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Are You Building Loyalty to the Reward or the Business?

Are You Building Loyalty to the Reward or the Business? | Creativity & Innovation - Interest Piques | Scoop.it
Competing on loyalty rewards is akin to competing on price; a business must be able to offer more rewards or rewards their target markets perceive as better to gain an edge.Competing on price begs
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What We’re Reading: Four Principles for Fueling a Culture of Innovation From ‘Creativity, Inc.’ | Talking Point | The Disney Institute Blog

What We’re Reading: Four Principles for Fueling a Culture of Innovation From ‘Creativity, Inc.’ | Talking Point | The Disney Institute Blog | Creativity & Innovation - Interest Piques | Scoop.it
Ed Catmull’s book, Creativity, Inc., offers excellent insight into how businesses can build a culture that thrives in creativity and innovation. Here are four principles that we found particularly helpful.
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5 Classic Books That Have Inspired Innovative Thinking Throughout Time

5 Classic Books That Have Inspired Innovative Thinking Throughout Time | Creativity & Innovation - Interest Piques | Scoop.it
"Innovation", "mindfulness", and "creativity" are terms we hear a lot these days, but where did they come from? These...
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TEDx Talk: The Science Of Improving Your Brain’s Creativity

TEDx Talk: The Science Of Improving Your Brain’s Creativity | Creativity & Innovation - Interest Piques | Scoop.it
We are all creative. This whole notion that some people are creative while others are not is in fact a complete myth. So, what exactly is creativity?
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Innovation: The Flip Side of Resilience - Forbes

Innovation: The Flip Side of Resilience - Forbes | Creativity & Innovation - Interest Piques | Scoop.it
Forbes
Innovation: The Flip Side of Resilience
Forbes
My interest in Woods's talk, however, centered on how his research on adaptive organizations aligned so well with my thoughts on business agility and innovation.
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What Really Fosters Innovation

What Really Fosters Innovation | Creativity & Innovation - Interest Piques | Scoop.it

For a look at what's needed to foster innovation at your company, check out the infographic below.


Via Alberto Acereda, Ph.D.
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FRANK FEATHER ~ Business Futurist's curator insight, September 22, 12:27 PM

Helpful infographic on innovation to focus on basic needs and drivers.


Shawn Nason, Director, Xavier Center for Innovation's curator insight, September 24, 10:00 PM

Great Infograph on fostering a culture of innovation.

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The future is in how fast you are at unlearning. - Innovation Excellence (blog)

The future is in how fast you are at unlearning. - Innovation Excellence (blog) | Creativity & Innovation - Interest Piques | Scoop.it

Through our education, from kindergarten to grad school, then through our professional lives, we have been shaped in the same mold, even though we hear here and there that we need to “think outside the box”, that box being only aimed to fit into a bigger box, like the Russian dolls. Conventionalism, risk aversion and complacency kill innovation and entrepreneurship.




Via jean lievens
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Stupid Questions? A Call for Asking Stupid Questions by Woody Bendle | The Brainzooming Group

Stupid Questions? A Call for Asking Stupid Questions by Woody Bendle | The Brainzooming Group | Creativity & Innovation - Interest Piques | Scoop.it
It's always great to have a guest blog from Woody Bendle. I ran into Woody last Friday night at the Kansas City Airport, and I'm not sure if that's what prompted it, but this fantastic post on the ...
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46 Ready To Tweet Quotes To Kickstart Your Creativity - Stacey Corrin

46 Ready To Tweet Quotes To Kickstart Your Creativity - Stacey Corrin | Creativity & Innovation - Interest Piques | Scoop.it
Creativity is a fickle thing. One minute you’re bursting with great ideas and the next your mind is like a scene from a western – tumbleweed and all!
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8 Mistakes in Making Mistakes | The Brainzooming Group

