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Creativity and learning
A bubble-and-squeak dish of elearning, creativity, innovation and design education
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Open Source Platform Allows Anyone to Create Online Courses

Open Source Platform Allows Anyone to Create Online Courses | Creativity and learning | Scoop.it
Open Source Platform Allows Anyone to Create Online Courses

A new nonprofit project developed by eight Stanford engineers called Class2Gomight have a solution. They let anyone in the world use their open source platform to run their own online course for free.

Like many MOOC's, Class2G0 allows users to learn via videos and interactive quizzes. But because the creators "believe strongly that valuable course content shouldn't be tied to any one platform," the videos are housed on mobile device-friendly YouTube. That ethos of portability is at the heart of their Khan Academy-style practice exercises, too. Instead of the exercises "being trapped in a propriety database," they can be used anywhere, the founders say on their site. The creators simply "don't want to built or maintain more than we have to."

Clive Hilton's insight:

Let battle commence. It would appear that the common denominator in all these online learning delivery paradigms is the desire to eleminate the soggy bit that few seem prepared to admit is what actually makes the difference. So, another pedagogue-free model then.

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What My 11 Year Old's Stanford Course Taught Me About Online Education - Forbes

What My 11 Year Old's Stanford Course Taught Me About Online Education - Forbes | Creativity and learning | Scoop.it
My 11 year old son just took a course at Stanford. That has a nice ring to it but it is actually meaningless because these days anyone can take a course at Stanford. You don’t even have to pay.

 

That doesn’t make for an interesting post except that this ‘bunch of videos’ is currently being heralded as the future of higher education. In the New York Times, David Brooks saw courses like the one my son took as a tsunami about to hit campuses all over the world. And he isn’t alone. Harvard’s Clay Christensen sees it as a transformative technology that will change education forever. And along with Stanford many other institutions, most notably Harvard and MIT, are leaping into the online mix. This is attracting attention and investment dollars. It has people nervous and excited.

 

So I wondered, what happens when someone who has grown up online encountered one of these new ventures?

 

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Are MOOCs hyped?

Are MOOCs hyped? | Creativity and learning | Scoop.it

Author: Valerie Strauss

 

If you haven’t heard of MOOCs, you no doubt will, because these Massive Open Online course are becoming all the rage, tagged as the biggest thing in public education since, well, the dawn of public education. (It wasn’t long ago that the Khan Academy was). My colleague Nick Anderson reported about the emergence of the MOOCs movement as a disruptive force in higher education. But there are reasons to think MOOCs are being hyped, and below, former schools superintendent Larry Cuban explains why. Cuban is a former high school social studies teacher (14 years, including seven at Cardozo and Roosevelt high schools in the District), district superintendent (seven years in Arlington, VA) and professor emeritus of education at Stanford University, where he has taught for more than 20 years. His latest book is “As Good As It Gets: What School Reform Brought to Austin.”

 

This appeared on his blog.

 

By Larry Cuban

I have a confession to make. I dropped out of a Massive Open Online course (MOOC) on Artificial Intelligence at Stanford university in the Fall of 2011. There were over 160,000 other students in the class from all over the world. I listened to the two professors on my laptop give mini-lectures, watched fast hands scrawl quickly and cleverly over whiteboards to graphically display the concepts they were teaching. I found the information fascinating. I took a few quizzes. Then I fell behind and realized that I couldn’t keep up, given the other things I was doing so I dropped out. End of story about my first encounter with a MOOC. Turns out, however, that about 138,000 others dropped out also since only 14 percent completed the course and received a certificate.

 

 

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