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Creativity and learning
A bubble-and-squeak dish of elearning, creativity, innovation and design education
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CityHome

CityHome | Creativity and learning | Scoop.it
The Changing Places MIT Media Lab research group explores how new strategies for architectural design, mobility systems, and networked intelligence can make possible dynamic, evolving places that respond to the complexities of life.

 

We demonstrate how the CityHome, which has a very small footprint (840 square feet), can function as an apartment two to three times that size. This is achieved through a transformable wall system which integrates furniture, storage, exercise equipment, lighting, office equipment, and entertainment systems. One potential scenario for the CityHome is where the bedroom transforms to a home gym, the living room to a dinner party space for 14 people, a suite for four guests, two separate office spaces plus a meeting space, or an a open loft space for a large party. Finally, the kitchen can either be open to the living space, or closed off to be used as a catering kitchen. Each occupant engages in a process to personalize the precise design of the wall units according to his or her unique activities and requirements.

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The Kit-ifying Education of Superstorm Sandy | Wired Opinion | Wired.com

The Kit-ifying Education of Superstorm Sandy | Wired Opinion | Wired.com | Creativity and learning | Scoop.it
The storm slammed those of us living on the East Coast with a simple truth: Nature is more powerful than people, and technology is no match.

 

Manhattan-based littleBits, which makes an open source library of electronic modules that snap together with tiny magnets, hosted a workshop asking “Why Did The Lights Go Out?” The goal was simple: Engage kids in play-and-prototyping to help them answer the question.

 

The idea was to help the kids – who had all experienced to various degrees the what of Sandy – to understand the why and the how of the events. Oh, and to get them familiar with littleBits’ product while they were at it. An opportunistic move, certainly, but a pretty ingenious one: get kids to use kits to learn through play. As MIT’s Michael Schrage noted in an essay on kit culture in Make magazine, “talented amateurs don’t just build kits; kits help build talented amateurs.”

 

In this case, the talented amateurs ranged between five and ten years old. After all, it’s never too early to start.

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Harvard and MIT Create EdX to Offer Free Online Courses Worldwide

Harvard and MIT Create EdX to Offer Free Online Courses Worldwide | Creativity and learning | Scoop.it
MIT has teamed up with its Cambridge neighbor, Harvard, to create a new non profit venture, EDX. To date, Harvard has barely dabbled in open education. But it’s now throwing $30 million behind EDX (M.I.T. will do the same), and together they will offer free digital courses worldwide, with students receiving the obligatory certificate of mastery at the end. The EDX platform will be open source, meaning it will be open to other universities..

 

Classes will begin next fall.

 

 

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Disruptive innovation — in education | KurzweilAI

Disruptive innovation — in education | KurzweilAI | Creativity and learning | Scoop.it
For Anant Agarwal, MITx, the Institute’s new online-learning initiative, isn’t just a means of democratizing education.

 

A decade ago, MIT broke ground with its OpenCourseWare initiative, which made MIT course materials, such as syllabi and lecture notes, publicly accessible. But over the last five years, MIT Provost L. Rafael Reif has led an effort to move the complete MIT classroom experience online, with video lectures, homework assignments, lab work — and a grade at the end.

 

The development of such online-learning tools will be crucial to MITx’s expansion. “How do you put a chemistry lab online?” Agarwal asks. “We’re just getting started here. Figuring out how to tailor the platform for MIT’s many disciplines will require collaboration across all our schools.”

MITx is not just a tool for democratizing education; it’s also a tool for education research. “I want to disrupt how education is done,” Agarwal says — not just online but on campus as well.

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Collective Intelligence | Conversation | Edge

Collective Intelligence | Conversation | Edge | Creativity and learning | Scoop.it

As all the people and computers on our planet get more and more closely connected, it's becoming increasingly useful to think of all the people and computers on the planet as a kind of global brain.

 

THOMAS W. MALONE is the Patrick J. McGovern Professor of Management at the MIT Sloan School of Management and the founding director of the MIT Center for Collective Intelligence.

 

He was also the founding director of the MIT Center for Coordination Science and one of the two founding co-directors of the MIT Initiative on "Inventing the Organizations of the 21st Century".

 

It's important to realize that intelligence is not just something that happens inside individual brains. It also arises with groups of individuals. In fact, I'd define collective intelligence as groups of individuals acting collectively in ways that seem intelligent. By that definition, of course, collective intelligence has been around for a very long time. Families, companies, countries, and armies: those are all examples of groups of people working together in ways that at least sometimes seem intelligent.

 

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What My 11 Year Old's Stanford Course Taught Me About Online Education - Forbes

What My 11 Year Old's Stanford Course Taught Me About Online Education - Forbes | Creativity and learning | Scoop.it
My 11 year old son just took a course at Stanford. That has a nice ring to it but it is actually meaningless because these days anyone can take a course at Stanford. You don’t even have to pay.

 

That doesn’t make for an interesting post except that this ‘bunch of videos’ is currently being heralded as the future of higher education. In the New York Times, David Brooks saw courses like the one my son took as a tsunami about to hit campuses all over the world. And he isn’t alone. Harvard’s Clay Christensen sees it as a transformative technology that will change education forever. And along with Stanford many other institutions, most notably Harvard and MIT, are leaping into the online mix. This is attracting attention and investment dollars. It has people nervous and excited.

 

So I wondered, what happens when someone who has grown up online encountered one of these new ventures?

 

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Granny army teaches in the cloud

Granny army teaches in the cloud | Creativity and learning | Scoop.it

How Skype is connecting UK grannies with children thousands of miles away in India.No-one does love and encouragement better than a granny. Now that love is being spread across continents, as UK-based grandmothers extend their embrace to school children thousands of miles away in India.

 

Jackie Barrow isn't a granny yet but as a retired teacher she felt she might qualify for an advert in The Guardian newspaper calling for volunteers to help teach children in India.

 

She did and today, three years on, she is reading "Not Now Bernard" via Skype to a small group of children in the Indian city of Pune.

 

They love it and are engaged in the experience as she holds up an Easter egg to show them how children in the UK celebrated the recent holiday.

Advice and praiseThe Granny Cloud project is the brainchild of Prof Sugata Mitra, best-known for his hole-in-the-wall computer scheme which put basic PCs into some of the poorest parts of India.

 

The work is being supported by the School of Education, Communication and Language Sciences at Newcastle University, and MIT's iLab project.

 

 

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Forecast 2020: Web 3.0+ and Collective Intelligence

Forecast 2020: Web 3.0+ and Collective Intelligence | Creativity and learning | Scoop.it

Brief but thought provoking article, including ideas about 'future universities'... "Let's focus on the resulting element - the "collective intelligence". Think about it as billions of human brains working using future super computers as a platform. Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) professor Srini Devadas described "collective intelligence" as consisting of two pillars: cloud computing and crowd computing. Cloud computing is using the Internet as a platform and making access to information available to everyone. Crowd computing, according to him, involves the analysis of information into "collective intelligence"; far beyond what we have today."


Via Howard Rheingold, grainnehamilton, Pippa Davies @PippaDavies
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