Creativity and learning
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Creativity and learning
A mish-mash of items on learning, creativity, innovation and design education
Curated by Clive Hilton
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Text mining: what do publishers have against this hi-tech research tool?

Text mining: what do publishers have against this hi-tech research tool? | Creativity and learning | Scoop.it
Researchers push for end to publishers' default ban on computer scanning of tens of thousands of papers to find links between genes and diseases...

 

This technique, called text mining, is a vital 21st-century research method. It uses powerful computers to find links between drugs and side effects, or genes and diseases, that are hidden within the vast scientific literature. These are discoveries that a person scouring through papers one by one may never notice.It is a technique with big potential. A report published by McKinsey Global Institute last year said that "big data" technologies such as text and data mining had the potential to create €250bn (£200bn) of annual value to Europe's economy, if researchers were allowed to make full use of it.

 

Unfortunately, in most cases, text mining is forbidden. Bergman, Murray-Rust, Piwowar and countless other academics are prevented from using the most modern research techniques because the big publishing companies such as Macmillan, Wiley and Elsevier, which control the distribution of most of the world's academic literature, by default do not allow text mining of the content that sits behind their expensive paywalls.

Any such project requires special dispensation from – and time-consuming individual negotiations with – the scores of publishers that may be involved.

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Manuel Lima Visualizes Knowledge in Our Interconnected World in a Brand New RSA Animated Video

Manuel Lima Visualizes Knowledge in Our Interconnected World in a Brand New RSA Animated Video | Creativity and learning | Scoop.it
Throughout 2010 and 2011, the Royal Society of the Arts (RSA) developed a series of catchy videos that feature the words of thought leaders accompanied by the fast-moving animation of Andrew Park.

 

Along the way, we have highlighted RSA talks by Stephen Pinker, Slavoj Zizek, Barbara Ehrenreich, Daniel Pink, Sir Ken Robinson, and Renata Salecl. Now, after a fairly long hiatus, the series returns — this time with Manuel Lima (senior UX design lead at Microsoft Bing) explaining how networks helps us map and create knowledge in our modern world.

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Opinion: Academia Suppresses Creativity | The Scientist

Opinion: Academia Suppresses Creativity | The Scientist | Creativity and learning | Scoop.it

Opinion: Academia Suppresses Creativity ...

 

The results of this suppression of creativity are not limited to the world of grant-funded research. The same leadership that fosters the status quo in research also affects the classroom. A university education is supposed to teach students how to think critically. However, that goal has been set aside in many of our classrooms, being traded for the less ambitious goal of memorizing facts. Curiously, when the rote memorization is emphasized, creative students are often penalized. Multiple-choice exams are the standard for testing a student’s ability to memorize facts, and creative students are usually not adept at guessing what a test writer is thinking. They are much better at solving problems, generating hypotheses, designing protocols, and developing a deep understanding of their discipline—all key aspects of good critical thinkers and professionals in science.

 

By rewarding those students who accept the current facts as gospel, rather than skills that are likely to lead to the creation of knew knowledge, universities are stifling the next generation of scientists.

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DailyGood: What the Internet Does to Your Brain

DailyGood: What the Internet Does to Your Brain | Creativity and learning | Scoop.it

The Pulitzer-Prize nominee discusses the inherent ‘shallowness’ of Web 2.0 technologies, and the troubling consequences for our brains.

 

Interview by Karen Christensen from Rotman Magazine

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Do E-Books Make It Harder to Remember What You Just Read? | Healthland | TIME.com

Do E-Books Make It Harder to Remember What You Just Read? | Healthland | TIME.com | Creativity and learning | Scoop.it

Digital books are lighter and more convenient to tote around than paper books, but there may be advantages to old technology.

 

Kate Garland, a lecturer in psychology at the University of Leicester in England, is one of the few scientists who has studied this question and reviewed the data. She found that when the exact same material is presented in both media, there is no measurable difference in student performance.

However, there are some subtle distinctions that favor print, which may matter in the long run. In one study involving psychology students, the medium did seem to matter. “We bombarded poor psychology students with economics that they didn’t know,” she says. Two differences emerged. First, more repetition was required with computer reading to impart the same information.

 

Second, the book readers seemed to digest the material more fully. Garland explains that when you recall something, you either “know” it and it just “comes to you” — without necessarily consciously recalling the context in which you learned it — or you “remember” it by cuing yourself about that context and then arriving at the answer. “Knowing” is better because you can recall the important facts faster and seemingly effortlessly.

