Creativity and learning
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Creativity and learning
A mish-mash of items on learning, creativity, innovation and design education
Curated by Clive Hilton
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University partnerships can be shaky|Society|chinadaily.com.cn

University partnerships can be shaky|Society|chinadaily.com.cn | Creativity and learning | Scoop.it
The booming education market is luring more overseas universities to open branches or establish partnerships in China, but the marriages do not always seem happy.

 

For example, Yale Daily News recently reported that the university was terminating a joint undergraduate program with Peking University.

The Peking University-Yale University Joint Undergraduate Program, established in 2006, offered Yale students the chance to take classes taught in English by professors from both schools in Beijing for either a year or a semester.

Chinese students of Peking University were also able to take the same courses, and Yale students could join any of the 150 student organizations on campus.

 

However, ecology and evolutionary biology professor Stephen Stearns blew the whistle on the program only one year later.

In 2007, Stearns sent a strongly worded e-mail to his students at Peking University, criticizing the widespread plagiarism he witnessed among students and faculty while teaching two courses at the university.

 

"The fact that I have encountered this much plagiarism at PKU tells me something about the behavior of other professors and administrators here. They must tolerate a lot of it, and when they detect it, they cover it up without serious punishment, probably because they do not want to lose face. If they did punish it, it would not be this frequent," Stearns said in his letter.

After sending the caustic e-mail to the PKU student body, Stearns left the program.

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The March of the MOOCs: Monstrous Open Online Courses | Open Education | HYBRID PEDAGOGY

The March of the MOOCs: Monstrous Open Online Courses | Open Education | HYBRID PEDAGOGY | Creativity and learning | Scoop.it
MOOCs are like books, good when they’re good and bad when they’re bad. There is evil they can help do and evil they can help undo. Emerson writes in “The American Scholar,” “Books are the best of things, well used; abused, among the worst” (56). Cathy Davidson writes similarly about MOOCs: “There are bad versions of MOOCs, and bad versions of traditional education.” This is echoed again by Tanya Sasser: “Some variables remain the same, no matter what the medium of instruction. Boring is boring.” Like the worst college classes of every variety, the worst MOOCs supply content without helping to facilitate learning.

 

Content and learning are two separate things, often at odds with one another. “The delivery of course content is not the same as education,” Siva Vaidhyanathan writes in “What’s the Matter With MOOCs?”. He continues, “Education is an imprecise process, a dance, and a collaborative experience.” Most content is finite and contained; whereas, learning is chaotic and indeterminate. It’s relatively easy to create technological infrastructures to deliver content, harder to build relationships and learning communities to help mediate, inflect, and disrupt that content. MOOCs, though, don’t only have to be about static content. MOOCs are trainable.

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Can anyone catch Khan Academy? The fate of the U in the YouTube era | KurzweilAI

Can anyone catch Khan Academy? The fate of the U in the YouTube era | KurzweilAI | Creativity and learning | Scoop.it

Salman Khan (credit: Khan Academy) Traditional American universities are suddenly running scared of YouTube, Xconomy reports, along with Vimeo, 5min, iTunes U, TED and the Internet Archive.

 

Without YouTube, Sal Khan and Khan Academy could never have reached his 4 million unique viewers a month with their 3,200 videos, viewed 170 million times.

 

Internet video sharing technology means that talented people from outside the education establishment can make and publish free educational videos that are sometimes just as compelling as — or more than —- what’s on offer inside university classrooms.

 

Universities are scrambling to respond: this spring’s unveiling of edX, a joint online-education venture between Harvard and MIT, is just one example. But even as universities rush to put their lectures on the net, they’re vying with an explosion of new online learning resources like Coursera, Dabble, Skillshare, Udemy, and Udacity. Most are free, and most revolve around video....
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Hybridity, pt. 3: What Does Hybrid Pedagogy Do? | Hybridity | HYBRID PEDAGOGY

Hybridity, pt. 3: What Does Hybrid Pedagogy Do? | Hybridity | HYBRID PEDAGOGY | Creativity and learning | Scoop.it
As a philosophical concept, hybridity suggests hesitation at a threshold. Hybridity is not an attempt to neatly bridge the gap, but extends the moment of hesitation and thereby confuses easy categorization. And, as we allow two things to rub up against each other, two things that might not otherwise touch, we incite them to interact, allowing synthesis (and even perforation) along their boundaries.

