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Elderly Spur Japan Stores

Elderly Spur Japan Stores | Creatively Aging | Scoop.it
Unicharm Corp.’s sales of adult diapers in Japan exceeded those for babies for the first time last year. At Daiei Inc. supermarkets, customers can feel Japan aging -- literally: It has made shopping carts lighter.

 

Japan's demographic shifts are well-chronicled: the Japanese are having fewer children and the improvements in healthcare mean that the elderly are living longer than ever.  Combined this means that Japan's population pyramid is getting "top heavy."  This population change is having huge econmic impacts as the percentage of Japanese people is now over 23%.  Retailers and industries are heavily targeting this expanding demographic with financial clout that outspends all other cohorts.

 

Tags: Japan, declining population, economic, population, demographics, unit 2 population, East Asia, consumption.


Via Seth Dixon
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Rescooped by Claudia M. Reder from Geography Education
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Chinese passport map causes diplomatic dispute

Chinese passport map causes diplomatic dispute | Creatively Aging | Scoop.it
Experts warn that China's apparent claims to other territories could have a long-term impact on relations with its neighbours...

 

Many people assume oftentimes that a map merely reflects reality.  In this passport map, China is flexing it's regional muscles, trying to reinforce their territorial claims as legitimate.  Not surprisingly, their neighbors with competing claims are angered, calling this map dimplomatically "unacceptable."  Some look at this map and dismiss it as a glorified watermark.  What you you think the sub-text this maps is?  You can find another article on this topic in the Washington Post. 

 

Tags: cartography, China, borders.


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James Hobson's curator insight, November 21, 2014 7:20 PM

(East Asia topic 3)

This is a prime example of how all maps have a specific purpose for their making. Since all maps are in some form influenced by humans, no map can therefore be purely objective.

What if China's passport map was one of the entire world? It may be a pleasing idea for nationalist supporters, but it doesn't necessarily mean it's accepted as true. The bottom line is that it's not the ink-on-paper picture itself causing the upset as much as it is the somewhat-disguised message being sent through it.

Samuel D'Amore's curator insight, December 17, 2014 5:49 PM

While the inclusion of these islands in their passports might seem like a rather minor thing for the Chinese to have done in fact it carries far greater ramifications. By doing so the Chinese government is sending the message that in considered these areas to be part of China and this might cause tensions with the actual owners. For centuries China avoided colonization and expansion but now it seems they are tempting to make up for lost time in their aggressive claims on land and water. Hopefully this wont lead to any military conflicts in the future. 

Martin Kemp's curator insight, December 17, 2015 3:40 PM

now this is really interesting to see how china issues passports for disputed territories which they claim to be theirs, i can definitely see why places would be upset about this and how this map can be seen as incorrect.