 

 

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Using Other Peoples Stuff in Your Content - How to Do It Legally | process.arts

A really nice Video that uses voice and animation to explain the the things you need to do to use other peoples stuff legally and reduce your legal risks. Its aimed at people creating Open Educational Resources (OERs) but is equally useful to anyone thinking of using other peoples content.

 

If you need more info after watching the video then head over to this E-Content IPR (Intellectual Property Rights) Audit and Risk Management Tool to quickly get a handle on managing your resources, which was developed for the LCC NAM project - at this link http://alto.arts.ac.uk/950/

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Why the University System, as We Know It, Won’t Last …. and What’s Coming Next

Why the University System, as We Know It, Won’t Last …. and What’s Coming Next | Creativity and learning | Scoop.it

Sobering article on American university education and why student debt may serve to hasten the end the traditional system of graduate education in favour of online learning paradigms.

 

 

"It’s easy to sell books and other commodities on the web. It’s not easy to deliver a quality education. But two converging trends point toward a future when we will see the traditional university give way to an online alternative — something I wasn’t willing to bank on two years ago. First, Silicon Valley is finally focusing on e-learning. Udacity, Coursera, Kahn Academy, EdX — they’re all looking to lift e-learning out of a long period of stagnation. And, second, times are tough, and the traditional university system doesn’t care enough about managing costs, while wrongly assuming that it has a captive audience."

 

 

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The Power of Bad Ideas - Core77

The Power of Bad Ideas - Core77 | Creativity and learning | Scoop.it

Steve Portigal explores the value of 'bad' ideas and finds that they are more useful and creative than one might at first imagine.

 

"I once participated in a fascinating creativity exercise around the theme of bad ideas. The room was broken up into teams. Each team was assigned a topic and asked to come up with the worst possible idea. As you can imagine, we all dove in, producing ideas for products that assaulted eyeballs with steel blades and no end of other horrible silliness. After all the groups had finished, the exercise leader asked us to pass our ideas to the next table. Now each group was asked to design the circumstances within which the previously bad idea would become a good idea.

 

No matter how disgusting the original bad idea was, each team was easily able to flip things around. This quick and fun exercise made the notion of that framework within which "bad" is defined into something very tangible, and could be a great way to warm up a group about to begin an ideation activity.

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Who Creates The Innovator? | The Creativity Post

Who Creates The Innovator? | The Creativity Post | Creativity and learning | Scoop.it
Is intelligence important to innovation? Who creates the innovator: The parent, the teacher, the mentor, or the innovator themselves? Can passion pay the bills?

 

Who Creates The Innovator?

A review by Dr. Jonathan Wai

 

Tony Wagner’s latest book—Creating Innovators: The Making of Young People That Will Change The World—contains his thoughts on how we might nurture the important skills and attributes of children to become the innovators that we so desperately need for the future. The book itself is quite innovative in that it combines written storytelling with video storytelling (produced by Robert Compton). Wagner does not disappoint—the book is well written and the people he interviews have much to teach us.

 

 

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How Geniuses Think | The Creativity Post

How Geniuses Think | The Creativity Post | Creativity and learning | Scoop.it
Thumbnail descriptions of the thinking strategies commonly used by creative geniuses.

 

Article, Michael Michalko. Synopsis:

 

How do geniuses come up with ideas? What is common to the thinking style that produced "Mona Lisa," as well as the one that spawned the theory of relativity? What characterizes the thinking strategies of the Einsteins, Edisons, daVincis, Darwins, Picassos, Michelangelos, Galileos, Freuds, and Mozarts of history? What can we learn from them?

 

How do geniuses come up with ideas? What is common to the thinking style that produced "Mona Lisa," as well as the one that spawned the theory of relativity? What characterizes the thinking strategies of the Einsteins, Edisons, daVincis, Darwins, Picassos, Michelangelos, Galileos, Freuds, and Mozarts of history? What can we learn from them?

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Cageless Thinking: Innovation and Creativity in Education | The Creativity Post

Cageless Thinking: Innovation and Creativity in Education | The Creativity Post | Creativity and learning | Scoop.it
An exploration of how creativty is restrained by inherited values from both family and the education system.

 

Blog post, Adam Webster. Synopsis:

 

From an early age our creativity is restrained by conformity. It is our responsibility to help those around us break free from this 'cage' and think more freely.

