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NaNoWriMo for Poets? PAD Challenge for November?

NaNoWriMo for Poets? PAD Challenge for November? | Creative Writers | Scoop.it
Okay, we're getting closer to November, which for some writers of fiction means it's getting closer to NaNoWriMo time. (Btw, NaNoWriMo translates into National
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NaNoPoMo?

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So you want to write? Michael Syjuco has some advice for you

So you want to write? Michael Syjuco has some advice for you | Creative Writers | Scoop.it
KUALA LUMPUR, July 27 — “Writing is a very solitary thing,” says Filipino writer Michael Syjuco.

Syjuco first came into prominence in 2008 when his debut novel Ilustrado won the Man Asian Literary Prize (awarded to the best unpublished
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How To Write A Personal Essay

How To Write A Personal Essay | Creative Writers | Scoop.it
Leslie Jamison, author of The Empathy Exams, shares her secrets.
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Ten Things That Make an Editor Stop Reading Your Manuscript

Ten Things That Make an Editor Stop Reading Your Manuscript | Creative Writers | Scoop.it

Common errors that literary agents and editors see in picture book, middle grade, and young adult manuscripts. These can cause us to say a gentle "no"... or to head to the nearest bar.

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Natasha Yim's curator insight, July 22, 8:44 AM

Great tips!

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22 Lessons From Stephen King On How To Be A Great Writer

22 Lessons From Stephen King On How To Be A Great Writer | Creative Writers | Scoop.it

Renowned author Stephen King writes stories that captivate millions of people around the world  ...

Sharon Bakar's insight:

Probably the only advice you need.

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Editorial Statement: A Tingling Pleasure

Editorial Statement: A Tingling Pleasure | Creative Writers | Scoop.it

But this is where the metaphor comes a cropper: your stories shouldn’t be gifts especially designed for a particular editor. Your stories are something you’re giving the world (or at least the small part of the world that still reads short fiction)..

Sharon Bakar's insight:

Very good on the role of an editor.  

And this might be an excellent checklist for you to apply to your own fiction:
    Is the way you’ve told this story the best (most meaningful, most fertile, most troubling) way to tell it?
    Might it work better in the past tense?
    Do you need that first paragraph?
    What’s the latest point this story can begin?
    Is the story actually interesting? (I can’t stress this one enough.)
    Are you writing in a particular tone because you think it will afford you a certain ‘literary respect’? A tone that—were it a shirt—would be a little too tight or too baggy for you?
    Is your writing true? (Not in the sense of ‘not a lie’, but is it, as Grace Paley said, ‘acutely felt’?)
    Are the stakes high enough?
    Is this a story you really need to tell?
    And what about that ending? Are you giving the reader too much? Too little? (Every writer will at some point struggle with the problem of getting the volume of a story right—is it too loud, too obvious? Too subtle, too quiet? This is where the agonising of the words, details and the colours-as-symbolic-resonance bit is so important.)

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Lorrie Moore on the Difficulties of Constructing a Writing Life

Lorrie Moore on the Difficulties of Constructing a Writing Life | Creative Writers | Scoop.it
From the time I first started writing, the trick for me has always been to construct a life in which writing could occur. I have never been blocked, never lost faith (or never lost it for longer th...
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Never let research get in the way of a good story

Never let research get in the way of a good story | Creative Writers | Scoop.it
Authors Joseph O’Connor, Jo Baker, Niamh Boyce and Justin Cartwright on the importance and pitfalls of research
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Are You a Woman? Are You Writing a Memoir? Great, Read This!

Are You a Woman? Are You Writing a Memoir? Great, Read This! | Creative Writers | Scoop.it
The popularity of women's memoirs is booming. Women from all walks of life are finding that memoirs are a way of communicating, shedding light on experiences that would go unnoticed, hidden in a world dominated by men and male preferences.
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WRITERS ON WRITING; Let Your Characters Tell You the Story

WRITERS ON WRITING; Let Your Characters Tell You the Story | Creative Writers | Scoop.it
A number of years back, a murder took place near where I lived in New Hampshire that left the citizens of the state riveted to their televisions. A young teacher at a small town high school -- married, in her 20's, with aspirations to become a television journalist -- was accused of plotting the murder of her husband. Part of what attracted people to following the case was that the accused woman, Pamela Smart, seemed so unlikely a killer. Pretty and well spoken, she had appeared on our television screens many times in the weeks before her arrest, making impassioned pleas that anyone who might know something come forward to assist the police in locating her husband's killer.
Sharon Bakar's insight:

Published 11 years ago but very useful.