 

byPete Rorabaugh and Jesse Stommel

 

As the digital and analog -- the physical and virtual -- commingle, we must let go of the containers for learning to which we’ve grown accustomed. We must open to random acts of pedagogy -- to connections that are, like the web, associative and lively but sometimes violent and deformed. In this, hybridity is not always safe, moving incessantly (and dangerously) toward something new -- something as yet undetermined.

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Hybridity, pt. 1: Virtuality and Empiricism | Hybridity | HYBRID PEDAGOGY

Hybridity, pt. 1: Virtuality and Empiricism | Hybridity | HYBRID PEDAGOGY | Creativity and learning | Scoop.it
Hybrid Pedagogy is an academic and networked journal of teaching and technology that combines the strands of critical and digital pedagogy to arrive at the best social and civil uses of technology and digital media in education.

 

A critical mind usually avoids binaries. We know that more than two political parties can exist, that gender is constructed, and that emphatic absolutes kill conversation. We live in a world of negotiated hybridity on a variety of levels. Everything about the word calls up a vision of science and the future: hybrid cars, hybrid humans, hybrid flower seeds. Rarely do we consider the applications of a term that floats around us and permeates our daily experiences. Hybridity, as this journal proclaims, is foundational to teaching and learning. What does this kind of hybridity imply?

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Is There a Creativity Crisis? | The Creativity Post

Is There a Creativity Crisis? | The Creativity Post | Creativity and learning | Scoop.it

According to authors Bronson and Merryman, American creativity scores, once ever-rising, are now in a state of steady decline. They cite in their Newsweek article a 2011 study authored by Professor Kim at The College of William & Mary. Dr. Kim analyzed almost 300,000 scores on a popular creativity test – The Torrance Tests of Creative Thinking. According to Kim, creativity scores have been steadily increasing until 1990, but then have sharply declined.

 

Kim’s research suggests that the decline is particularly serious for younger children. Kim’s findings are intriguing and provocative. However, it is premature for educators, parents or policy makers to panic. We need to wait to read the findings of other well-designed studies in peer-review journals before concluding that creativity is under threat. And studies need to go beyond a single measure like the Torrance Test, which is a far cry from actual measures of real-world creative products by kids.

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8 Insane Schools, Playgrounds, And Libraries Of The Future

8 Insane Schools, Playgrounds, And Libraries Of The Future | Creativity and learning | Scoop.it
Gone are the days when schools and libraries were large, impersonal institutions of learning. Today, architects are pushing the boundaries of learning spaces, putting kids in environments that we may not recognize as a school.

 

Instead of a drab classroom, students are now learning in bizarre environments, designed to stimulate their imaginations. When they go to the playground, it’s not to play on a simple jungle gym, but to interact with objects and materials that create new and exciting discoveries each time they’re outside. Learn for Life: New Architecture for New Learning chronicles some of the most exciting of these projects, from an outdoor library in Germany to a park made of recycled materials from oil rigs.

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New Far East Universities Pip UK's To Be Best In The World

New Far East Universities Pip UK's To Be Best In The World | Creativity and learning | Scoop.it
The UK has the most universities in a list of the world's best higher education establishments under the age of 50, although it fails to rank in the top five.

 

The list, which ranks the world's top 100 universities under the age of 50, is headed by Pohang University of Science and Technology in South Korea, followed by Ècole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne in Switzerland and the Hong Kong University of Science and Technology.

 

Only one US university makes it into the top 10 - the University of California in seventh place - while Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology and Université Pierre et Marie Curie in Paris make it to fifth and sixth place respectively, meaning that six countries feature in the top 10.

 

Seventeen other UK universities make it onto the 100 list, which are Warwick, Essex, Brunel, Bath, Stirling, Surrey, Plymouth, Keele, Hertfordshire, Loughborough, Strathclyde, Heriot-Watt, Liverpool John Moores, Kent, Aston, Bradford and City University London.

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In Pictures: Heatherwick exhibition

In Pictures: Heatherwick exhibition | Creativity and learning | Scoop.it
A major exhibition of the work of visionary designer Thomas Heatherwick and his studio opens at the V&A Museum in London.

 

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Reinventing Education To Teach Creativity And Entrepreneurship

Reinventing Education To Teach Creativity And Entrepreneurship | Creativity and learning | Scoop.it
As you read this, students all over the country are sitting for state standardized exams. Schools spend up to 40% of the year on test prep, so that, shall we say, no child is left behind.

