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How To Unlock Creativity

How To Unlock Creativity | Creativity - Problem Solving | Scoop.it

"Do you know this guy on the left? Of course you do! The man, and in particular that photo, are icons. They represent creativity itself.

Yet Einstein is both an inspiration and an intimidation. His legend, unfortunately, has obscured much his story’s true value. He was, in many ways, unexceptional, but nevertheless managed to see the world differently and led others to do so as well."


Via Beth Dichter
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Callie Carling's curator insight, July 30, 2013 10:08 AM

add your insight...

creativity@NIS's curator insight, August 25, 2014 3:40 AM

John: Really love this photo.

 

Brian: Yup,

Arts & Creators's curator insight, October 6, 2014 12:39 PM

How to unlock Creativity

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33 Brainstorming Tips, in 140 characters or less

Brainstorm creative ideas with these 33 tips, each summarized in 140 characters or less. For sources used in this design, check out the complete blog post at: …
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Demystifying the muse: 5 creativity myths you need to stop believing

Demystifying the muse: 5 creativity myths you need to stop believing | Creativity - Problem Solving | Scoop.it
There’s a letter from an 1815 issue of General Music Journal where Mozart describes his creative process as instantaneous: no struggle or writer’s block. The muse simply showed up and he was ready. The problem? The letter is a fraud. Much like […]
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Simulating Creativity from a Systems Perspective

Simulating Creativity from a Systems Perspective | Creativity - Problem Solving | Scoop.it

Psychological research on human creativity focuses primarily on individual creative performance. Assessing creative performance is, however, also a matter of expert evaluation. Few psychological studies model this aspect explicitly as a human process, let alone measure creativity longitudinally. An agent-based model was built to explore the effects contextual factors such as evaluation and temporality have on creativity. Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi's systems perspective of creativity is used as the model's framework, and stylized facts from the domain of creativity research in psychology provide the model's contents. Theoretical experimentation with the model indicated evaluators and their selection criteria play a bearing role in constructing human creativity. This insight has major implications for designing future creativity research in psychology.

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To Be More Creative, Cheer Up - Issue 20: Creativity - Nautilus

To Be More Creative, Cheer Up - Issue 20: Creativity - Nautilus | Creativity - Problem Solving | Scoop.it
I pour a cup of coffee, sharpen my pencil, and get ready to create. I’ve dusted off a half-conceived novel outline I abandoned three…
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The Messy Minds of Creative People | Beautiful Minds, Scientific American Blog Network

The Messy Minds of Creative People | Beautiful Minds, Scientific American Blog Network | Creativity - Problem Solving | Scoop.it

Creativity is very messy.

According to one prominent theory, the creative process involves four stages:  preparation, incubation, illumination, and verification. This is all well in good in theory

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Proceedings | ICCC 2014

Proceedings | ICCC 2014 | Creativity - Problem Solving | Scoop.it

Fifth International Conference on Computational Creativity

Ljubljana, Slovenia, 9th – 13th June 2014

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Why Most Writing Tips Are Useless (and How to Really Up Your Game)

Why Most Writing Tips Are Useless (and How to Really Up Your Game) | Creativity - Problem Solving | Scoop.it

You’re impatient to become a better writer.

So naturally you love writing tips.

You eagerly devour each new one, hoping to give your writing brain a small but valuable upgrade.

But in practice, new tips appear so regularly that you struggle to keep up.

You don’t know which tips to try and which to ignore, and each new practice is quickly replaced by the next.

One week you’re trying to use more emotion in your writing. The next, fewer adjectives. After that, it’s all about empathy.

You end up switching tactics so often that you can’t tell which tips are working and which are simply wasting your time.

Surely there’s an answer? A solution must exist that lies somewhere between trying everything and ignoring everything.

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Published for the First Time: a 1959 Essay by Isaac Asimov on Creativity

Published for the First Time: a 1959 Essay by Isaac Asimov on Creativity | Creativity - Problem Solving | Scoop.it
 

Note from Arthur Obermayer, friend of the author:

In 1959, I worked as a scientist at Allied Research Associates in Boston. The company was an MIT spinoff that originally focused on the effects of nuclear weapons on aircraft structures. The company received a contract with the acronym GLIPAR (Guide Line Identification Program for Antimissile Research) from the Advanced Research Projects Agency to elicit the most creative approaches possible for a ballistic missile defense system. The government recognized that no matter how much was spent on improving and expanding current technology, it would remain inadequate. They wanted us and a few other contractors to think “out of the box.”

