thompson on Why You Should Always Carry a Pencil | Creativity | Scoop.it
Clive Thompson discusses writing longhand versus typing in a keynote speech titled “How the Way You Write Changes the Way You Think.”
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Headfirst into My So-Called Life: Embracing Your Productivity Style to Work Simply

Headfirst into My So-Called Life: Embracing Your Productivity Style to Work Simply | Creativity | Scoop.it
“If you’re reading this article, your efforts to solve your busyness problem have probably not paid off. ... The truth is that the problem is not you. It is how you are trying to overcome your busyness that is the problem.”
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What I Wish I Knew About Creativity When I Was 20

What I Wish I Knew About Creativity When I Was 20 | Creativity | Scoop.it
A look at 17 bits of advice on creativity and the best ways to capture inspiration and creative ideas.
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What It Really Takes to Be an Artist: MacArthur Genius Teresita Fernández’s Magnificent Commencement Address

What It Really Takes to Be an Artist: MacArthur Genius Teresita Fernández’s Magnificent Commencement Address | Creativity | Scoop.it
"Being an artist is not just about what happens when you are in the studio. The way you live, the people you choose to love and the way you
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Ted Hughes on the Universal Inner Child, in a Moving Letter to His Son

Ted Hughes on the Universal Inner Child, in a Moving Letter to His Son | Creativity | Scoop.it
When I came to Lake Victoria, it was quite obvious to me that in some of the most important ways you are much more mature than I am. . . . But in many other ways obviously you are still childish — how could you not be, you alone among mankind? It’s something people don’t discuss, because it’s something most people are aware of only as a general crisis of sense of inadequacy, or helpless dependence, or pointless loneliness, or a sense of not having a strong enough ego to meet and master inner storms that come from an unexpected angle. But not many people realise that it is, in fact, the suffering of the child inside them. Everybody tries to protect this vulnerable two three four five six seven eight year old inside, and to acquire skills and aptitudes for dealing with the situations that threaten to overwhelm it. So everybody develops a whole armour of secondary self, the artificially constructed being that deals with the outer world, and the crush of circumstances. And when we meet people this is what we usually meet. And if this is the only part of them we meet we’re likely to get a rough time, and to end up making ‘no contact’. But when you develop a strong divining sense for the child behind that armour, and you make your dealings and negotiations only with that child, you find that everybody becomes, in a way, like your own child. It’s an intangible thing. But they too sense when that is what you are appealing to, and they respond with an impulse of real life, you get a little flash of the essential person, which is the child. Usually, that child is a wretchedly isolated undeveloped little being. It’s been protected by the efficient armour, it’s never participated in life, it’s never been exposed to living and to managing the person’s affairs, it’s never been given responsibility for taking the brunt. And it’s never properly lived. That’s how it is in almost everybody. And that little creature is sitting there, behind the armour, peering through the slits. And in its own self, it is still unprotected, incapable, inexperienced. Every single person is vulnerable to unexpected defeat in this inmost emotional self. At every moment, behind the most efficient seeming adult exterior, the whole world of the person’s childhood is being carefully held like a glass of water bulging above the brim. And in fact, that child is the only real thing in them. It’s their humanity, their real individuality, the one that can’t understand why it was born and that knows it will have to die, in no matter how crowded a place, quite on its own. That’s the carrier of all the living qualities. It’s the centre of all the possible magic and revelation. What doesn’t come out of that creature isn’t worth having, or it’s worth having only as a tool — for that creature to use and turn to account and make meaningful. So there it is. And the sense of itself, in that little being, at its core, is what it always was. But since that artificial secondary self took over the control of life around the age of eight, and relegated the real, vulnerable, supersensitive, suffering self back into its nursery, it has lacked training, this inner prisoner. And so, wherever life takes it by surprise, and suddenly the artificial self of adaptations proves inadequate, and fails to ward off the invasion of raw experience, that inner self is thrown into the front line — unprepared, with all its childhood terrors round its ears. And yet that’s the moment it wants. That’s where it comes alive — even if only to be overwhelmed and bewildered and hurt. And that’s where it calls up its own resources — not artificial aids, picked up outside, but real inner resources, real biological ability to cope, and to turn to account, and to enjoy. That’s the paradox: the only time most people feel alive is when they’re suffering, when something overwhelms their ordinary, careful armour, and the naked child is flung out onto the world. That’s why the things that are worst to undergo are best to remember. But when that child gets buried away under their adaptive and protective shells—he becomes one of the walking dead, a monster. So when you realise you’ve gone a few weeks and haven’t felt that awful struggle of your childish self — struggling to lift itself out of its inadequacy and incompetence — you’ll know you’ve gone some weeks without meeting new challenge, and without growing, and that you’ve gone some weeks towards losing touch with yourself. The only calibration that counts is how much heart people invest, how much they ignore their fears of being hurt or caught out or humiliated. And the only thing people regret is that they didn’t live boldly enough, that they didn’t invest enough heart, didn’t love enough. Nothing else really counts at all.
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#FocusOnReading No.7 – Hearing children read | Primary English Education