 

Once we go to school, or perhaps long before that, we are coerced into putting all of our thoughts and ideas into a cage which is then labelled ‘preconceptions and limitations’ or ‘reality check.’

We are not born with, or in a cage; the cage is more a sort of family heirloom, passed down by previous generations of children, parents and, crucially, educators. Some cages are bigger than others and some cages even grow, or at least stretch, as time goes by.

 

Sadly though, what is more common, is for the cage to shrink. Ultimately of course, the cage represents our creativity, or at least it measures our ability to think creatively. What too few people realise, is that creativity was never supposed to live in a cage.

When it is first put in there, it struggles and fights against the bars that have surrounded it and sometimes it might even slip through the bars and briefly escape, but it is quickly told ‘no’ and is scooped up and put back in the cage.

 

Eventually, the creativity stops trying to escape and simply resorts to bouncing off the walls of the cage, constantly retreating back over ground that has been covered before. Finally, the creativity stops moving; the cage has won and begins to close in around it.

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China Daily: Teaching students to think creatively

This is an old article (Dec 2010) but it's highly relevant for anyone involved (as Iam) in the education of Chinese students at graduate and post graduate level.

 

According to the editorial, the survey confirmed what Chinese parents know, that their children rarely are challenged to use their imaginations to solve problems.

Undoubtedly, teaching students to think creatively is important. A July Newsweek Magazine article entitled "The Creativity Crisis," concluded that the "necessity of human ingenuity is undisputed." The Magazine cited a recent IBM poll of 1,500 CEOs which identified creativity as the No. 1 "leadership competency" of the future.

 

MF President Theodora Kalikow said the question Chinese educators most often asked her last month on a visit to Beijing was, "How do you teach creativity?". Without providing specifics, President Kalikow hinted that American educators could teach Chinese professors a great deal about the subject.

Other recent reports suggest that China has already begun to teach creativity. The "Newsweek Magazine" story featured an exchange between Jonathan Plucker of Indiana University and colleagues at Chinese universities.

 

When Plucker was asked to identify trends in American education, he described America's focus on standardized curriculum, rote memorization, and nationalized testing. The Chinese professors laughed. "They said, ‘You're racing toward our old model. But we're racing toward your model, as fast as we can.'"

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Inspiring Creativity In Others - DesignTAXI.com

Inspiring Creativity In Others - DesignTAXI.com | Creativity and learning | Scoop.it

Inspiring Creativity In Others...by Jeffrey Paul Baumgartner [article]

 

If you want to push others—such as colleagues, team members, children, students, sweethearts or friends—to be more creative, there are a few simple things you can do.

 

ASK QUESTIONS

The best thing you can do is ask lots of questions. In particular, ask open-ended questions (questions which require more than a “yes” or “no” answer). Answering questions makes people think, particularly if they believe you are genuinely interested in their answers. Hence you also need to acknowledge answers.

 

“Why” and “Why do you think…” questions are particularly powerful and this is doubly true if the question relates to a problem for which you are seeking creative ideas. “Why do you think sales of our electronic toilet paper dispenser are so poor?” “Why do you think people do not separate their rubbish in this neighborhood?” Such questions force people to use their imaginations in order to understand a problem, sometimes from the perspective of other people. This is great for creative thinking.

 

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Great Debate: An iPad for every child: Inevitable or impossible? | ZDNet

Great Debate: An iPad for every child: Inevitable or impossible? | ZDNet | Creativity and learning | Scoop.it
One way or the other, e-textbooks are coming. But will it be an Apple-dominated market?

 

Online debate (conducted in Feb 2012) to discuss the motion. Good views from both camps.

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Why great ideas can come from zoning out | KurzweilAI

Why great ideas can come from zoning out | KurzweilAI | Creativity and learning | Scoop.it
Psychologists at the University of California, Santa Barbara have found evidence for the value of mind-wandering.

 

The researchers presented 145 undergraduate students with two “unusual uses” tasks that gave them two minutes to list as many uses as possible for everyday objects such as toothpicks, clothes hangers and bricks.

After the two minutes were over, participants were given a 12-minute break, during which they rested, undertook a demanding memory activity that required their full attention or engaged in an undemanding reaction-time activity known to elicit mind-wandering. A fourth group of students had no break. All participants were then given four unusual-uses tasks, including the two that they had completed earlier.

