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Creativity and visual practice
Creatviity in relation to visual facilitation, data viz, collective intelligence, and facilitation in general
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Late Bloomers - The New Yorker

Late Bloomers - The New Yorker | Creativity and visual practice | Scoop.it

"sBen Fountain was an associate in the real-estate practice at the Dallas offices of Akin, Gump, Strauss, Hauer & Feld, just a few years out of law school, when he decided he wanted to write fiction. The only thing Fountain had ever published was a law-review article. His literary training consisted of a handful of creative-writing classes in college. He had tried to write when he came home at night from work, but usually he was too tired to do much. He decided to quit his job.

Roberta Faulhaber's insight:

Experimental vs. conceptual creativity.  So much for the straightforward "creativity" models...

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Sylvia Plath’s Unseen Drawings, Edited by Her Daughter and Illuminated in Her Private Letters

Sylvia Plath’s Unseen Drawings, Edited by Her Daughter and Illuminated in Her Private Letters | Creativity and visual practice | Scoop.it
"It gives me such a sense of peace to draw; more than prayer, walks, anything. I can close myself completely in the line, lose myself in it.
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This is how professional designers create their logos

This is how professional designers create their logos | Creativity and visual practice | Scoop.it
Yesterday we saw here that famous logos can have hidden meanings, almost like easter eggs designers use to enrich them. But how do those logos come to life? Designer Aaron Draplin explains in this video how his creative process works.
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The Remarkable Power Of Visual Metaphors To Make Us More Creative

The Remarkable Power Of Visual Metaphors To Make Us More Creative | Creativity and visual practice | Scoop.it
Figurative images, such as an illuminated or a blown bulb, can improve our insightsbut they can also dim them.
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How to Do Nothing with Nobody All Alone by Yourself: A Timely Vintage Field Guide to Self-Reliant Play and Joyful Solitude

How to Do Nothing with Nobody All Alone by Yourself: A Timely Vintage Field Guide to Self-Reliant Play and Joyful Solitude | Creativity and visual practice | Scoop.it
A celebration of makers and hackers from half a century before they were called makers and hackers.

Legendary psychoanalyst Adam Phillips
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Night vision drives creativity-Telegraph

Night vision drives creativity-Telegraph | Creativity and visual practice | Scoop.it
The truly creative believe that boundaries are made to be broached. Some of the greatest artists, scientists, leaders, thinkers, visionaries and writers have packed more into their days by staying awake in the dark hours, as Annabel Venning explains
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Here's Why, How, And What You Should Doodle To Boost Your Memory And Creativity

Here's Why, How, And What You Should Doodle To Boost Your Memory And Creativity | Creativity and visual practice | Scoop.it
The author of The Doodle Revolution explains how this common "time waster" is really a creative launch-pad.
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Visual Learning Mythbusters

Visual Learning Mythbusters | Creativity and visual practice | Scoop.it
You find this questionable statistic all over the dang place:83% of people
are visual learners.

From Stanley Kubrik's A Clockwork Orange (1971)

Sometimes it appears as 65% or some other percentage. Yet rarely — if ever—
is that number attributed to any clinical research. 

Our friends at ImageThink point towards a likely source of this idea.

Research conducted by Richard Felder resulted in a standardized test called
the Index of Learning Styles (ILS) which sorts learners according to
several different spectra, including visual-verbal.

And who doesn't love themselves a standardized test?

But that research was done well before fMRIs became available to measure
brain activity and produce activation maps showing which parts of the brain
are involved in a particular mental process.

(Felder's research was done primarily with — gasp! — engineering students.)

Unlike standardized tests, fMRIs work by detecting the changes in blood
oxygenation and flow that occur in response to neural activity. When a
brain area is more active it consumes more oxygen and, to meet this
increased demand, blood flow increases to the active area.

The resulting activation maps can show us how our brains biologically react
to thoughts and external stimuli. And what have these images revealed?
Learning is a whole brain activity and no matter what kind of learning
activity we are engaged in, we are making movies in our mind.