8 Mistakes in Making Mistakes | The Brainzooming Group | Creativity & Innovation - Interest Piques | Scoop.it
The past year seems to have yielded various waves of content celebrating making mistakes. Advancing the "failure at the heart of innovation" theme seems to have become a cause célèbre for the creat...
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Thirty ideas to promote creativity in learning

Thirty ideas to promote creativity in learning | Creativity & Innovation - Interest Piques | Scoop.it

©


Via Leona Ungerer
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13 Recommended Readings For Creative Leaders This Fall - Forbes

13 Recommended Readings For Creative Leaders This Fall - Forbes | Creativity & Innovation - Interest Piques | Scoop.it
Forbes 13 Recommended Readings For Creative Leaders This Fall Forbes Shaun Rein, The End of Copycat China: The Rise of Creativity, Innovation and Individualism in China (Wiley, October 20) A leading consultant and commentator on the Chinese society...
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7 Smart Habits of Great Innovators

These seven habits will help you draw connections no one else sees, and keep innovation part of your routine.
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Teaching Creativity

Teaching Creativity | Creativity & Innovation - Interest Piques | Scoop.it
By Knowledge@Wharton Creativity may need the right conditions in order to flourish in an organization, but can it actually be taught?

Via Charles Tiayon
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Charles Tiayon's curator insight, September 10, 2:18 PM

The usual image of how creativity happens: A composer inadvertently hears a melody rising from a babbling brook, or an ad agency creative director crumples page after page of aborted ideas ripped from the typewriter until the right one lands. But creativity, some claim, can come from a far less elusive muse -- from a structured process, one that opens up the ranks of the creative to a wider swath than the Steve Jobs, Jonas Salks and Franz Schuberts of the universe.

"I think there are individual differences in our propensity to be creative," says Wharton marketing professor Rom Schrift, "but having said that, it’s like a muscle. If you train yourself, and there are different methods for doing this, you can become more creative. There are individual differences in people, but I would argue that it is also something that can be developed, and therefore, taught."

Wharton marketing professor Jerry (Yoram) Wind has in fact taught a course in creativity at Wharton for years, and says that "in any population, basically the distribution of creativity follows the normal curve. At the absolute extreme you have Einstein and Picasso, and you don’t have to teach them -- they are the geniuses. Nearly everyone else in the distribution, and the type of people you would deal with at leading universities and companies, can learn creativity."

Does creativity need the right conditions to flourish? Jennifer Mueller, a management professor at the University of San Diego and former Wharton professor who has researched creativity, sees evidence that it does. "Every theorist that exists today on the planet will tell you creativity is an ability that ranges in the population, and I think in a given context, creativity can be shut off -- or turned on, if the environment supports creativity."

John Maeda, former president of Rhode Island School of Design, believes creativity can be taught -- though he qualifies that belief. "I wouldn’t say it can be taught in the normal sense of adding knowledge and wisdom to someone. I would say instead it can be re-kindled in people -- all children are creative.

They just lose their capability to be creative by growing up," notes Maeda, now a partner at Kleiner Perkins Caufield & Byers and chair of eBay’s design advisory board. Creativity in a child, he adds, "is the ability to diverge. In a productive adult, it’s the ability to diverge and converge, with emphasis on the converging."

Anyone called upon to tap creativity has his or her own method, but photorealist painter and photographer Chuck Close suggests the matter is actually less mysterious than the muse-chasers might believe. "Inspiration," he has said, "is for amateurs -- the rest of us just show up and get to work."

Working with Boxes, Inside and Out

In whatever the sector or discipline -- product development, exploitation of networks, music or education -- creativity shares certain traits, experts say. Jacob Goldenberg, professor of marketing at the Arison School of Business at the IDC Herzliya in Israel, says creativity has more than 200 definitions in the literature. "However, if you ask people to grade ideas, the agreement is very high," he notes. "This means that even if it is difficult to define creativity, it is easy to identify it. One of the reasons why it is difficult to define is the fact that creativity exists in many different domains." Still, he says: "Most creative ideas share a common structure of being highly original and at the same time highly useful."

