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Healing through the Arts
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Healing Depression Through the Expressive Arts

Healing Depression Through the Expressive Arts | Creatively Aging | Scoop.it
Coping with depression can be painful and difficult. A great way to help heal depression is through expressive arts.
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How To Ask [for stories]--And Listen [to stories]--Like You Mean It

How To Ask [for stories]--And Listen [to stories]--Like You Mean It | Creatively Aging | Scoop.it

Questions are the expressive, probing language for growing others; listening is the receptive, facilitating language for growing others. These two complementary approaches form a continuous growth conversation loop.

 

Leaders who are helping others to grow and innovate are always trying to craft the best questions to make a difference. Here's how to ask the questions that will propel your team and your organization forward.

 

Listening -- I mean listening really well -- is sometimes hard to do. Here's a great article by Kevin Cashman, author of The Pause Principle, reminding us that the more deeply and authentically we can listen to another, the deeper our questions go, and the deeper our understanding becomes.

 

Listening deeply is the first storytelling skill to build -- so you know which story to share or ask for. And then so you can dig more deeply into the story to understand what it really means.

 

For leaders, this is essential. For anyone wanting to master business storytelling, it is critical. Many marketing and branding folks have still not caught on to listening as being a vital component when using stories.

 

Sooooo -- here's a reminder that also contains some great insights, a list of what not to do, and a nice section on the power of authentic questions.

 

Now I'll go on a hunt and see if I can find an article for you just on the Art of the Question. For as they say in Appreciative Inquiry, the question is the intervention -- so knowing how to craft and ask the question is key.

 

In the meantime, enjoy this article.

 

This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it ;


Via Karen Dietz, Luciana Viter
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History of Qigong: The 18 Luohan Hands | Flowing Zen - Gainesville ...

History of Qigong: The 18 Luohan Hands | Flowing Zen - Gainesville ... | Creatively Aging | Scoop.it
Enlightened Healing through Tai Chi and Qigong. My Book is ... (As an aside, I feel that my teacher did something similar by not only writing his books in English, but by translating these arts into Western culture.) The word ...
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Our Storytelling Minds: Do We Ever Really Know What’s Going on Inside?

Our Storytelling Minds: Do We Ever Really Know What’s Going on Inside? | Creatively Aging | Scoop.it
We formulate stories about our own behavior and that of others all the time. If we’re not sure about the details, we make them up – or rather, our brain does, without so much as thinking about asking our permission.

Via Douglas Eby
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Getting More Life From Mindful Creating - The Creative Mind

Getting More Life From Mindful Creating - The Creative Mind | Creatively Aging | Scoop.it

Psychologist Ellen Langer writes that pursuing creative expression may hold the key to finding meaning and fulfillment in the rest of our lives.

She notes some of what holds people back is fear: “As much as we’d love to play the recorder or write poetry, it’s easier and safer to put it off because we are afraid of making fools of ourselves. Of course, we know we shouldn’t worry about what other people think, but we do.

“Or when we actually give writing or drawing a try, the trying turns out to be more terrifying still, and we too quickly put our creative activity aside. Something interferes with just enjoying painting or playing an instrument for the pleasure it brings us.”


Via Douglas Eby
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Creative thinking - creative mindfulness

Creative thinking - creative mindfulness | Creatively Aging | Scoop.it
Eric Maisel says the goal of creative mindfulness is nonjudgmental observation and thinking that leads to authenticity, creativity, and mental health.

"Creative mindfulness requires that you vanish, your mind hushed, so that your creative thoughts can appear. Open to an ever-deepening silence that is pregnant with your coming creative work."


Via Douglas Eby
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'Mindfulness' exercises help curb stress and fatigue associated with arthritis

'Mindfulness' exercises help curb stress and fatigue associated with arthritis | Creatively Aging | Scoop.it
'Mindfulness' exercises, which focus on experiencing the present moment, no matter how difficult, can help curb the stress and fatigue associated with painful rheumatoid joint disease, indicates a small study published online in the Annals of...

Via Sakis Koukouvis
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Study: Empathy and Self-Recognition in Phylogenetic and Ontogenetic Perspective

Study: Empathy and Self-Recognition in Phylogenetic and Ontogenetic Perspective | Creatively Aging | Scoop.it

Empathy means understanding another person’s emotional or intentional state by vicariously sharing this state. As opposed to emotional contagion, empathy is characterized by the self–other distinction of subjective experience. Empathy develops in the second year, as soon as symbolic representation and mental imagery set in that enable children to represent the self, to recognize their mirror image, and to identify with another person.

