Creatively Aging
1.0K views | +0 today
Follow
Creatively Aging
Healing through the Arts
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Claudia M. Reder from Consciousness
Scoop.it!

Mental Maps Reveal the Brain's Plug-and-Play Plasticity: Scientific American

Researchers continue to probe the limits of the brain's plasticity

 

To the brain, electronic hardware is no different from flesh and blood, suggests a study at the University of California, Berkeley. In the experiment, monkeys learned to control a computer cursor—a stand-in for a bionic limb—through microelectrodes wiretapping their motor cortex. Although this feat is nothing new, the researchers showed for the first time that a stable memory of the new accessory had formed in the brain.

 

During normal development, a baby learns to control its limbs by creating a mental map of the movable parts of its body—a motor homunculus of sorts. The new finding parallels that process, says neuroscientist Jose Carmena, who led the study, “but it’s about a prosthetic device, and that’s what is profound about it. We’re talking about an extension of your body’s schema.” In other words, once the brain-machine interface gets up to speed, our gray matter might already be set up to achieve effortless, plug-and-play-like control of electronic add-ons.

 

2 Dec 2009

Frederik Joelving


Via ddrrnt
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Claudia M. Reder from Consciousness
Scoop.it!

The Nature of Consciousness: How the Internet Could Learn to Feel

The Nature of Consciousness: How the Internet Could Learn to Feel | Creatively Aging | Scoop.it

The Internet now already has a couple of billion nodes. Each node is a computer. Each one of these computers contains a couple of billion transistors, so it is in principle possible that the complexity of the Internet is such that it feels like something to be conscious. I mean, that’s what it would be if the Internet as a whole has consciousness. Depending on the exact state of the transistors in the Internet, it might feel sad one day and happy another day, or whatever the equivalent is in Internet space.


Via ddrrnt
more...
No comment yet.