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Creativity and learning
A bubble-and-squeak dish of elearning, creativity, innovation and design education
Curated by Clive Hilton
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Data Visualization & Information Design: One Learner's Perspective

This is my first slide deck designed to share. It reflects a summary and applied practice of some basic lessons learned about data visualization and information

Via Baiba Svenca
Clive Hilton's insight:

Sometimes it's worth just going back to the basics. And this is one of those times. My students - yes you, Team! - take note, please.

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Linda Allen's comment, August 26, 2013 1:42 PM
Excellent advice and steps to follow for enticing presentations.
Linda Allen's comment, August 26, 2013 1:42 PM
Excellent advice and steps to follow for enticing presentations.
Lee Hall's curator insight, August 29, 2013 3:23 PM

Teachers, please take a few minutes to see these slides.

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What Games Are: The Fun Boson Does Not Exist | TechCrunch

What Games Are: The Fun Boson Does Not Exist | TechCrunch | Creativity and learning | Scoop.it
Perhaps the biggest roadblock facing the development of generation-two social games is the addiction to metrics.
Clive Hilton's insight:

An intelligently considered article - here focussed on the gaming industry - but in my view equally applicable to the evaluation of teaching. In a world in which education administrators are looking more and more to metrics to guide strategic decisions this is accompanied by a fear of trusting teachers to do what they are good at.

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Study: School Design Can Significantly Affect Children's Grades | Wired Design | Wired.com

Study: School Design Can Significantly Affect Children's Grades | Wired Design | Wired.com | Creativity and learning | Scoop.it
A study of school design has discovered that school layouts can influence a child's development by as much as 25 percent — positively or negatively — over the course of an academic year.
Clive Hilton's insight:

This seems to be a case of common sense stating the blindingly obvious, but the implications are important. And then the politicians get involved...

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Incremental and Radical Innovation: Design Research versus Technology and Meaning Change - jnd.org

Incremental and Radical Innovation: Design Research versus Technology and Meaning Change - jnd.org | Creativity and learning | Scoop.it

ABSTRACT
We discuss the differences between incremental and radical innovation and argue that each results from different processes. We present several methods of viewing incremental and radical innovation. One is by examining the quality of product space, envisioning each product opportunity as a hill in that space where the higher one is, the better. Under this view, human-centered design methods are a form of hill climbing, extremely well suited for continuous incremental improvements but incapable of radical innovation. Radical innovation requires finding a different hill, and this comes about only through meaning or technology change. A second approach is to consider the dimensions of meaning and technology change as two dimensions and examining how products move through the resulting space. Finally, we show how innovation might be viewed as lying in the space formed by the dimension of research aimed at enhancing general knowledge and the dimension of application to practice.

 

We conclude that human-centered design, with its emphasis on iterated observation, ideation, and testing is ideally suited for incremental innovation and unlikely to lead to radical innovation. Radical innovation comes from changes in either technology or meaning. Technology-driven innovation often comes from inventors and tinkerers. Meaning-driven innovation, however, has the potential to be driven through design research, but only if the research addresses fundamental questions of new meanings and their interpretation.

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Honey, I Shrunk the CNC Machine: "Piccolo" Is the World's Smallest CNC Platform - Core77

Honey, I Shrunk the CNC Machine: "Piccolo" Is the World's Smallest CNC Platform - Core77 | Creativity and learning | Scoop.it
Industrial Design content and community site - articles, discussions, interviews and resources.

We hadn't heard from the fellas at Diatom since they sent us their Kickstarter project, the Open Source Sketchchair, last spring. Eleven months later and one world tour later, the dynamic design and digital fabrication duo from Down Under (and less-alliterative London) have partnered with a couple of collaborators at Carnegie Mellon's Computational Design Lab to present "Piccolo," a purportedly "pocket-sized stand-alone CNC platform for under $70."

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Questioning the question

Questioning the question | Creativity and learning | Scoop.it

As the director of Design-Led Innovation at Philips Design, Clive van Heerden is working to bring designers into the process of technological development.

 

Van Heerden takes issue with the fact that design is almost exclusively seen to be about beautification, rather than being acknowledged for its transformative powers. He believes that design needs to be brought into the technical research lab to help change the innovation process. “We use artists and designers from the most unlikely disciplines because they all bring different ideas and processes to the task. This helps to turn methodological tension into creative tension.”