 

Those students who had done the undemanding activity performed an average of 41% better at the repeated tasks the second time they tried them. By contrast, students in the other three groups showed no improvement.

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The Power of Metaphors, by Michael Michalko

The Power of Metaphors, by Michael Michalko | Creativity and learning | Scoop.it
When Pablo Picasso, the Spanish artist, was a schoolboy, he was terrible at math because whenever the teacher had him write a number on the chalkboard, he saw something different.

 

The connection between perspective and creative thinking has to do with habituation and over-familiarization. Over-familiarization with something ( an idea, a procedure, a system ) is a trap. Where creative thinking is concerned, that is the irony of the skill: the more adept you are at something, the less likely you are to look at it in a different way; the greater your skill of a particular discipline, the less you will be tempted to experiment with different approaches. Einstein put it best when he once said, "An expert is a person who has few new ideas; a beginner is a person with many."

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Is America Becoming an “Idiocracy?” | The Creativity Post

Is America Becoming an “Idiocracy?” | The Creativity Post | Creativity and learning | Scoop.it

Michael Michalko article: We are taught to think reproductively, not productively.

 

"We are mentally lazy. Our education has conditioned our brains to circumvent deliberative and creative thinking wherever possible through rote memorization and robotic learning of formulas and principles. We have not been taught how to think for ourselves, we have been taught what to think based on what past thinkers thought. We are taught to think reproductively, not productively. We have been trained to seek out the neural path of least resistance, searching out responses that have worked in the past, rather than approach a problem on its own terms. This kind of thinking is dehumanizing and naturalizes intellectual laziness which promotes an impulse toward doing whatever is easiest or doing nothing at all."

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Innovating China: Education(Creativity)=Innovation | ChinAnalyst

Innovating China: Education(Creativity)=Innovation | ChinAnalyst | Creativity and learning | Scoop.it

Why is China’s economy growing so much faster than its ‘intellectual footprint’? Shouldn’t the success of the world’s second largest economy be built as much on its ideas as its exports?

 

Many diagnose this problem by pointing to creativity. But after having spent some time looking at this issue through a few different lenses, it’s increasingly apparent that Chinese entrepreneurs aren’t lacking in creativity and resourcefulness. Instead, many signs seem to suggest that it’s two broad areas that stifle or act as a disincentive for innovation:

1) the burden of having gone through the Chinese school system, and

2) the many systemic barriers to business innovation inherent in the Chinese economy.

 

Fortunately, the former is not insurmountable.

Education and teachers in general have an immense impact on our lives. They can either encourage our innate curiosity and equip us with the tools to grow and adapt in a dynamic world or they can harm our self confidence and burden us with reticence and inadequacy.

An unfortunate reality of modern China is its education system, particularly K-12. I never cease to be amazed by how deleterious an affect that its test-focused, high pressure methodology has on the development of student’s intellectual curiosity—a foundation for critical thought and adaptability.

 

There is very little room for practicum, there is very little tolerance for divergent thinking and incisive inquiry, and there is absolute focus on quantity, memorization, and competition. The needs of the individual student are lost—almost intentionally—in a rat race of exams, pressure, and weekend tutoring.

 

Changes are underway.

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450 Free Online Courses from Top Universities

450 Free Online Courses from Top Universities | Creativity and learning | Scoop.it
Get free online courses from the world’s leading universities. This collection includes over 400 free courses in the liberal arts and sciences. Download these audio & video courses straight to your computer or mp3 player.
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LYNX ANARCHY: The World's First Invisible Ad

For all our L-E-G-E-N-D-A-R-Y fans that couldn't make it to the WORLDS FIRST INVISIBLE AD in Sydney -- this is what went down.... babes, swimming dogs, fire ...

 

[YouTube video] Very clever viral advert from Lynx featuring an ordinary  house in Sydney, a bundle of modified LCD screens made to look like the house windows and polarised sunglasses. The windows look blank until viewed through the polaroid sunglasses, upon which all is revealed...

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Hold Your Horses Jonah Lehrer! – Steps Towards the Science of Creativity | The Creativity Post

Hold Your Horses Jonah Lehrer! – Steps Towards the Science of Creativity | The Creativity Post | Creativity and learning | Scoop.it
Scientific studies on creativity require an understanding of “creativity-in-context”, a multilayered, critical investigation of data coming from different disciplines.

