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Healing through the Arts
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Narrativs

Narrativs | Creatively Aging | Scoop.it
Stories that move us

Description by New Learning Times

 

"Everyone has a Story to Tell
Do you have a story you would like to share? Do you enjoy reading short stories?Narrativs believes that everyone has a story to tell and aims to connect people all over the world through storytelling. Narrativs has created a digital space where aspiring writers can gain support for their work and receive constructive criticism. On the Narrativs website everyone is invited to submit a poem or short story – fiction or non-fiction. The Narrativs editing team provides feedback on the submission and the author is encouraged to make the necessary changes. After the piece goes through the editing process the story is then published on the Narrativs site and readers can rate and write comments in reaction to the story. This new publishing format allows one to learn about the world from many different perspectives by reading this diverse collection of stories.

 

"Social Entrepreneurship 
Narrativs aims to give everyone a voice, not only by creating a platform for writers to share their work, but also by financially supporting non- profit projects that promote literacy. Founder, Rachel Ngoc Anh Bui was inspired to develop Narrativs after listening to a global responsibility-focused speech by the prince of Norway. Narrativs plans to gather the best stories from the site to publish in a book. The money that the book generates will be given to groups that aid education in developing countries. The Narrativs team hopes to inspire others to find ways to develop businesses that make the world a better place. The team has been visiting schools in the United States and motivating students to create businesses that are socially responsible. Narrativs is creating a valuable narrative around both digital authorship and global citizenship."

 


Via Jim Lerman
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Margaret Waage's comment, August 31, 2013 1:58 PM
I love this idea because it is true. What I love even more is the idea of sharing narratives because that experience is what connects us to each other.
mtmeme's curator insight, August 31, 2013 3:01 PM

Interesting type of support!

harish magan's comment, September 3, 2013 8:16 AM
It is indeed very powerful and wish to study deep on the subject.
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How To Ask [for stories]--And Listen [to stories]--Like You Mean It

How To Ask [for stories]--And Listen [to stories]--Like You Mean It | Creatively Aging | Scoop.it

Questions are the expressive, probing language for growing others; listening is the receptive, facilitating language for growing others. These two complementary approaches form a continuous growth conversation loop.

 

Leaders who are helping others to grow and innovate are always trying to craft the best questions to make a difference. Here's how to ask the questions that will propel your team and your organization forward.

 

Listening -- I mean listening really well -- is sometimes hard to do. Here's a great article by Kevin Cashman, author of The Pause Principle, reminding us that the more deeply and authentically we can listen to another, the deeper our questions go, and the deeper our understanding becomes.

 

Listening deeply is the first storytelling skill to build -- so you know which story to share or ask for. And then so you can dig more deeply into the story to understand what it really means.

 

For leaders, this is essential. For anyone wanting to master business storytelling, it is critical. Many marketing and branding folks have still not caught on to listening as being a vital component when using stories.

 

Sooooo -- here's a reminder that also contains some great insights, a list of what not to do, and a nice section on the power of authentic questions.

 

Now I'll go on a hunt and see if I can find an article for you just on the Art of the Question. For as they say in Appreciative Inquiry, the question is the intervention -- so knowing how to craft and ask the question is key.

 

In the meantime, enjoy this article.

 

This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it ;


Via Karen Dietz, Luciana Viter
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The Need For Story

The Need For Story | Creatively Aging | Scoop.it

Kahneman continues by explaining that we can think of our brains having two controlling systems, an intuitive system and a rational system. The intuitive system is fast, quick to make judgement and  desperate to make a complete story to tell the slower, heavier processing rational system. It seems we have a general tendency to favour  the intuitive system and only when this fails to make sense of what we see we use the rational system. In order to keep us processing quickly we use little stories, well-known to us that are similar to the experience at hand. Even when we do not have a complete picture this system will create a story so convincing that we feel that it is real so that our rational system is convinced it doesn’t need to engage. This is why we feel so many situations are familiar. This is why we need stories.


Via Luciana Viter
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