 

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1000 Words: The Critical Dichotomies of Design - Core77

1000 Words: The Critical Dichotomies of Design - Core77 | Creativity and learning | Scoop.it

We're at the apex of our power, but the nadir of our potency. Let's start with the biggest heartbreaker of them all: We are at a moment in history when, as designers, we are at our most powerful. There is almost nothing we cannot make, enjoying the triumphs of research and development in materials science, manufacturing technology, and information systems. We can get any answer we seek through social networks, peer communities, or hired guns. We have sub-specialties at unimaginably thin slices of expertise—from ubiquitous computing to synthetic biology—and a plumbing system in the Internet that is simultaneously unprecedented in human history and entirely taken for granted.

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A step backward » Design Thinking

thoughts by Tim Brown...

The UK has long had an impressive track record of producing successful designers and engineers. Many credit that success to a focus on design within the education system. Significant investments were made in the second half of the 20th Century on design and engineering programs at the University level but more importantly for the last 20 years design and technology has been mandated as part of the core curriculum in high schools. Apparently this is now under threat as the government in the UK reduces spending and alters priorities. A number of influential designers, engineers and business folks, including James Dyson, Paul Smith, Dick Powell and Ian Callum make the argument in this video as to why this is a huge mistake.

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1000 Words: The Critical Dichotomies of Design - Core77

1000 Words: The Critical Dichotomies of Design - Core77 | Creativity and learning | Scoop.it

The design of artifacts versus the design of systems. If all of these natural collapses have demonstrated one thing, it's that we are no longer living in a world of objects and things, but rather in a world of flows and negotiations. Undoubtedly this was always the case, but the feedback we're getting from the natural world has made it unassailable. In the old design model, we had 'problems' and we had 'solutions.' A designer's job was to take a problem—a brief, a market need, a new technology looking for an embodiment—and to solve it: Here's the problem; here's a solution. Next problem please.

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Industrial Design - Research: Learning Extreme Empathy

Industrial Design - Research: Learning Extreme Empathy | Creativity and learning | Scoop.it

Industrial Design content and community site - articles, discussions, interviews and resources.

 

Great designers are great empathizers. It's what separates a design that has soul from one that's simply well-realized. In my experience as a design director and as a teacher, it's become painfully clear that the ability to connect with users is something design students must learn, as crucially as they need sketching and CAD. Unfortunately, the most common student design project has students designing with themselves as the target user. by Paul Backett


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Innovate on Purpose: Why Prototyping is integral to innovation

Innovate on Purpose: Why Prototyping is integral to innovation | Creativity and learning | Scoop.it

If a picture is worth a thousand words, then I think a prototype is worth a thousand ideas. Most ideas originate as a few words on a page, or a nascent concept in one person's head. Developing a physical prototype or representation of the idea will spawn new ideas and new insights.

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Where Are the Design Apprenticeships? - Core77

Where Are the Design Apprenticeships? - Core77 | Creativity and learning | Scoop.it

In the world of design, the portfolio is paramount, often more central than one's credentials or awards. As a designer myself, I'm more concerned with the work someone has done and is capable of. Some designers I know have found great success without a master's degree, and others with master's degrees still struggle. The reverse is true as well, of course.

 

I recently stumbled on a blog post from Annie Murphy Paul asking if apprenticeships might be an alternative to college. Here's what Robert Lerman, a professor at American University, had to say:

An apprenticeship is a structured program of work-based learning and classroom-based instruction that leads to certification in an occupation, and it involves a high level of skill demands and it covers many occupations, depending on the country. In our country, we focus more on the skilled trades in construction and in manufacturing, but it can work in many other fields.

Could that include design?

Clive Hilton's insight:

Coincidentally, I was discussing this very issue with some colleagues earlier today. Clearly, something in the air.

 

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Education Innovation's curator insight, February 18, 2013 9:15 AM

Design is such a critical part of all processes and work, great thoughts.

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Stop Designing for “Users” | ThoughtWorks Studios

Stop Designing for “Users” | ThoughtWorks Studios | Creativity and learning | Scoop.it

Most products support activities underpinned by collaboration and sharing. Designing for individuals may actually be harmful because these activities reflect ongoing transformations of artifacts, individuals, and social interactions. Focusing on individuals might improve things for one person at the cost of others. As Donald Norman says in Human-Centered Design Considered Harmful:

The more something is tailored for the particular likes, dislikes, skills, and needs of a particular target population, the less likely it will be appropriate for others.

Clive Hilton's insight:

Interesting and actually not that contentious when one gets to the heart of the argument. The message is to design for the activity, not the individual.