 

In experiments with 126 children, mirror recognition and readiness to empathize with a distressed playmate were investigated. Almost all recognizers showed compassion and tried to help, whereas nonrecognizers were perplexed or remained indifferent. Several motivational consequences of empathy are discussed and its special quality is outlined in comparison with theory of mind and perspective taking.


Via Edwin Rutsch
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Kim Manley Ort | Books | The Creative Habit

Kim Manley Ort | Books | The Creative Habit | Creatively Aging | Scoop.it
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Wendy Wasserstein, Pulitzer Prize-winning Playwright * Yale Center For Dyslexia & Creativity

Wendy Wasserstein, Pulitzer Prize-winning Playwright * Yale Center For Dyslexia & Creativity | Creatively Aging | Scoop.it
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9 Ways That Humor Can Heal | World of Psychology

9 Ways That Humor Can Heal | World of Psychology | Creatively Aging | Scoop.it
I'd add that human beings can heal (at least partially!) ... I suppose that's why some of the funniest people out there–Stephen Colbert, Robin Williams, Ben Stiller, Art Buchwald — have journeyed through periods of torment.
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Why We Keep Getting the Same Old Ideas

Why We Keep Getting the Same Old Ideas | Creatively Aging | Scoop.it

"Aoccdrnig to a rscheearch at Cmabridge Uinvervtisy, it deosnt mttaer in waht oredr the litteers in a wrod are, the olny iprmoetnt tihng is taht the frist and lsat ltteer be at the rghit pclae. The rset can be a ttoal mses and you can sitll raed it wouthit a porbelm. Tihs is besauae ocne we laren how to raed we bgien to aargnre the lteerts in our mnid to see waht we epxcet tp see. The huamn mnid deos not raed ervey lteter by istlef, but the wrod as a wlohe. We do tihs ucnsolniuscoy. (....)


"When information enters the mind, it self-organizes into patterns and ruts much like the hot water on butter. New information automatically flows into the preformed grooves. After a while, the channels become so deep it takes only a bit of information to activate an entire channel. This is the pattern recognition and pattern completion process of the brain. Even if much of the information is out of the channel, the pattern will be activated. The mind automatically corrects and completes the information to select and activate a pattern.This is why you can read the jumbled letters above as words.

 

This is also why when we sit down and try to will new ideas or solutions; we tend to keep coming up with the same-old, same-old ideas. Information is flowing down the same ruts and grooves making the same-old connections producing the same old ideas over and over again. Even tiny bits of information are enough to activate the same patterns over and over again. (...)

 

How then can we change our thinking patterns? Think again about the dish of butter with all the preformed channels. Creativity occurs when we tilt the dish in a different direction and force the water (information) to create new channels and make new connections with other channels. These new connections give you different ways to focus your attention and different ways to interpret whatever you are focusing on. Nature gets variation with genetic mutations. Creative thinkers get variation by conceptually combining dissimilar subjects which changes our thinking patterns and provides us with a variety of alternatives and conjectures. (...)"


Via Amira, Samuel H. Kenyon, Wildcat2030, Viktor Markowski, Pepe Crespo
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dephunked's comment, September 26, 2012 9:47 AM
Wlidcat,

...I´ve thought about how creative thinkers have been discriminated throughout modern civilization...

...as novelty naturally falls outside the norm, and modern civilization has been inherently, systematically norm-biased, I have this feeling that non-successful creatives have been subjected to significant social and systematic discrimination...

...top down bureaucratic organization shaped the social norm to disclude creativity, novelty thinking, and social evolution, the majority of those innately prone to innovation could count on little help and reward from the norm-biased surroundings... their life was a life of struggle...

...It´s unnatural for a creative neurotype to conform to the norm, the evolutionary origin and purpose of creativity is cultural evolution. Creativity evolves the norm, it cannot fit into it, and within the creative thinkers, the creative drive is stronger then the drive to conform...

...during my brief medical practice amongst those at the bottom of civilization, the homeless, I saw so much misunderstood potential, so much creativity and ingenuity and empathy, and so little recognition from their "society". Systematically discouraged and misunderstood, forced into poverty and stigma-generated alienation...

...in every one of them, I saw myself...


These social patterns are typical for many shortcomings of top-down bureaucracy, but I have a feeling that creative thinkers in particular have suffered from the hegemonic-ish norm. I haven´t found much literature about it, and I believe it´s important for society to acknowledge this, just as important as the pride movement to end and avow the discrimination of homosexuality. Important at least, as a reminder of the darker angels of our past.