 

Dan Meyer is right when he describes today’s curriculum as “paint-by-numbers classwork, robbing kids of a skill more important than solving problems: formulating them.” Imagine a world where the math textbook was replaced with open-ended, thought-provoking opportunities to question the world around us. In these classrooms, students would learn how to think, how to find problems, not just plug in numbers to solve them. What if quizzes measured kids’ ability to question, not answer?

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Singapore schools 'cut the cramming'

Singapore schools 'cut the cramming' | Creativity and learning | Scoop.it
Singapore's schools have been been hailed as an international success - but they want to move towards a more creative style of learning.

 

They want to move beyond this - towards something that cultivates creativity and what they term as ''holistic education''.Minister for Education, Heng Swee Keat, said this is ''less about content knowledge'' but ''more about how to process information".

 

He describes this challenge to innovate as being able to "discern truths from untruths, connect seemingly disparate dots, and create knowledge even as the context changes''.

 

This strategy aims to prepare today's students for the demands of the next 20 years.

It means that schools are under more pressure - and will be given more leeway - to come up with creative ways to teach the syllabus.

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Can American Universities Teach Chinese Students Creativity? | Business Beyond the Reef

Can American Universities Teach Chinese Students Creativity? | Business Beyond the Reef | Creativity and learning | Scoop.it

There’s big money being made in China now and middle / upper class families are falling over themselves to give their children the absolute best educations. (Chinese families save vigorously for many years for two things: educations for their children, and to care for their parents during retirement). Naturally, U.S. universities have carved out plenty of space to help satisfy this growing demand, sometimes though to their own detriment.

 

Don’t think for a minute universities are beyond overlooking a few entrance requirements to bring in the big spenders. It’s nothing as blatant as accepting Chinese students who score very poorly on the test scores, but more of knowingly accommodating Chinese students who have always learned by rote memory, and in some cases find it impossible to make decisions for themselves (you see problems in the China workplace stemming from rote-learning mentality– needing managers to tell them exactly what to do).

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The Dinner Series

The Dinner Series | Creativity and learning | Scoop.it
James Victore's week of brain exercises feeds meaningful thinking...

 

In sports they tell you that to become a better player, you have to practice against people more talented than you—demolishing your opponent each time will never lead to increased skills. This advice holds true in the creative realm as well, and one of the great graphic designers of our time, James Victore, is inviting a handful of budding designers to come play with him. Never one for convention, Victore began hosting a week-long workshop in his Williamsburg studio last October as a way of challenging up-and-comers to see design through his eyes while giving them a "set of wings" so they can continue to grow.

 

His provocative style extends from his own work to how he encourages others. Although a professor for many years at NYC's School of Visual Arts, Victore doesn't claim to take an academic approach. "All I know how to do is spur thinking on," he says. "I don't teach design because I don't know how to." Referring to his role as a content generator over a graphic designer, Victore focuses more on the statement made than the aesthetics behind it. The exercises he challenges the group with revolve around this ideology, each tasking them to expand their thinking. "We want to stretch your brain and hope it doesn't return to its original shape," he explains.

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Publisher launching degree course

Publisher launching degree course | Creativity and learning | Scoop.it
International publisher Pearson is setting up a college in the UK to teach degree courses, a first for a FTSE 100 company.

 

Pearson owns the Edexcel exam board, along with educational publishing interests and digital education businesses. It owns Penguin and the Financial Times.

The BSc degree course, which will be taught in Pearson's offices, will offer places from this autumn.

 

We have a network of blue-chip industry relationships”

Roxanne Stockwell Managing director, Pearson College

Tuition fees will be £6,500 per year - below the average for universities, many of which are now charging £9,000 per year.

There will be an option of an accelerated two-year course, as well as studying over three years.

 

The college will not have its own degree-awarding powers - so the degree will be validated by Royal Holloway and Bedford New College, which is part of the University of London.

Pearson wants to provide a degree course which will teach practical, hands-on business skills.

 

"We have a network of blue-chip industry relationships, many of whom are working with us on the design and delivery of our degree programmes," said the college's managing director Roxanne Stockwell.

 

"This gives us an inherent understanding of the modern business environment and employer needs."