When I first became involved in the project, I suggested that Isaac Asimov, who was a good friend of mine, would be an appropriate person to participate. He expressed his willingness and came to a few meetings. He eventually decided not to continue, because he did not want to have access to any secret classified information; it would limit his freedom of expression. Before he left, however, he wrote this essay on creativity as his single formal input. This essay was never published or used beyond our small group. When I recently rediscovered it while cleaning out some old files, I recognized that its contents are as broadly relevant today as when he wrote it. It describes not only the creative process and the nature of creative people but also the kind of environment that promotes creativity.

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"The Art of Thought", Graham Wallas

"The Art of Thought", Graham Wallas | Creativity - Problem Solving | Scoop.it

A classic, finally available after a long eclipse, and in ebook format too.

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Teaching Creativity

Teaching Creativity | Creativity - Problem Solving | Scoop.it

Creativity may need the right conditions in order to flourish in an organization, but can it actually be taught?

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The Theory Underlying Concept Maps and How to Construct and Use Them

The Theory Underlying Concept Maps and How to Construct and Use Them | Creativity - Problem Solving | Scoop.it
concept maps concept mapping knowledge models meaningful learning cmaptools (The Theory Underlying Concept Maps and How to Construct and Use Them http://t.co/4XegBGTy1W Institute for Human and Machine...

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The Philosophy of Creativity

The Philosophy of Creativity | Creativity - Problem Solving | Scoop.it
This collection of new essays on creativity integrates philosophical insights with empirical research.
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susanna oreskovic's curator insight, June 8, 2014 1:34 PM

Good read if you have the time to actually read and mull over ideas. Something we don't allow ourselves to do these days. Sit down and read a little.

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We're About to Tell You the Secret to Creativity, and You May NOT Want to Sit Down - InformED

We're About to Tell You the Secret to Creativity, and You May NOT Want to Sit Down - InformED | Creativity - Problem Solving | Scoop.it

The study found that walking indoors or outdoors similarly boosted creative inspiration. The act of walking itself, and not the environment, was the main factor. A person walking indoors – on a treadmill in a room facing a blank wall – produced twice as many creative responses compared to a person sitting down.


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Anne Whisken's curator insight, May 8, 2014 7:51 PM

'It’s important to note that, according to the study, the type of creativity affected by walking is associated with “divergent,” rather than “convergent,” thinking. In other words, walking benefits creative brainstorming but not the kind of focused thinking required for single, correct answers.'

Cited From: http://www.opencolleges.edu.au/informed/news/creativity-and-walking/#ixzz31Ag3q0vI

Character Minutes's curator insight, May 14, 2014 4:55 PM

Great info to share with the trait of creativity.

Γιώργος Παπαναστασίου's curator insight, May 17, 2014 6:17 AM

Κάτι ήξερε και ο Αριστοτέλης: 

http://el.wikipedia.org/wiki/%CE%A0%CE%B5%CF%81%CE%B9%CF%80%CE%B1%CF%84%CE%B7%CF%84%CE%B9%CE%BA%CE%AE_%CE%A3%CF%87%CE%BF%CE%BB%CE%AE

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Beyond Big and Little: The Four C Model of Creativity - James C. Kaufman&Ronald A. Beghetto

Most investigations of creativity tend to take one of two directions: everyday creativity (also called “little-c”), which can be found in nearly all people, and eminent creativity (also called “Big-C”), which is reserved for the great. In this paper, the authors propose a Four C model of creativity that expands this dichotomy. Specifically, the authors add the idea of “mini-c,” creativity inherent in the learning process, and Pro-c, the developmental and effortful progression beyond little-c that represents professional-level expertise in any creative area. The authors include different transitions and gradations of these four dimensions of creativity, and then discuss advantages and examples of the Four C Model.

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Creativity in Mathematics: Inquiry-Based Learning and the Moore Method - YouTube

Creativity in Mathematics: Inquiry-Based Learning and the Moore Method explores the world of Inquiry-Based Learning and seeks to identify the reasons behind its celebrated success. More than twenty-five influential teachers, top researchers, inventors, and leaders of industry attest to the life changing rewards that began for them in a classroom taught by IBL and the Moore Method.

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Compendium of Creative Problem Solving Methods

Compendium of Creative Problem Solving Methods | Creativity - Problem Solving | Scoop.it
This is a project I’ve been working on for quite a while… Every time I come across a new creative problem solving (CPS) method, I map it out with the rest of my collection. I’ve adapted the standard CPS process for use at Idea Sandbox.

Via Zigmas Bigelis
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Zigmas Bigelis's curator insight, January 23, 4:18 AM

Short visualized categorization of problem solving methods

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The Lovelace 2.0 Test of Artificial Creativity and Intelligence

Observing that the creation of certain types of artistic artifacts necessitate intelligence, we present the Lovelace 2.0 Test of creativity as an alternative to the Turing Test as a means of determining whether an agent is intelligent. The Lovelace 2.0 Test builds off prior tests of creativity and additionally provides a means of directly comparing the relative intelligence of different agents.

