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Creativity and learning
A bubble-and-squeak dish of elearning, creativity, innovation and design education
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What My 11 Year Old's Stanford Course Taught Me About Online Education - Forbes

What My 11 Year Old's Stanford Course Taught Me About Online Education - Forbes | Creativity and learning | Scoop.it
My 11 year old son just took a course at Stanford. That has a nice ring to it but it is actually meaningless because these days anyone can take a course at Stanford. You don’t even have to pay.

 

That doesn’t make for an interesting post except that this ‘bunch of videos’ is currently being heralded as the future of higher education. In the New York Times, David Brooks saw courses like the one my son took as a tsunami about to hit campuses all over the world. And he isn’t alone. Harvard’s Clay Christensen sees it as a transformative technology that will change education forever. And along with Stanford many other institutions, most notably Harvard and MIT, are leaping into the online mix. This is attracting attention and investment dollars. It has people nervous and excited.

 

So I wondered, what happens when someone who has grown up online encountered one of these new ventures?

 

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Harvard Referencing Generator

Harvard Referencing Generator | Creativity and learning | Scoop.it
Harvard Generator is a free tool that allows you to quickly and easily format references and sources in the correct Harvard Referencing Format...
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Don't Think Different, Think About Different Things

Don't Think Different, Think About Different Things | Creativity and learning | Scoop.it
This post is about innovation. But before we get started, imagine the produce area in your local supermarket. Were you able to do it? That seems like a strange question to ask. Of course you could.

Via axelletess
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Harvard and MIT Create EdX to Offer Free Online Courses Worldwide

Harvard and MIT Create EdX to Offer Free Online Courses Worldwide | Creativity and learning | Scoop.it
MIT has teamed up with its Cambridge neighbor, Harvard, to create a new non profit venture, EDX. To date, Harvard has barely dabbled in open education. But it’s now throwing $30 million behind EDX (M.I.T. will do the same), and together they will offer free digital courses worldwide, with students receiving the obligatory certificate of mastery at the end. The EDX platform will be open source, meaning it will be open to other universities..

 

Classes will begin next fall.

 

 

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Don’t Lecture Me: Rethinking How College Students Learn | MindShift

Don’t Lecture Me: Rethinking How College Students Learn | MindShift | Creativity and learning | Scoop.it

It may seem obvious that lecturing isn’t the best method to get students thinking and learning. Project-based learning and other interactive approaches have been popular in elementary and secondary schools for a long time, and of course the discussion-based seminar is an age-old approach. But lecturing is still the dominant teaching method in large classes at the college level, and also at many high schools – especially in the sciences. Experts say different approaches to teaching large classes can help more students learn, and help them learn better.

“We want to have a class where everyone can be successful because we need everyone to be successful,” says Brian Lukoff, an education researcher at Harvard who is studying ways to more effectively teach large classes.

“We need to educate a population to compete in this global marketplace,” says Lukoff. We can’t do that by relying on a few motivated people to teach themselves. “We need a much larger swath of [the] population to be able to think critically and problem-solve.”


Via Claire Brooks, Not a waste of Space
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