Why Do Some People Learn Faster? | Creativity and learning | Scoop.it

The physicist Niels Bohr once defined an expert as “a person who has made all the mistakes that can be made in a very narrow field.” 

 

The Moser experiment is premised on the fact that there are two distinct reactions to mistakes, both of which can be reliably detected using electroenchephalography, or EEG. The first reaction is called error-related negativity (ERN). It appears about 50 milliseconds after a screw-up and is believed to originate in the anterior cingulate cortex, a chunk of tissue that helps monitor behavior, anticipate rewards and regulate attention. This neural reaction is mostly involuntary, the inevitable response to any screw-up.

 

The second signal, which is known as error positivity (Pe), arrives anywhere between 100-500 milliseconds after the mistake and is associated with awareness. It occurs when we pay attention to the error, dwelling on the disappointing result. In recent years, numerous studies have shown that subjects learn more effectively when their brains demonstrate two properties:

 

1) a larger ERN signal, suggesting a bigger initial response to the mistake and

 

2) a more consistent Pe signal, which means that they are probably paying attention to the error, and thus trying to learn from it.