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How We Can Improve Our Decisions

How We Can Improve Our Decisions | Creativity - Problem Solving | Scoop.it
Better decisions are a function of two things that sometimes conflict: making fewer mistakes and having better insights.
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The Art of Computational Creativity

The Art of Computational Creativity | Creativity - Problem Solving | Scoop.it
An edited transcript of a panel discussion on 'Computational Creativity and the Arts' from the Fifth International Conference on Computational Creativity serves as the prompt to a discussion of meta-level issues in the field of computational creativity.
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Throwing Off the Wet Blanket

Throwing Off the Wet Blanket | Creativity - Problem Solving | Scoop.it

You spend years writing stories as quickly as your fingers can fly across the keyboard, thrilled with the ideas, the characters, the dialogue, the action, EVEYTHING.  Every stolen moment is spent adding to the word count, and those stolen moments are absolutely necessary because the story is always right there at the edge of your thoughts.  It’s ready.  You’re ready.  It’s all flow.  You are the ruler of all story!

Then you learn a New Thing—possibly the most wonderful and accurate and encouraging New Thing any writer could dream of—and yet your stories grind to a halt.  Words that once spilled effortlessly onto the page become painful little treasures to be counted one at a time as they are pushed through the keyboard.  Days that used to yield thousands of fantastic, reader-believed words might now give you a few hundred painfully-awkward words that’ll need much revising.  Stories that used to seem so natural and alive and perfect now sound stilted and dull and derivative.  Everything is wrong.

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A New Course on Creativity in an Engineering Program: Foundations and Issues

The importance of innovation in the world's economy, now undeniable, draws great attention to the need to improve organizations' creative potential. In the last 60 years, hundreds of books have been written on the subject and hundreds of webpages display information on how to be more creative and achieve innovation. Several North American and European universities offer graduated programs in creativity. However, building an effective and validated creativity training program is not without challenges. Because of the nature of their work, engineers are often asked to be innovative. Without aiming for a degree in creativity, could future engineers benefit from training programs in creativity? This article presents the conceptual framework and pedagogical elements of a new course in creativity for engineering students.

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Micro Manager vs. Macro Planner: Zadie Smith on the Two Types of Writers and the Secret of Editing Your Work

Micro Manager vs. Macro Planner: Zadie Smith on the Two Types of Writers and the Secret of Editing Your Work | Creativity - Problem Solving | Scoop.it
“It’s a feeling of happiness that knocks me clean out of adjectives.
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Creativity & Full Bucket Syndrome

Creativity & Full Bucket Syndrome | Creativity - Problem Solving | Scoop.it
As leaders, we value creativity and innovation, largely because they lead to relevant, financially viable organizations in the long-term. So why do we then do everything in our power to quash creat...
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Studying Collective Human Decision Making and Creativity with Evolutionary Computation

We report a summary of our interdisciplinary research project "Evolutionary Perspective on Collective Decision Making" that was conducted through close collaboration between computational, organizational and social scientists at Binghamton University. We redefined collective human decision making and creativity as evolution of ecologies of ideas, where populations of ideas evolve via continual applications of evolutionary operators such as reproduction, recombination, mutation, selection, and migration of ideas, each conducted by participating humans. Based on this evolutionary perspective, we generated hypotheses about collective human decision making using agent-based computer simulations. The hypotheses were then tested through several experiments with real human subjects. Throughout this project, we utilized evolutionary computation (EC) in non-traditional ways---(1) as a theoretical framework for reinterpreting the dynamics of idea generation and selection, (2) as a computational simulation model of collective human decision making processes, and (3) as a research tool for collecting high-resolution experimental data of actual collaborative design and decision making from human subjects. We believe our work demonstrates untapped potential of EC for interdisciplinary research involving human and social dynamics.

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Is Grit Stifling Our Creativity?

Is Grit Stifling Our Creativity? | Creativity - Problem Solving | Scoop.it
Stressed out, relentless, martyrdom is often viewed as part and parcel of success.
From the sleepless persona of the Tech entrepreneurs, to the ubiquitous chatter around “grit,” tenacity has become synonymous with achievement. Yet, new emergent research is illustrating that perhaps dogged determination has been glamorized far beyond its usefulness.
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Jocelyn Stoller's curator insight, August 29, 2014 6:15 AM

Focusing on "grit" can be damaging to motivation and innate love of learning. Austerity policies undermine the healthy foundations of a society. Both are based on outdated values and premises linked to Calvinism, authoritarianism, Social Darwinism and the Fundamental Attribution Fallacy.