Now, for me — a former art school student, professional image maker and
chronic daydreamer — saying that 83% of people are visual learners is like
declaring: 

“Study finds that 83% of people think that legs make walking easier!”

Or this claim from our favorite fake news newspaper, The Onion: “Study
finds High School students retain only one-third of obsolete curriculum
over summer”

So, why then is the 83% stat slung about so freely?


The Peer Pressure to Produce Percentages

photo: The Uniform House of Dixie by Dystopos (Flickr Creative Commons)

A huge motivation may be our human need for social proof — also known as 
informational social influence — in order to validate an activity.

Social proof  is a psychological phenomenon where people assume the actions
of others in an attempt to reflect correct behavior for a given situation.

Simply put, people want to make sure the behavior is alright — whether that
behavior is wearing leather pants to a wedding, sporting a bow tie and a 
mullet hairstyle (which I did briefly in the late 80s) or allowing someone
to draw big pictures during the boss' big presentation.

Think about the social calculus of High School, but with strategic planning
sessions, careers, and mortgages on the line.

Ultimately, any professional who takes a chance to incorporate a new and
artsy element, like graphic facilitation ( ! ), to a corporate event is
taking a risk.

Granted, this particular risk (graphic facilitation) does not involve
potential bodily harm or worldwide economic collapse.

No, this risk is of something much worse in the eyes of many — the fear of
failing publicly.

More specifically, the fear may be of wasting time and treasure on
something that does not yield concrete, quantifiable benefits.

Matthew McConaughey in his breakout role from Dazed and Confused (1993)

Hence, the affirmation that 83% of us need visuals to help us on our
learning journey may be just the thing to make a jittery client feel
alright, alright, alright!


Visual Learner, Schmisual Learner

photo: Stefan the Photofan (Flickr Creative Commons)

In a 2013 article in Scientific American, Sophie Guter asks if teaching to
the student's style is bogus.

This may be anathema in a world of user-centered design and
student-centered learning environments, but from her vantage point, she
finds an educational landscape where many researchers suggest that
differences in students’ learning styles may be as important as ability,
but that empirical evidence is thin.

There is no shortage of ideas in the professional literature. David
Kolb of Case Western Reserve University posits that personality divides
learners into categories based on how actively or observationally they
learn and whether they thrive on abstract concepts or concrete ones.
Another conjecture holds that sequential learners understand
information best when it is presented one step at a time whereas
holistic learners benefit more from seeing the big picture.
Psychologists have published at least 71 different hypotheses on
learning styles.

Perhaps, this speaks less to learning styles — visual vs. kinesthetic vs.
linguistic vs. mathematical — and more to this fact: any disengaged person
ain't learning much.

A surefire way to engage learners of any age, is through consciously
crafted stories and experiences that involve multiple senses and trigger
multiple parts of our brains — without cognitive overload.

(Hello, Ritalin!)


Mythbusting Brains & Masters of the Mind

ABOVE: Illustration by one of my heroes, Dave Gray (source: Flickr,
Creative Commons)

Because we are all visual learners — even blind folk, as you will learn by
reading further down — I have collected some videos that have expanded my
own horizons when it comes to understanding brains, visuals, and learning.

Below are several subject matter experts who explore the complexity of
human neural networks to reveal rich constellations of biology, cognition,
creativity and learning…

Antonio Damasio

“This rich film is continuously rolling in our minds.” Researchers
like Antonio and his wife Hanna use imaging technology to explore the
biological architecture influencing experiences that have traditionally
remained the stuff of philosophy: The Mind, The Self, Consciousness and
Culture. Like no one else, Damasio describes the biology that enables our
memories and imagination.