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Technology Is Useless If It Doesn’t Address A Human Need

Technology Is Useless If It Doesn’t Address A Human Need | Creativity and learning | Scoop.it

The power of Silicon Valley is evident in almost everything we do. But is the drastic change that technology has wrought on modern life having an effect on the world of social entrepreneurship?

 

How can our illiterate and semi-literate grandmothers use technology to tell the stories of their ongoing transformation once they return home? How can we help them communicate, measure, and evaluate their success? A challenge, indeed, but one crucial to our ensuring sustainability and full-scaling the “Barefoot Approach.”

I’m sharing this story because simply participating in the Lab was “potentially disruptive.” What we learned through the four-month process, which ended in a week of identifying and pitching a solution, went far beyond our expectations. It did not disrupt our focus, as we thought it might. It taught us a new thought process for analysis of challenges. I went into the process thinking we had no limits to our creativity and resourcefulness, but realizing our information deficit in and of itself, was a limitation.

 

Silicon Valley expanded our learnings around innovative process. We learned what key-placed resources can catalyze within an organization, essential to maximizing and leveraging them to drive more significant change.

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Design Research versus Technology and Meaning Change: A Review |

Recently, a paper was published by Professors Don Norman and Roberto Verganti on the subject of ‘Incremental and Radical Innovation’. The paper consists of a conversation between the two design thinkers upon the role of design research as a driver of innovation. Despite their varied backgrounds, both had similar arguments on the dimensions of design-driven research versus human-centric research and its effect on the interpretation of meanings. Don Norman, in one of his other papers titled ‘Technology first, needs last‘, mentions that despite the genius of many inventors, designers and tinkerers, most products arrive in the market only to fail enormously. As a consequence, he discusses the role of design research as a tool that builds on the skill of understanding the market, technology, design and the user–to gauge the best path for product innovation.

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Design = research. Interpreting data for design

The role of research is vital in any meaningful design effort. Design students can be either confused or indifferent to the demands of and requirements for research. Even for those who recognise the value of research the problem often comes at the point when it becomes necessary to make sense of all the information that’s been gathered. This short Prezi provides a simple overview of how data can be used and interpreted. It includes invented data for illustrative purposes as well as genuine examples of data interpretation as well as a YouTube clip from students who’ve undergone a research process.

The overriding lesson is that research should justify, substantiate and inform the design process.

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Act First, Do the Research Later - Core77

Act First, Do the Research Later - Core77 | Creativity and learning | Scoop.it
Industrial Design content and community site - articles, discussions, interviews and resources.

Think before acting. Sounds right, doesn't it? Think before starting to design. Yup. Do some research, learn more about the requirements, the people, the activities. Then design. It all makes sense. Which is precisely why I wish to challenge it. Sometimes it makes sense to act first, think afterwards.

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Even less 'intuitive design'

Even less 'intuitive design' | Creativity and learning | Scoop.it

In a previous post I opined, more or less, that in design specialisms such as interface design, for example, any quest for some sort of universally intuitive solution is unequivocally doomed to failure. The reason for this, I argued, is that before any user of interface-driven devices can get to grips with them they must, of necessity, call upon techniques, schemas and processes that they’ve learned, acquired or become familiar with in past engagements with similar – or even not so similar – devices. In short, users call upon experience and familiarity when faced with new interface challenges; intuition – “the ability to acquire knowledge without inference or the use of reason [1]“ – has no part to play in the process at all. Should past experience be of no use in unlocking the mysteries of a new device, then the user has no other option than to try to fathom the underlying working principles from scratch.

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Design Thinking: Change Your Life with Design Thinking

Design Thinking: Change Your Life with Design Thinking | Creativity and learning | Scoop.it

The article describes design thinking as "thinking that focuses on creating better things, while analytical thinking, which is standard in business, is choosing between things". I don't think this quite right, as creating better things clearly involves a process of choosing somewhere along the line. But the empahsis, indeed, is on creating things.

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Teach Less, Integrate More by Paul Backett - Core77

Teach Less, Integrate More by Paul Backett - Core77 | Creativity and learning | Scoop.it

So what should design schools teach? Or, more important, what should design students make sure they learn? Trends in the design field shift and evolve with incredible speed, and while schools have an obligation to stay current, they do their students a disservice when they completely overhaul their program to reflect the current vogue. The best prepared students still have a few basic skills, but use them with familiarity and fluency:

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Innovation 101

Innovation 101 | Creativity and learning | Scoop.it
The d.school's founder, IDEO's David Kelley, believes that everyone has the capacity to innovate. They just need to change the way they behave.
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