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Rescooped by Claudia M. Reder from Geography Education
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The Conflict Zone

The Conflict Zone | Creatively Aging | Scoop.it

"In a new series of four eight-minute videos, National Geographic Emerging Explorer Aziz Abu Sarah is a cultural educator working to build relationships between Israelis and Palestinians in Jerusalem and throughout Israel. In this series of four eight-minute videos, Abu Sarah meets with people from both sides of the conflict in order to better understand and communicate how this international dispute impacts their everyday lives."


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Rescooped by Claudia M. Reder from Geography Education
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Chinese passport map causes diplomatic dispute

Chinese passport map causes diplomatic dispute | Creatively Aging | Scoop.it
Experts warn that China's apparent claims to other territories could have a long-term impact on relations with its neighbours...

 

Many people assume oftentimes that a map merely reflects reality.  In this passport map, China is flexing it's regional muscles, trying to reinforce their territorial claims as legitimate.  Not surprisingly, their neighbors with competing claims are angered, calling this map dimplomatically "unacceptable."  Some look at this map and dismiss it as a glorified watermark.  What you you think the sub-text this maps is?  You can find another article on this topic in the Washington Post. 

 

Tags: cartography, China, borders.


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James Hobson's curator insight, November 21, 2014 7:20 PM

(East Asia topic 3)

This is a prime example of how all maps have a specific purpose for their making. Since all maps are in some form influenced by humans, no map can therefore be purely objective.

What if China's passport map was one of the entire world? It may be a pleasing idea for nationalist supporters, but it doesn't necessarily mean it's accepted as true. The bottom line is that it's not the ink-on-paper picture itself causing the upset as much as it is the somewhat-disguised message being sent through it.

Samuel D'Amore's curator insight, December 17, 2014 5:49 PM

While the inclusion of these islands in their passports might seem like a rather minor thing for the Chinese to have done in fact it carries far greater ramifications. By doing so the Chinese government is sending the message that in considered these areas to be part of China and this might cause tensions with the actual owners. For centuries China avoided colonization and expansion but now it seems they are tempting to make up for lost time in their aggressive claims on land and water. Hopefully this wont lead to any military conflicts in the future. 

Martin Kemp's curator insight, December 17, 2015 3:40 PM

now this is really interesting to see how china issues passports for disputed territories which they claim to be theirs, i can definitely see why places would be upset about this and how this map can be seen as incorrect.

Rescooped by Claudia M. Reder from Geography Education
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Border Walls

Border Walls | Creatively Aging | Scoop.it

"Geographer Reece Jones discusses his recent book Border Walls, examining the history of how and why societies have chosen to literally wall themselves apart.  He gives a brief history of political maps, how international lines reshape landscapes, and how the trend towards increased border wall construction contrasts with the view of a “borderless” world under globalization."


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Donald Dane's comment, December 10, 2013 9:00 AM
listening to some of the podcast you can get an in-depth synopsis of this. the walls that divide our countries and even towns over time have all the criteria and/or reasoning. Great Wall of China to keep invaders from starting war, Berlin Wall to divide german supporters of war, America/Mexican boarder is to keep illegal immigrants from coming, fence in your moms backyard is to keep neighbors/animals out of yard. Walls all have the same concept of avoiding war, trespassers and privacy. this is seen in not only everyday living but in military use as well.
Amanda Morgan's comment, September 13, 2014 4:49 PM
I found this podcast to be interesting because it seems as though the more popular globalization is becoming, and the more it grows, there are more borders and walls being built. By secluding the poor communities, wealthier communities could essentially cut them off to the rest of the globe.
Amanda Morgan's curator insight, September 18, 2014 10:52 AM

I found this podcast to be interesting because it seems as though the more popular globalization is becoming, and the more it grows, there are more borders and walls being built. By secluding the poor communities, wealthier communities could essentially cut them off to the rest of the globe.