What I Learned: Our ability to visualize emanates from our physical bodies,
through the oldest parts of our brain stem, and echoes throughout our
cerebral cortex. Now, I cannot trust anything I think or feel after hearing
Damasio describe consciousness.

http://www.ted.com/talks/antonio_damasio_the_quest_to_understand_consciousness


David Eagleman

“Are we free to choose how we act? Is the mind equal to the brain?” 
A neuroscientist at Baylor College of Medicine in Houston, Eagleman's
research includes time perception, vision, synesthesia, and the
intersection of neuroscience with the legal system. He is a pioneer on the
power of the unconscious brain.

What I Learned: I asked David where dreams come from. He answered that
dreaming is our brains natural function; it uses the body to check if the
dream is reality!

http://poptech.org/popcasts/david_eagleman_brain_over_mind


Daniel Kish

“They call me the real life batman. My claim to fame is that I click.” 
World Access for the Blind, founded by Kish, trains the visually impaired
to achieve greater freedom and mobility through echolocation — a technique
that simulates a bat’s night vision of perceiving the environment through
sound.

What I Learned: Kish taught me that unless severely damaged, all humans,
regardless of visual ability, rely heavily on the visual cortex to navigate
and shape their world.

http://poptech.org/popcasts/daniel_kish_blind_vision


Scott Barry Kaufman

“Depending on what you are creating, the stimulus, the content and what
stage of the creative process you are in, different brain areas are
recruited to help solve the task.” Cognitive psychologist by training,
Kaufman unravels some of creativity’s mysterious origins with the help of
brain scanning equipment. Kaufman's blog on the Scientific American
website, Beautiful Minds, shares Insights into intelligence, creativity,
and the mind.

What I Learned: The Left-Brain vs. Right-Brain debate is a farce: we are
all whole-brained people, yet the phenomenon of “talent” and ”creativity”
is vast and mysterious. 

http://poptech.org/popcasts/scott_barry_kaufman_creative_brains


Pawan Sinha 

“Being a blind kid in India is tremendously tough.” Sinha's humanitarian
and scientific work sheds light on how the brain's visual system
develops. Sinha and his team provide free vision-restoring treatment to
children born blind, and then study how their brains learn to interpret
visual data. The work offers insights into neuroscience, engineering and
even autism.

What I Learned: The brain (not the eye) is what integrates all the
different visual elements we see into objects we can understand; the one
thing that the visual system needs in order to parse the world is motion
.  

http://www.ted.com/talks/pawan_sinha_on_how_brains_learn_to_see


Duygu Kuzum 

“Have you ever seen the super computer, Watson? It is bigger than my
apartment.” Kuzum develops nanoelectronic synaptic devices which emulate
synaptic computation in the human brain, then works to interface these
synapses with biological neurons. Such nanoscale synaptic devices have the
potential to lead to interactive brain-inspired computer systems that can
learn and process information in real time, bridging the gap between the
human brain and digital computers.

What I Learned: The brain is so freaking efficient for the amount of
processing it can do! Powered by less energy it takes to light a lightbulb,
the human brain is really tough to replicate mechanically—or digitally!

 http://www.alphachimp.com/poptech-art/duygu-kuzum


  Miriah Meyer

“We need to move beyond the idea that data visualization is about pretty
pictures, and instead embrace that it is a deep investigation into
sense-making.” Meyer explains how data visualization can be more concise,
practical and scientifically useful, and still be aesthetically pleasing.

What I Learned: Good data graphics can accelerate the progress of
scientific research—not simply serve as a nice illustration of that
research. 

http://www.alphachimp.com/poptech-art/miriah-meyer-seeing-data



QUESTION FOR YOU: What has your research revealed about visual learning?
Let us know in the comments below!
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Neuroscientists Say We're Wired To Enjoy Art

Neuroscientists Say We're Wired To Enjoy Art | Creativity and visual practice | Scoop.it
MRI scans demystify what happens when we peer at a Van Gogh or ponder a Picasso.
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Study Finds Making Art May Keep Our Brains Healthy