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Caro Clarke - writer

Caro Clarke - writer | Creative Writers | Scoop.it
Caro Clarke: writer, presents her writing advice articles
Sharon Bakar's insight:

I have found these articles on writing craft by Caro Clarke really useful.

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Great Writers Steal

Great Writers Steal | Creative Writers | Scoop.it
Shakespeare Did It...Why Shouldn't You?
Sharon Bakar's insight:

A great blog to follow - all about learning writing craft by stealing ideas from great writers.

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Leslie Jamison: confessional writing is not self-indulgent

Leslie Jamison: confessional writing is not self-indulgent | Creative Writers | Scoop.it
When Leslie Jamison wrote a collection of personal essays she was inundated with notes from strangers longing to share their stories in return
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Need Somewhere Quiet to Write? What about a Gaol Cell?

Need Somewhere Quiet to Write? What about a Gaol Cell? | Creative Writers | Scoop.it
If having a distraction-free place to write has been that one thing stopping you from completing your manuscript, then this unique writers’ residency program might just be the answer.
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Kill your darlings: the importance of editing

Kill your darlings: the importance of editing | Creative Writers | Scoop.it
No editor has time to look at a novel twice. Leading publishers offer advice to help writers make the most of their one shot
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Five Steps to Crafting A Great First Sentence

Five Steps to Crafting A Great First Sentence | Creative Writers | Scoop.it

The infamous first sentence. It can't be too long, it can't be too short. It has to have a deep meaning, it needs to hook the reader. You MUST make it interesting.


Via Penelope
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Penelope's curator insight, July 24, 5:21 PM

 

Every piece of writing, whether short or long, must begin with a first sentence. We could argue the day away on what should make up the components of said sentence.

 

One thing we know for sure. It should draw in the reader, and evoke emotion enough to keep them reading.

 

Jordan's article gives us five food-for-thought steps to craft our first sentence. Her first recommendation is to use your imagination. What is the story about? This is your first chance to make a good impression. Don't blow it. Read on for four more excellent suggestions.

 

***This review was written by Penelope Silvers for her curated content on "Writing Rightly"***

 

Link to the original article: http://jewelsfromjordan.wordpress.com/2014/07/19/five-steps-to-crafting-a-great-first-sentence/

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A Need To Disappear: When reporters/critics assume fiction is autobiographical

A Need To Disappear: When reporters/critics assume fiction is autobiographical | Creative Writers | Scoop.it

Catherine Lacey, author of Nobody Is Ever Missing , on how writers both are and are not their characters.


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Three anti-social skills to improve your writing

Three anti-social skills to improve your writing | Creative Writers | Scoop.it
You need social skills to have a conversation in real life -- but they're quite different from the skills you need to write good dialogue. Educator Nadia Kalman suggests a few "anti-social skills," like eavesdropping and muttering to yourself, that can help you write an effective dialogue for your next story.
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This is what happens in your brain when you’re writing

This is what happens in your brain when you’re writing | Creative Writers | Scoop.it
A team of neuroscientists has scanned the brains of professional and novice writers when creating a work of fiction and gotten a glimpse of thei
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Less deceived

Less deceived | Creative Writers | Scoop.it

One of the biggest problems for any writer is, considering its importance, one of the least discussed: the extent to which what we write can or should be a direct reflection of our own experience. The writer of fiction is supposed, traditionally, to make things up, but turns out to be rather uninventive: that's his third wife he's trashing in his third novel, his fourth in his fourth, and so on. The greater the novelist, the worse he seems to be at disguising his own majestic appearances in his fiction.

Sharon Bakar's insight:

James Fenton on keeping oneself out of the story. (First published 2007 but still very much worth reading.)

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Euphemisms For Body Parts In Romance Novels : A Ranking

When it comes to sexy times in romance novels, clinical and anatomical descriptions can really ruin the mood. So it’s up to authors to work around those sex ed terms and come up with something a bit more creative. Unfortunately, … Continued
Sharon Bakar's insight:

Useful reference for the would-be romance writer!