In Inside the Box: A Proven System of Creativity for Breakthrough Results, Goldenberg and co-author Drew Boyd make the case that all inventive solutions share certain common patterns. Working within parameters, rather than through free-associative brainstorming, leads to greater creativity, the book says. This method, called Systematic Inventive Thinking, has found application at Procter & Gamble and SAP, among others. "We shouldn’t confuse innovation and creativity," Goldenberg says. "Creativity refers to the idea, not to the system [product, service, process, etc.] that was built around it. For example, online banking is a great innovation, but the idea [of using the Internet to replace the branch] was not creative. It was expected years before it was implemented."

Similarly, he adds, "cell phone technology is one of the most innovative developments, but the need was defined years before, and we just waited for the technology. In my view, a creative idea that is still changing our lives is the concept of letting users develop the software they need on a platform [that a particular] firm sells: the apps concept. This means that consumers develop and determine the value of the smartphone and tablets."

This example, Goldenberg says, fits one of the templates for creativity described in Inside the Box: "Where you subtract one of the resources" -- such as engineers and marketers -- "and replace them with a resource that exists inside a closure (box), in this case your consumers."

Schrift has used a different template from Inside the Box in his classes: The idea of building a matrix of characteristics of two unrelated products, and creating new dependencies. Such examples, he says, include an air freshener that changes scent every 10 minutes (remixing the concepts of time and fragrance), or a gym with a fee that is structured to increase if you don’t work out enough (fitness and incentive). "A lot of the time, looking for a new dependency gives you a creative idea," Schrift notes.

Wind says that in whatever discipline, creativity is primarily "an ability to challenge the status quo and come up with new and better solutions. In art, the most creative figures are those who came up with new perspectives -- Brancusi, who broke away from Rodin; Picasso, who broke away from the Impressionists; Duchamp, who took readymades [ordinary manufactured objects, a porcelain urinal being the most infamous] and said, ‘this is art.’ Anyone who primarily breaks the current status quo and creates a new dimension -- the first person to think about understanding medicine in terms of a person’s DNA; in advertising it is [William] Bernbach, who came up with the slogan for Volkswagen, [or] Frank Gehry, who basically broke the tradition of the four-wall museum and came up with a dramatically different structure in Bilbao."

Making Space for the Tr

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Do I Need To be Creative?

Do I Need To be Creative? | Creativity & Innovation - Interest Piques | Scoop.it
The answer to this question is ‘No’. Refer to the Innovation Equation and you will soon understand why.
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Why We Hide Some of Our Best Work

Why We Hide Some of Our Best Work | Creativity & Innovation - Interest Piques | Scoop.it
Too much transparency can backfire. (- @HarvardBiz: Why do we hide our most creative thinking?
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Creativity – Does It Die From Structure? - Business 2 Community

Creativity – Does It Die From Structure? - Business 2 Community | Creativity & Innovation - Interest Piques | Scoop.it
Creativity – Does It Die From Structure?
Business 2 Community
Most people would agree that creativity is the mother of innovation.
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Why You Should Embrace Creativity Within Your Culture | Innovation Management

Why You Should Embrace Creativity Within Your Culture | Innovation Management | Creativity & Innovation - Interest Piques | Scoop.it
As a company grows, its creativity typically tends to decrease. What can be done to prevent a decrease in creativity within an organization?

Via Richard Andrews
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How Chico’s is creating a culture of innovation with Google for Work – Google+

How Chico’s is creating a culture of innovation with Google for Work – Google+ | Creativity & Innovation - Interest Piques | Scoop.it
Innovation and creativity are more important than ever, especially in the ultra-competitive retail industry.
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Amazon.fr - The Progress Principle: Using Small Wins to Ignite Joy, Engagement, and Creativity at Work - Teresa M. Amabile, Steven Kramer - Livres

Noté 4.5/5. Retrouvez The Progress Principle: Using Small Wins to Ignite Joy, Engagement, and Creativity at Work et des millions de livres en stock sur Amazon.fr.
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How Environment Can Boost Creativity

How Environment Can Boost Creativity | Creativity & Innovation - Interest Piques | Scoop.it
Dim lighting and ambient noise may lead to more out-of-the-box ideas.

