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Healing through the Arts
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Humour in the steppes of Mongolia

Humour in the steppes of Mongolia | Creatively Aging | Scoop.it
I can´t stop smiling from a photo I stumbled upon on the facebook page of Nomaden (a Norwegian travel store) – I just love it! I tried to find the source of the photo, but no luck. I found it sprea...

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, February 18, 2013 12:39 PM

I think this is my new litmus test for potential friends.  If this picture from Mongolia doesn't bring a smile to your face, I just don't think that we can be friends.  If anyone can find the original source (or a hi-res version), I'd love to hear about it.  

chris tobin's comment, February 21, 2013 1:33 PM
Great happy photo. This is a possible National Geographgic photo
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82 iconic world landmarks to visit

82 iconic world landmarks to visit | Creatively Aging | Scoop.it
Some buildings and features are so well known they have become icons of place.

 

This is a great collection of important world landmarks including the pictured Potala Palace in the Tibetan city of Lhasa.  Who wouldn't like to see some of these places?   

 

Tags: geo-inspiration, tourism, images.


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Sophia Schroeder's comment, September 1, 2013 8:02 PM
All of these landmarks are beautiful. It's very interesting to see how much culture, especially religion, has shaped these "must see places." Also, I felt like I was traveling through time and got to examine the feats of new architectural eras, though some would debate that architectural works from the past are more outstanding strictly by the means in which they built these masterpieces. It needs to be said (to add to the wonderment of these places) that most of these monuments are built in places where the overall economic status is low; to see things like temples and churches of such great magnitude and beauty built with such craftsmanship, dedication, and money (even though it is scarce) shows how much they rely on their faith. I was also disappointed to see that the two monuments displayed for America, the Lincoln Memorial and the St. Louis Arch, were, in my opinion, not the best picks. Compared to the other landmarks ours feel so mundane, so void of history and culture (maybe, that's because I have grown up seeing them all my life and their meaning and awe has deteriorated to me.) I guess this can be attributed, in part, to the fact that our country is newer and has not yet grown enough to have the rich history including the trials and tribulations in which other countries have had which makes their culture more fascinating and intriguing to me.
Mary Rack's comment, September 2, 2013 12:49 AM
Sophia, Thanks for your very fine comment! I agree with you entirely, and especially about the Lincoln Memorial and St Louis Arch. Better choices might be the Grand Canyon, the Giant Sequoia trees in California, the National Cathedral in DC, or even Mt Rushmore? And some of the ancient cliff dwellings in the Southwest are amazing. Too bad they did not consult us.
Mary Rack's comment, September 2, 2013 12:51 AM
PS ... or the Hoover Dam?
Rescooped by Claudia M. Reder from Geography Education
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Earthscapes

Earthscapes | Creatively Aging | Scoop.it
The U.S. Postal Service celebrates the beauty and diversity of America's landscapes as seen from above with the Earthscapes (Forever®) stamps.Offering an opportunity to see the world in a new way, the 15 stamps are issued in 3 rows of 5, showing 3...

 

These stamps are the perfect way to decorate your letters while showing your love for the Earth and geography. 

 

Tags: images, art, landscape. 


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NatGeo on Instagram

NatGeo on Instagram | Creatively Aging | Scoop.it

I'm not a photographer, so Instagram isn't one on of my preferred social media platforms.  However, since National Geographic is world renowned for their images, this is a perfect outlet to share more images that wouldn't fit into their articles or other collections.  According to their Social Media expert, this foggy image of NYC is their most viewed image on Instagram. 


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Ingrid Dabringer’s Map Paintings: Finding Whimsy in Geography

Ingrid Dabringer’s Map Paintings: Finding Whimsy in Geography | Creatively Aging | Scoop.it

This is a great gallery of clever artwork that puts the "art" in cartography (The Earth without art is just "eh"). 


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Iceland's Volcanic Rivers

Iceland's Volcanic Rivers | Creatively Aging | Scoop.it
Time and time again, we're reminded of nature's beauty. It's hard to believe, but these photos of real landscapes, not abstract paintings.

 

Andre Ermolaev, through his photography has captured the beauty of Iceland's geomorphology.  Being on the Mid-Atlantic Ridge, Iceland has abundant volcanic ash which adds rich color to the fluvial systems.  

 

Tags: geomorphology, physical, Europe, fluvial, water, landforms, images.


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Cam E's curator insight, February 27, 2014 11:20 AM

Iceland is one of my favorite countries, and the place I most want to visit and would most likely move to if I had to leave the United States. The landscape is insanely beautiful and the population is extremely small, something I enjoy as I dislike cities and a high population density. Even the capital of Iceland looks akin to a relatively average fishing town in the Northern US or Canada, and the entire country has less people in it than any given state in the US.

Wilmine Merlain's curator insight, December 18, 2014 2:57 PM

Nature has an incredible way at depicting and displaying its true beauty to the rest of the world. These images captured by photographer Andre Ermolaev looks like something that would be captured at a museum opening displaying some remarkable pieces of abstract work. Though this may not be the case, it gives you the desire to want to travel and experience this for yourself.

Keone Sinnott-Suardana's curator insight, June 22, 9:39 PM