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What Higher Education Will Look Like In 2020

What Higher Education Will Look Like In 2020 | Creativity and learning | Scoop.it

Higher education is rapidly changing--you don’t have to even be paying much attention to see that. Universities have started streaming lectures en masse, schools like Harvard and MIT are teaming up to create content tailored for the web, startups like UniversityNow are creating reasonably priced online universities, and startups like Udacity offer online-only classes from renowned professors. None of this existed 10 years ago, and the field isn’t done changing yet. A new report from Pew Internet looks at what higher education will look like in 2020, based on survey responses from over 1,000 "Internet experts, researchers, observers and users."

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Worldplay: One Cure for Imagination Deficit Disorder

Worldplay: One Cure for Imagination Deficit Disorder | Creativity and learning | Scoop.it
Inventing make-believe worlds in childhood cures “imagination deficit disorder.”...

 

Your nine-year-old daughter has invented her own secret country in the intricate patterns of your living room rug. She designs clothes for its inhabitants and creates an imaginary language that she speaks only to them. Your neighbor’s sons, age twelve and ten, spend hours dreaming up the play-by-play of an imaginary baseball league. They draw baseball cards for their imaginary players and keep a daily log of game statistics which no one else is allowed to see. They’ve all been at this for months, lost in their own worlds.

 

Should you worry?Worry only if children can’t distinguish between reality and fantasy: that could be a symptom of mental illness. As long as the distinction is clear, however, they are just having some serious fun. Children who invent make-believe worlds exhibit a strong and healthy imagination – and exercise creative behavior of value to adult professional endeavor.

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Hybridity, pt. 2: What is Hybrid Pedagogy? | Hybridity | HYBRID PEDAGOGY

Hybridity, pt. 2: What is Hybrid Pedagogy? | Hybridity | HYBRID PEDAGOGY | Creativity and learning | Scoop.it
by Jesse Stommel

 

The questions of my pedagogical work are inextricably bound to the questions of my literary scholarship. My hypothesis is that all learning is necessarily hybrid. In classroom-based pedagogy, it is important to engage the digital selves of our students. And, in online pedagogy, it is equally important to engage their physical selves. With digital pedagogy and online education, our challenge is not to merely replace (or offer substitutes for) face-to-face instruction, but to find new and innovative ways to engage students in the practice of learning.

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What If Music and Language Are Neither Instinct nor Invention? | The Crux | Discover Magazine

What If Music and Language Are Neither Instinct nor Invention? | The Crux | Discover Magazine | Creativity and learning | Scoop.it
Earlier this week there was a debate on the origins of music at the Atlantic between two well-known psychologists. Geoffrey Miller (author of The Mating Mind) thinks music is an instinct, one due to sexual selection. On the other side is Gary Marcus (author of Guitar Zero), who believes music is a cultural invention. Given my recent book on the issue, Harnessed, many have asked me where I fall on the question, Is music an instinct or an invention?

 

My answer is that music is neither instinct nor invention—or, from another perspective, music is both—and this debate provides an opportunity to remind ourselves that there is a third option for the origins of music, an option that I have argued may also underlie our writing and language capabilities.

 

Mark Changizi is an evolutionary neurobiologist and director of human cognition at 2AI Labs. He is the author of The Brain from 25000 Feet, The Vision Revolution, and his newest book, Harnessed: How Language and Music Mimicked Nature and Transformed Ape to Man.”

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Despite Less Play, Children’s Use of Imagination Increases over Two Decades | The Creativity Post

Despite Less Play, Children’s Use of Imagination Increases over Two Decades | The Creativity Post | Creativity and learning | Scoop.it
Children today may be busier than ever, but Case Western Reserve University psychologists have found that their imagination hasn’t suffered – in fact, it appears to have increased.

 

Psychologists Jessica Dillon and Sandra Russ expected the opposite outcome when they analyzed 14 play studies that Russ conducted between 1985 and 2008. But as they report in “Changes in Children’s Play Over Two Decades,” an article in the Creativity Research Journal,the data told a story contrary to common assumptions. First, children’s use of imagination in play and their overall comfort and engagement with play activities actually increased over time.

 

In addition, the results suggested that children today expressed less negative feelings in play. Finally, their capacity to express a wide range of positive emotions, to tell stories and to organize thoughts stayed consistent.

 

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Can We Please Move Past Apple’s Silly, Faux-Real UIs?

Can We Please Move Past Apple’s Silly, Faux-Real UIs? | Creativity and learning | Scoop.it
In recent years, the aesthetic of UIs has followed a dominant ideology that attempts to replicate the physical world.