Via Charles Tiayon
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Charles Tiayon's curator insight, September 21, 5:57 AM

It took F. Scott Fitzgerald nearly a decade to finish Tender is the Night, his semi-autobiographical novel about the physical, financial, and moral decline of a man with nearly limitless potential. While working on the novel, Fitzgerald and his wife, Zelda, moved between France, Switzerland, and the United States, eventually spending eighteen months at La Paix, an old country house north of Baltimore that he rented while Zelda was treated for schizophrenia at a nearby clinic. The Turnbull family owned the estate, and Andrew Turnbull, who was 11 at the time, later recounted Fitzgerald’s stay in his biography, Scott Fitzgerald.

While at La Paix, Fitzgerald worked in dark, disheveled rooms with a bottle of gin in a nearby drawer. He took short walks and came back to hand-write his ideas on notepads scattered on his desk. He also loved to sneak the Turnbulls’ homemade wine.

“Dazed and wan, he shuffled about the shut-in, unwholesome house in bathrobe and pajamas, pondering his next move,” Turnbull recalls in the book. “Returning to his study, he penciled [his thoughts] down in his rounded, decorous hand on yellow legal-sized paper. Interrupting him at work, I remember the illumination of his eye, the sensitive pull around the mouth, the wistful liquor-ridden thing about him.”

Part of the reason it took Fitzgerald so long to finish Tender is the Night was Zelda’s worsening condition. But you’d think that his haphazard, alcohol-fueled creative process wasn’t doing him any favors, either.

Yet recent research has shown that messy, dark, noisy, booze-filled environments like the one Fitzgerald cultivated at La Paix can, in fact, help stimulate creativity.

Darkness and dim lighting can encourage freedom of thought, which leads to a more prolific generation of ideas, according to arecent paper in the Journal of Environmental Psychology. Specifically, dim lighting downplays a room’s distractions, promoting focus on internal reflection and the work at hand.

The next question is whether to keep that work on a tidy or a messy desk. While a writer in a time crunch might prefer a clean desk (reducing clutter can help people focus), one small study found that working amid disorder helped people come up with more creative ideas.

Kathleen D. Vohs, a professor at the University of Minnesota Carlson School of Management and the lead researcher of the study, writes, “Being creative is aided by breaking away from tradition, order, and convention and a disorderly environment seems to help people do just that.”

Evidence also supports the habits of people who eschew a desk altogether, instead opting to work in a coffee shop. A little bit of ambient noise (between 50 and 70 decibels—the average noise level of a coffee shop) slightly disrupts the mental process, which one study showed to help people engage in more abstract thinking during a word-association task. A high level of noise, however, around 80 decibels—the sound of a dishwasher or garbage disposal, for instance—becomes so disruptive to information processing that it becomes hard to think at all.

Like a few notable modern creatives, such as Donna TarttQuentin Tarantino,George R.R. Martin, and Neil Gaiman, Fitzgerald also wrote by hand, only moving to his typewriter for final drafts. Though few people actually do it anymore, writing by hand can help with idea generationlearning, and memorization.

Other studies have shown that taking walks, or working in rooms with high ceilings, can promote divergent or abstract thinking.

Another tip: Get a little tipsy. Moderate intoxication—a blood alcohol content of about 0.075—improves problem solving and leads to what participants in theConsciousness and Cognition study referred to as “sudden insights,” which the sober participants reported significantly less often. That’s not a blanket license to get drunk on deadline, though. In a December 1934 letter to his Scribner editor, Maxwell Perkins, Fitzgerald wrote about the necessity to moderate his own drinking: “A short story can be written on a bottle, but for a novel you need the mental speed that enables you to keep the whole pattern in your head.”