Study Finds Making Art May Keep Our Brains Healthy | Creativity and visual practice | Scoop.it
We've all heard about art's psychological and physiological effects. Researchers have found, for instance, that a lunchtime jaunt to an art gallery can reduce work-related stress, and that creating...
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How Emotional Connections Can Trigger Creativity and Learning

How Emotional Connections Can Trigger Creativity and Learning | Creativity and visual practice | Scoop.it
Scientists are always uncovering new ways into how people learn best, and some of the most recent neuroscience research has shown connections between basic su
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Neuroaesthetics | The Scientist Magazine®

Neuroaesthetics | The Scientist Magazine® | Creativity and visual practice | Scoop.it
Researchers unravel the biology of beauty and art.
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The Agony of the Artist (with a capital A): E.E. Cummings on What It Really Means to Be an Artist and His Little-Known Line Drawings

The Agony of the Artist (with a capital A): E.E. Cummings on What It Really Means to Be an Artist and His Little-Known Line Drawings | Creativity and visual practice | Scoop.it
"The Artist is no other than he who unlearns what he has learned, in order to know himself."

"You’re an artist when you say you are," A
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Four Disney Background Artists Paint A Tree In Their Iconic Styles | Hedonistica

Four Disney Background Artists Paint A Tree In Their Iconic Styles | Hedonistica | Creativity and visual practice | Scoop.it
So turns out Disney artists are ridiculously talented. And also ridiculously stylish. Who shows up to paint wearing a suit?!
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The Secret to Smart Groups: It's Women

The Secret to Smart Groups: It's Women | Creativity and visual practice | Scoop.it
Women are better than men at knowing what other people are thinking, and that carries huge advantages in team settings
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La zone de confort expliquée en stop motion

Qu'est-ce que la zone de confort ? Votre espace quotidien. Le trajet au travail, à l'école, votre vie de famille ou de couple, votre entourage. Mais rester définitivement dans ce cercle ne l'élargira jamais et vous aurez toujours plus de mal à faire des découvertes. Lien article : http://www.konbini.com/fr/lifestyle/zone-de-confort-stop-motion/
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▶ Visioning Collage Art - YouTube

▶ Visioning Collage Art - YouTube | Creativity and visual practice | Scoop.it
A short film featuring visioning collages created by artist and art therapist Gretchen Miller.
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Montre-moi ton agenda, je te dirai à quel grand artiste tu ressembles

Montre-moi ton agenda, je te dirai à quel grand artiste tu ressembles | Creativity and visual practice | Scoop.it
RÉUSSIR AUTREMENT - Que ferait Victor Hugo à ma place ? Si vous vous êtes toujours posé la question, ne cherchez plus, cette infographie réalisée par le site Podio sur la routine quotidienne de 26 des art...
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lynda.com Training | 21-Day Drawing Challenge

lynda.com Training | 21-Day Drawing Challenge | Creativity and visual practice | Scoop.it
Take 21-day journey to improve your drawing skills and incorporate drawing into your life as a daily practice.
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Secrets of the Creative Brain

Secrets of the Creative Brain | Creativity and visual practice | Scoop.it
A leading neuroscientist who has spent decades studying creativity shares her research on where genius comes from, whether it is dependent on high IQ—and why it is so often accompanied by mental illness. 
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A Learning Secret: Don’t Take Notes with a Laptop

A Learning Secret: Don’t Take Notes with a Laptop | Creativity and visual practice | Scoop.it
Students who used longhand remembered more and had a deeper understanding of the material
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The Unusual Habits Of 8 Famous Creative Minds

The Unusual Habits Of 8 Famous Creative Minds | Creativity and visual practice | Scoop.it
From Jay-Z to de Balzac, these famous creative minds have developed some odd habits on the path to genius.
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On the Edge of Chaos: Where Creativity Flourishes

On the Edge of Chaos: Where Creativity Flourishes | Creativity and visual practice | Scoop.it
Scientists have come a long way in understanding how the brain generates creative ideas. Their work can inform classroom structures if educators want to inspire more creativity in students.
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