#FocusOnReading No.7 – Hearing children read | Primary English Education | Creativity | Scoop.it
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AC Podcast: What To Do When You Aren’t Inspired | Accidental Creative

AC Podcast: What To Do When You Aren’t Inspired | Accidental Creative | Creativity | Scoop.it
It's great when inspiration strikes and you're deeply motivated to do your work, but what about when you simply can't muster the will to do your important work?
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5 Creativity Myths You Probably Believe

5 Creativity Myths You Probably Believe | Creativity | Scoop.it
Creativity isn't the result of a high IQ or being right-brained. Before you get set to work on your next project, know what's actually holding you back and what's all in your head.
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Seth Godin: Keep Making a Ruckus

Seth Godin: Keep Making a Ruckus | Creativity | Scoop.it
The best selling author reminds us that it's free to be wrong, so why don't we take more risks?
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The Imaginary Audience and the Ingredients for Creativity

The Imaginary Audience and the Ingredients for Creativity | Creativity | Scoop.it
I’ve written nearly 500 songs. The lyrics for the first 400 or so are typed up and bound in a book. The original lyrics and chords are contain in dozens on hardback notebooks, usually written in mu...
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Write "Morning Pages" by Hand Every Day to Boost Productivity

Write "Morning Pages" by Hand Every Day to Boost Productivity | Creativity | Scoop.it
Author and journalist Julia Cameron claims the secret to a productive day is actually a simple practice. Every morning, take a pen and three blank pages and write down whatever you want to fill those pages.
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Why the modern world is bad for your brain

Why the modern world is bad for your brain | Creativity | Scoop.it
Multitasking is an essential skill in the era of email, text messages, Facebook and Twitter. But, argues neuroscientist Daniel J Levitin, it’s actually making us less efficient
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The Perils of Plans: Why Creativity Requires Leaping into the Unknown

The Perils of Plans: Why Creativity Requires Leaping into the Unknown | Creativity | Scoop.it
When writers who are just starting out ask me when it gets easier, my answer is never. It never gets easier. I don’t want to scare them, so I rarely say more than that, but the truth is that, if anything, it gets harder. The writing life isn’t just filled with predictable uncertainties but with the awareness that we are always starting over again. That everything we ever write will be flawed. We may have written one book, or many, but all we know — if we know anything at all — is how to write the book we’re writing. All novels are failures. Perfection itself would be a failure. All we can hope is that we will fail better. That we won’t succumb to fear of the unknown. That we will not fall prey to the easy enchantments of repeating what may have worked in the past. I try to remember that the job — as well as the plight, and the unexpected joy — of the artist is to embrace uncertainty, to be sharpened and honed by it. To be birthed by it. Each time we come to the end of a piece of work, we have failed as we have leapt — spectacularly, brazenly — into the unknown.
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"The business of the school is to make good human beings" through "Fixing the general character and direction of the school curriculum"

"The business of the school is to make good human beings" through "Fixing the general character and direction of the school curriculum" | Creativity | Scoop.it
"The business of the school is to make good human beings" "Fixing the general character and direction of the school curriculum" This is the 5th in our series of posts on the contribution of the Had...
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The Lost Art of Free Time

The Lost Art of Free Time | Creativity | Scoop.it
After finishing a big project, you’ll be tempted to ride the momentum to the next big thing. But first, take a breather.
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Why Does Criticism Sting? | Accidental Creative

Why Does Criticism Sting? | Accidental Creative | Creativity | Scoop.it
It’s often not the circumstances we learn from, but our response to them. Identifying limiting narratives or patterns of self-destruction can help us spot them
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What To Say To Non-Creative People | Awaken Creativity

What To Say To Non-Creative People | Awaken Creativity | Creativity | Scoop.it
What do you say to people who think they aren't creative? How do you talk to them? Here's a new way to think about creativity for yourself and others.
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Sir Ken Robinson - Educating the Heart and Mind

This RSA Animate was adapted from a talk given at the RSA by Sir Ken Robinson, world-renowned education and creativity expert and recipient of the RSA's Benj...
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Thinking out of the box... but how did we get in it?

Thinking out of the box... but how did we get in it? | Creativity | Scoop.it
Society has such an outmoded view of creativity. At best it’s a necessary evil, at worst it’s a waste of time. If you don’t believe me, go and have a look at your primary national curriculum for sc...
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The Psychological Benefits of Writing

The Psychological Benefits of Writing | Creativity | Scoop.it
The mental benefits of writing are numerous; here's the best research that details just how essential writing is for the intelligent mind.
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