Fitzgerald completed Tender is the Night while at La Paix in the autumn of 1933 just before his 37th birthday. By that time, he had seen his wife fall deeper into mental illness, his father passed away, and he suffered a tubercular hemorrhage that left him bedridden and unable to work for weeks. Having seen his own star slowly fade after reaching his pinnacle of fame so early on with This Side of Paradise when he was only 23, with Tender is the Night, he strove to regain the faith of the public and his faith in himself.

He used his own feelings of professional failure for the tragic character of Dick Diver; he used his disappointment with his parents for Dick and Nicole’s failed relationship; he used his affair with Lois Moran for Dick’s affair with Rosemary Hoyt; and he used the stinging reality of his wife’s illness and the memory of her affair with Edouard Jozan for Nicole’s illness and affair with Tommy Barban.

In a letter dated November 9, 1938, Fitzgerald wrote to Andrew Turnbull’s sister, Frances, who was a sophomore at Radcliffe College, and had sent him one of her first attempts at writing fiction.

“You've got to sell your heart, your strongest reactions, not the little minor things that only touch you lightly, the little experiences that you might tell at dinner,” wrote Fitzgerald.

This is what Fitzgerald believed was the key to a meaningful creative project. Perhaps all these little “life hacks”—the lighting, the noise levels, the alcohol—can help, but your environment can’t sell your heart for you. As Fitzgerald concluded his letter to Frances, “[Writing] is one of those professions that wants the ‘works.’ You wouldn't be interested in a soldier who was only a little brave.”

(Image via R.Ashrafov/Shutterstock.com)

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Enhance Your Creativity Through Analytics

Enhance Your Creativity Through Analytics | Creativity & Innovation - Interest Piques | Scoop.it
Think data analysis and creativity are mutually exclusive? Contributor Brian Massey explains how the two can and should work together.
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Out Of Left Field: How to Supercharge Your Creativity

Out Of Left Field: How to Supercharge Your Creativity | Creativity & Innovation - Interest Piques | Scoop.it
Sometimes the best way to get creative involves setting limits, deadlines and borders. Sounds counterintuitive, right? Not when EDM artist Kent Barton says it.
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10 Quotes On What Inspires Creativity, And What Most Definitely Does Not | Priscilla Frank | HuffPost.com

10 Quotes On What Inspires Creativity, And What Most Definitely Does Not | Priscilla Frank | HuffPost.com | Creativity & Innovation - Interest Piques | Scoop.it

Creativity is phenomenon that occurs when something new, be it an image, an idea, an invention, or some combination thereof, comes into being. Whether in the field of art, science, philosophy, writing, mathematics, physics, or whatever your discipline of choice may be, the stroke of creativity bears a similar sensation. Somewhere inside, doors open, lights turn on, distractions fade into oblivion. Yes, it is intense.


Over the years, many a brilliant mind has tried to pin down, in greater detail, what exactly creativity is and how best to go about finding it. Like the most nebulous and precious of concepts, it is often easiest described by what it is not. We've gathered a selection of our favorite tips from great minds throughout a variety of fields, all helping point us in the direction of finding that creative spark.


Some offer warnings, others advice; some in jest, and others very, very seriously. We hope some of the wise words will strike a chord within you, and serve you well in your quest to become the next Picasso or Plath.


Click headline to read more--


Via Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
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The Many Cultures of Innovation - Wired

The Many Cultures of Innovation - Wired | Creativity & Innovation - Interest Piques | Scoop.it
The Many Cultures of Innovation
Wired
The word “innovation” buzzes around business today.
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Can Productivity and Creativity Coincide?

Can Productivity and Creativity Coincide? | Creativity & Innovation - Interest Piques | Scoop.it
For many entrepreneurs, routine improves productivity, but how does it affect creativity? Thought leaders from around the world weigh in... (RT @JayRHenley: The Routine Gene - Can #Productivity and #Creativity Coincide?
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