Teague’s Tom Hobbs argues that UI designers need to stop aping real-life bookshelves and suede calendars like Apple does, and go for a new philosophy: Just enough is more.

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Introducing MCAD's MA in Sustainable Design - Educating Global Change Agents - Core77

Introducing MCAD's MA in Sustainable Design - Educating Global Change Agents - Core77 | Creativity and learning | Scoop.it

Minneapolis College of Art and Design (MCAD) is pushing the design envelope with their new Master of Arts in Sustainable Design—an interdisciplinary, studio design-oriented degree that is also offered completely online. The Designers Accord talks to Program Coordinator (and biomimicry education leader) Cindy Gilbert about the inspiration for the program and how MCAD plans to shape the next generation of global creative problem-solvers.

 

 

 At MCAD we have a history of experimenting with online learning, and decided to create this entire program online so we could reach a global audience who could bring diversified perspectives to our classes. Also, this format allowed us to reach the people we wanted to reach most—practicing professionals that would be able to put sustainability concepts, tools, perspectives, etc., into action right away (no matter what their job title) rather than wait until they graduated and could land that "green" job.

 

In addition to the texture our diverse student body brings, online education has the largest margin of growth in higher education (in 2011, 10% compared with 1% overall). This is a sustainable model in education. We leverage the tools that are emergent, freely available, and that will help our students become more impactful leaders. We are consciously leveraging the reality of the way the world works now; adaptation is the key to survival and productivity.

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AT&T’s Largest Donation Ever Creates A National Hub For Learning Through Video Games

AT&T’s Largest Donation Ever Creates A National Hub For Learning Through Video Games | Creativity and learning | Scoop.it
Gamification is a major buzzword in learning.

 

"We decided we were going to aim for exponential change in education," explains Beth Shiroshi, AT&T Foundation’s vice president for sustainability and philanthropy. With this reboot of its Aspire education initiative launched four years ago, AT&T has made a big bet on GameDesk, a nonprofit startup that grew out of the University of Southern California. They’re committing $3.8 million for GameDesk first to build a brick-and-mortar hub in Los Angeles, a "classroom of the future" where new, game-based curricula and processes can be demonstrated, observed, and evaluated. Then the company will broadcast that data through an online educational content portal for parents, students, and educators.

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Sandbox Innovation - DesignTAXI.com

Sandbox Innovation - DesignTAXI.com | Creativity and learning | Scoop.it
Tips For Remarkable Ideas: Sandbox Innovation...

 

At your last brainstorm session, the one in charge probably started with something like this:
“Remember team, there is no such things as a bad idea in brainstorming. And there are no boundaries. Let the sky be the limit!”

 

They were correct.

 

Yet, the process of coming up with ideas to solve, grow, think or create is a process that expands and contracts. This is technically called divergent thinking (move apart) and convergent thinking (come together).


We start with the broad issue that there is a problem or opportunity.


We narrow that down to a laser-focused objective. What we are specifically solving. (This is sometimes called framing).Next, we go broad again—thinking up as many potential ideas as possible—in a world without boundaries.Finally, we go very narrow again—picking the best solutions for our challenge.

Despite ‘broad thinking’ and ‘suspending reality’ during idea generation, we have to re-evaluate those ideas within the walls of real constraints. We always work within boundaries and limits.

 

We have limited time, funding, labor. We are constrained by factory size, operational capacity, product shelf life, legal restrictions and brand guardrails.

 

These are like sandbox walls. The sand allows us to be as creative as we need. The walls define the realistic limits.

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Persistent sensory experience is good for the aging brain: neuroscientists | KurzweilAI

Persistent sensory experience is good for the aging brain: neuroscientists | KurzweilAI | Creativity and learning | Scoop.it

Changes in sensory experience can cause massive rewiring of the brain, even as one ages, according to a study by researchers at the Max Planck Florida Institute.

 

“This study overturns decades-old beliefs that most of the brain is hard-wired before a critical period that ends when one is a young adult,” said MPFI neuroscientist Marcel Oberlaender, PhD, first author on the paper.

 

“By changing the nature of sensory experience, we were able to demonstrate that the brain can rewire, even at an advanced age. This may suggest that if one stops learning and experiencing new things as one ages, a substantial amount of connections within the brain may be lost.”

 

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