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Creativity and learning
A bubble-and-squeak dish of elearning, creativity, innovation and design education
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Online university giant gets bigger

Online university giant gets bigger | Creativity and learning | Scoop.it
Within a year of launching, a US online university network has 2.8 million students and announces a further 29 universities joining as partners.
Clive Hilton's insight:

Why do I feel uncomfortable with the explosive growth of Coursera? Smell the money.

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Open Source Platform Allows Anyone to Create Online Courses

Open Source Platform Allows Anyone to Create Online Courses | Creativity and learning | Scoop.it
Open Source Platform Allows Anyone to Create Online Courses

A new nonprofit project developed by eight Stanford engineers called Class2Gomight have a solution. They let anyone in the world use their open source platform to run their own online course for free.

Like many MOOC's, Class2G0 allows users to learn via videos and interactive quizzes. But because the creators "believe strongly that valuable course content shouldn't be tied to any one platform," the videos are housed on mobile device-friendly YouTube. That ethos of portability is at the heart of their Khan Academy-style practice exercises, too. Instead of the exercises "being trapped in a propriety database," they can be used anywhere, the founders say on their site. The creators simply "don't want to built or maintain more than we have to."

Clive Hilton's insight:

Let battle commence. It would appear that the common denominator in all these online learning delivery paradigms is the desire to eleminate the soggy bit that few seem prepared to admit is what actually makes the difference. So, another pedagogue-free model then.

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Online Universities: Why They Still Don't Measure Up

Online Universities: Why They Still Don't Measure Up | Creativity and learning | Scoop.it
"I hate to sound like a snob, but call me back when Harvard Business School offers an online MBA."

 

Academia is not like the business world, in which an online startup can trounce an established business by building in the cloud and delivering commodity goods with less overhead. Reputation and consistency matter when building trust in hard-to-quantify-results. Ironically, innovation, lower costs, inclusion and reduced barriers to entry can actually hurt the prestige of online schools. One of the key functions of a selective college is to do some pre-sorting of applicants: "if you got into Yale you must be smart." Giant online schools that accept pretty much everyone may be democratizing education, but they're not helping employers or anyone else separate out the best and the brightest.

Clive Hilton's insight:

While the article is overwhelmingly USA focussed, there are salient points in here that are worth reviewing.

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Are MOOCs hyped?

Are MOOCs hyped? | Creativity and learning | Scoop.it

Author: Valerie Strauss

 

If you haven’t heard of MOOCs, you no doubt will, because these Massive Open Online course are becoming all the rage, tagged as the biggest thing in public education since, well, the dawn of public education. (It wasn’t long ago that the Khan Academy was). My colleague Nick Anderson reported about the emergence of the MOOCs movement as a disruptive force in higher education. But there are reasons to think MOOCs are being hyped, and below, former schools superintendent Larry Cuban explains why. Cuban is a former high school social studies teacher (14 years, including seven at Cardozo and Roosevelt high schools in the District), district superintendent (seven years in Arlington, VA) and professor emeritus of education at Stanford University, where he has taught for more than 20 years. His latest book is “As Good As It Gets: What School Reform Brought to Austin.”

 

This appeared on his blog.

 

By Larry Cuban

I have a confession to make. I dropped out of a Massive Open Online course (MOOC) on Artificial Intelligence at Stanford university in the Fall of 2011. There were over 160,000 other students in the class from all over the world. I listened to the two professors on my laptop give mini-lectures, watched fast hands scrawl quickly and cleverly over whiteboards to graphically display the concepts they were teaching. I found the information fascinating. I took a few quizzes. Then I fell behind and realized that I couldn’t keep up, given the other things I was doing so I dropped out. End of story about my first encounter with a MOOC. Turns out, however, that about 138,000 others dropped out also since only 14 percent completed the course and received a certificate.

 

 

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Blended Learning Explained in 33 Slides

The future of higher education is a fusion of online and traditional learning.
Clive Hilton's insight:

Clean and simple slideshare presentation of what differentiates blended learning from the MOOC paradigm. Clue: involvement of pedagogues and  face-to-face contact.

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Would You Pay $100 for a Free Online College Course?

Would You Pay $100 for a Free Online College Course? | Creativity and learning | Scoop.it
In just one year, Coursera has established itself as the giant in the rapidly growing field of online higher education.
Clive Hilton's insight:

Bless 'em. A minor variant on the apochryphal consultant's business model of borrowing your watch and then charging to tell you the time. Venture capitalists aren't moving into Coursera because they believe in free education...

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Online Learning: a Manifesto | Online Learning | HYBRID PEDAGOGY

Online Learning: a Manifesto | Online Learning | HYBRID PEDAGOGY | Creativity and learning | Scoop.it
Online Learning: a Manifesto

December 03, 2012 | Filed in: Online Learning

by Jesse Stommel

 

Online learning is not the whipping boy of higher education. As a classroom teacher first and foremost, I have no interest in proselytizing for online learning, but to roundly condemn it is absurd. Online learning is too big and variable a target. It would be like roundly condemning the internet or all objects made from paper.

 

Much of the rhetoric currently being used against MOOCs is the same rhetoric that has been used against online learning since the 90s (and against distance education since the mid-1800s). There are important questions to be asked, such as how do MOOCs change the business models of higher education, or how do we maintain online the intimate and tailored experiences some of us create in the classroom, but these are not new questions. What I find exciting aboutthe rise of the MOOC is that it brings with it a new level of investment in discussions of online learning. This isn't to say that MOOCs are necessarily good or bad (they are, in fact, a lot of different things, depending on the MOOC), but to get lost entirely in the stories being told about MOOCs is to miss the forest for the trees, so to speak.

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Coursera starts process of taking control of and monetising formerly free MOOC. Here we go...

Coursera starts process of taking control of and monetising formerly free MOOC. Here we go... | Creativity and learning | Scoop.it
This morning, Coursera, the "massively open online course" or MOOC platform founded by two Stanford professors, announced that they’d be partnering with ACE, the American Council on Education, to offer a path to college credit for select...

 

Starting early next year, anyone who successfully completes one of the selected Coursera courses will have the chance to take a proctored exam over the web from ACE, pay a small fee, and earn credit that could be accepted at up to 2,000 universities nationwide.The move comes in the midst of a struggle in the ed-tech movement over business models and openness. The issue is this: beginning with MIT’s Open CourseWare in 2001, the world’s greatest public and nonprofit universities started offering access to some of their professors’ lectures, notes, and other materials online for free. The stuff was under Creative Commons license, meaning anyone could use it or re-use it as they saw fit; but the material--45-minute, amateur-recorded lectures, years-old problem sets--often just sat there, as hard to find and underutilized as books moldering in the library stacks. That changed last January when Stanford’s open online AI course, based on short, snappy videos and quizzes, went viral, with over 200,000 signups. Enter the venture capitalists. That same educational material, funded by taxpayer money and private philanthropy, that used to be available to anyone for free is now being served on a platform that makes it easier to use, but places restrictions on its reuse and may have fees associated with it in the future. Now MOOCs may be very, very popular, but they’re not really open anymore.

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Paul Gagnon's comment, November 15, 2012 6:14 PM
Why am I not surprised...Horseshara...
Peter B. Sloep's comment, November 15, 2012 6:37 PM
No, the money has got to come from somewhere. Particularly if you have venture capitalists breathing in your neck. Still, read yesterday's MOOC pedagogy and accreditation by Terry Anderson. We should not become complacent and just think that it will blow over, it won't.