...what do you think?
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San Francisco Sentinel » Blog Archives » MAYA LIN – Artist Debuts “What Is Missing?” At CA Academy of Sciences

San Francisco Sentinel » Blog Archives » MAYA LIN – Artist Debuts “What Is Missing?” At CA Academy of Sciences | Creatively Aging | Scoop.it
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Art by Karena: A Conversation with the Internationally Acclaimed ...

Art by Karena: A Conversation with the Internationally Acclaimed ... | Creatively Aging | Scoop.it
Excellent advice, Steven. I believe one of the most difficult challenges for an artist can be finding their own voice to translate to the canvas, through the lens, etc. Steven, Thank you so much for participating in The 2012 Artists ...
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61 Amazing Manhole Covers from Japan

61 Amazing Manhole Covers from Japan | Creatively Aging | Scoop.it

Manhole covers are a ubitquitous part of the urban fabric, and they are typically drab and purely utilitarian.  In Japan, municipalities take pride in the this ordinary piece of the landscape and convert them into extraordinary works of art that reflect the local people, place and culture. 

 

Tags: book review, landscape, art, urban, culture, place.

 


Via Seth Dixon
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Lauren Stahowiak's curator insight, April 14, 6:00 PM

This is a great take on art and the ways of celebrating Japan with touches of personal findings and ideas. These manhole covers are cheery and reflect a piece of Japan that not only tell stories, but embrace history.

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How To Live A Creative Life [Infographic]

How To Live A Creative Life [Infographic] | Creatively Aging | Scoop.it
Learn how to live a creative life with this cheeky infographic from Fast Company. What daily habits do you have which allow you to express your creativity?

Via Creativity For Life
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Zadie Smith’s 10 Rules of Writing

Zadie Smith’s 10 Rules of Writing | Creatively Aging | Scoop.it

When still a child, make sure you read a lot of books. Spend more time doing this than anything else.

 

When an adult, try to read your own work as a stranger would read it, or even better, as an enemy would.

 

Don’t romanticise your ‘vocation’. You can either write good sentences or you can’t. There is no ‘writer’s lifestyle’. All that matters is what you leave on the page. ...

~~

List of her books:  http://vsb.li/Mj786v


Via Douglas Eby
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“Art Saved My Life” - The Creative Mind

“Art Saved My Life” - The Creative Mind | Creatively Aging | Scoop.it

Creative expression can transform our painful reactions to traumas, providing renewed strength of our identity and a way to give voice to difficult feelings.

 

Charlize Theron as a teen saw her mother shoot her father in self defense. She said in a 2004 interview that her work has helped her deal with it: “I think acting has healed me. I get to let it out. I get to say it and feel it in my work and I think that’s why I don’t go through my life walking with this thing, and suffering.”


Via Douglas Eby
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Dr. James R. Doty On His Morning Mindfulness Practice (WATCH)

Dr. James R. Doty On His Morning Mindfulness Practice (WATCH) | Creatively Aging | Scoop.it

Dr. James R. Doty, Clinical Professor of Neurosurgery at Stanford University and HuffPost blogger, shares a morning mindfulness practice he does to be a more compassionate person. Every morning, he says, he goes through the acronym 'CDEFGHIJKL' to remind himself to be mindful. Watch the video above to find out what each letter stands for and how the practice helps him find compassion.


Via Edwin Rutsch
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100 images for visual brainstorming

100 images that can inspire you when you are brainstorming about new products or services.

Via Ana Cristina Pratas
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Javier Arana's curator insight, April 4, 2013 9:26 AM

Todo un arte.

Javier Arana's curator insight, April 4, 2013 9:28 AM

El arte de ser creativo.

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Street View goes underwater | Google Earth Blog

Street View goes underwater | Google Earth Blog | Creatively Aging | Scoop.it
Amazing things about Google Earth - news, features, tips, technology, and applications...
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creativity musetindex

creativity musetindex | Creatively Aging | Scoop.it

Caring for your inner muse

Dr. Leslie Wilson

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Dana Foundation Blog: Can the Arts Contribute to Healthier Aging?

The National Academies of Sciences collaborated with several national organizations to host a workshop on the arts and aging.
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Breathe Deeply to Activate Vagus Nerve - Travel and Health

Breathe Deeply to Activate Vagus Nerve - Travel and Health | Creatively Aging | Scoop.it

Doing abdominal breathing, you can activate vagus nerve and trigger a relaxation response. The relaxation response, which is the opposite of the stress response, is necessary for your body to heal, repair, and renew.


Via Pamela Day
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"What is Missing?" exhibit by Maya Lin

Vietnam Memorial creator Maya Lin unveils her final public memorial "What is Missing?" at the California Academy of Sciences.
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