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Examining, and Easing, the Anxiety of Authorship

Examining, and Easing, the Anxiety of Authorship | Creative Writers | Scoop.it
George Eliot's partner protected her from reviews. Isak Dinesen reduced the anxiety of exposure by ducking behind a pseudonym. The Pulitzer Prize-winning poet Louise Gluck once said she felt ''anxiety'' before writing and ''dread'' upon publication. And recently, Judith Thurman, a National Book Award-winning biographer, told an audience of psychologists and psychoanalysts: ''The anxiety of authorship is one of the very few topics on which I feel I have the authority to speak without notes, research or preparation because there is not a nerve in my writer's body that isn't anxious most of the time.''
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The Art of Writing by Lisa Cote

The Art of Writing by Lisa Cote | Creative Writers | Scoop.it

One of my musician friends told me of the penny whistle (or tin whistle) that it is "easy to play but extremely difficult to play well." I believe the same is true of poetry: it's 'easy' to produce a few verses of poetry, as opposed to a few chapters of a novel, but it's quite challenging to produce quality poems. After all, because of its brevity, a poem's every word holds that much more weight, and must be chosen with great care. Here are some tips to help you choose wisely:

 

1. Narrow your focus: Grandiose themes like 'love' and 'injustice' need to be pared down to managable size. What sort of love, what kind of injustice?

 

2. Write around your theme: Is your poem about love? Then don't use the word 'love' in your poem! (What a bland word it has become, after all . . .) Instead, describe the precise feeling, build a metaphor, write around the idea of love to get through to the core of what you're trying to evoke.

 

3. Express ideas, not emotions: Poetry is more than a venting of feelings (that's what a diary is for!). Put some intellectual distance between yourself and the subject matter of your poetry.

 

4. Ditch the Rhymes: Don't rhyme for the sake of rhyming. New poets tend to think they can get away with less-than-perfect rhymes, and/or rhymes divorced from meter. Not so! Stick to free verse unless you're prepared to work very hard at mastering formal poetry.

 

5. Edit your poems: Poetry too must undergo many revisions in order to shine. Don't be afraid of scrapping whole verses, or cutting everything down to a few good lines and rebuilding -- this is a necessary part of the process of producing great poetry.

Sharon Bakar's insight:

I'm not sure of original source - seems to be on several different websites.  

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Tone control: ‘Give yourself permission to fail’

Tone control: ‘Give yourself permission to fail’ | Creative Writers | Scoop.it
John Banville, Rachel Kushner and Peter Murphy share their wisdom on tone, voice and point of view
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How to write a modern ghost story

How to write a modern ghost story | Creative Writers | Scoop.it

The Guardian
How to write a modern ghost story
We don't believe in ghosts, so writing ghost literature for a modern readership presents particular challenges.

 

There is a fine balance between the psychological and the spectral. Ghost writing must involve a blurring between reality and madness or projection. So Sarah Waters's doctor in The Little Stranger slowly reveals himself to be an unreliable narrator; the protagonist of Charlotte Perkins Gilman's The Yellow Wallpaper is either insane or accurate. The theory that the Governess in The Turn of the Screw may be a neurotic fantasist began when Edmund Wilson wrote his Freudian psychopathology interpretation in 1934, though I believe that James did not intend this. The dead Rebecca of Daphne du Maurier's novel skews the narrator's mind as powerfully as if she had appeared thumping round Manderley. The modern ghost writer inherits a tradition of unreliable narrators, vastly ramped up by later psychoanalytic thinking. I found it interesting to subvert this by writing about apparent madness, in a girl who insists on dressing as a shabby Victorian, while the real chaos lies where no one is looking.


Via Mary Daniels Brown
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Qwerkywriter, A Mechanical USB Keyboard Inspired by Vintage Typewriter Design

Qwerkywriter, A Mechanical USB Keyboard Inspired by Vintage Typewriter Design | Creative Writers | Scoop.it
The Qwerkywriter is a mechanical USB keyboard by game developer Brian Min with a design and feel inspired by vintage typewriters. Min is currently financing production of Qwerkywriter via a Kicksta...
Sharon Bakar's insight:

Could you imagine yourself typing on this beautiful USB keyboard with vintage typewriter good looks?  I want this so badly ...

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