 

Article: Milena Z. Fisher Ph.D.

 

The subject of “creativity” is awfully popular these days, and yet nobody knows exactly what “creativity” really is. Johan Lehrer, in his book Imagine tries to tackle the subject. He elegantly and effortlessly skims through different aspects of creativity, telling fascinating, artfully crafted stories about creative people and various aspects of the “science of creativity”. The book is charming and engaging, so it is quite disappointing that along with this beautiful literature some of his claims aren’t very well supported. Lehrer worked in a neuroscience lab, so he should know better that we are far, far away from the real “science of creativity” and even more importantly we are probably not on the right track yet.

 

In my opinion, the right way to approach the subject is by establishing a model of interdisciplinary studies on creativity. I don’t believe that we can research creativity without paying attention to its context, and to say it even stronger: some fast-and-loose generalizations and impressions of “how creativity really works” might backfire and stifle further research.

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Cognitive Creativity | The Creativity Post

Cognitive Creativity | The Creativity Post | Creativity and learning | Scoop.it
Do you work in a creative industry? In the digital age, the answer is ‘yes,’ whatever your profession. All you need to do is understand your potential – and then unlock it.

 

The digital revolution has popped the cork on creativity. Filmmakers no longer need to rely solely on studios to release their movies when YouTube and Vimeo reach an audience of millions. Writers can choose traditional publishers, or newer options like Amazon and eBooks. Musicians can skip six months in a studio for five minutes in a bedroom with a laptop. We have more outlets for creativity than ever before, but how do we harness the tools at our fingertips to make the most of our potential? Does it take a certain type of brain to produce these results, or can we learn to be creative, no matter what field we work in?

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Brain Stimulation Makes the 'Impossible Problem' Solvable | The Creativity Post

Brain Stimulation Makes the 'Impossible Problem' Solvable | The Creativity Post | Creativity and learning | Scoop.it
'Thinking cap' makes a virtually impossible problem — possible.

 

In their prior research, Allan Snyder and his colleagues have found that zapping the brain leads to increased insight. Enter a recent study. Richard Chi and Allan Snyder wondered: would their electric 'thinking cap' make performance on a virtually unsolvable problem-- the nine-dot problem-- solvable?

 

They gave 28 healthy right-handed participants (aged 19-63) the nine-dot problem to solve. Before brain stimulation, 0 out of 22 participants solved the problem. Then they used transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS), which is a safe, non-invasive technique that can increase or decrease cortical excitability and spontaneous neuronal firing in targeted regions. Specifically, they simultaneously decreased excitability of the left anterior temporal lobe (ATL) while they increased the excitability of the right anterior temporal lobe (ATL).

 

After 10 minutes of right lateralizing tDCS, more than 40 percent of the participants got the problem correct. For contrast, they placed sponge electrodes in the same positions of 11 other participants but they turned off the electrical current after 30 seconds. Therefore, these 'control' participants received the exact same experience as those in the active condition but didn't actually have their brain zapped. None (0/11) of the folks in this placebo condition solved the problem at any point during the experiment.

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What My 11 Year Old's Stanford Course Taught Me About Online Education - Forbes

What My 11 Year Old's Stanford Course Taught Me About Online Education - Forbes | Creativity and learning | Scoop.it
My 11 year old son just took a course at Stanford. That has a nice ring to it but it is actually meaningless because these days anyone can take a course at Stanford. You don’t even have to pay.

 

That doesn’t make for an interesting post except that this ‘bunch of videos’ is currently being heralded as the future of higher education. In the New York Times, David Brooks saw courses like the one my son took as a tsunami about to hit campuses all over the world. And he isn’t alone. Harvard’s Clay Christensen sees it as a transformative technology that will change education forever. And along with Stanford many other institutions, most notably Harvard and MIT, are leaping into the online mix. This is attracting attention and investment dollars. It has people nervous and excited.

 

So I wondered, what happens when someone who has grown up online encountered one of these new ventures?

 

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Creating research summary infographic-type poster

This Prezi was produced for students at Coventry University on the MSc Industrial Design and MSc Transport Design Courses. The students were required to produce an A1 sized poster that described their research project, its methodologies, outcomes and how it would be used to feed into their major design project.

 

The presentation itself may be of use to others who are required to create information rich documents and features advice on the creation of inforgraphics and poster layouts as well as links to external sites that are both supportive and critical of infographics.

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