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10 Online Resources for Writers Who Want to Write Well

10 Online Resources for Writers Who Want to Write Well | Creative Writers | Scoop.it
The Internet is a big place. Fortunately for you, I've done the work of scouring this mighty big world wide web to bring you this list of the best resources for writers. These are sites I refer to ...
Sharon Bakar's insight:

Very useful list of sites.

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Official AndreasCY's curator insight, July 5, 2013 3:05 PM

Great and useful resources!

The Digital Aviator's curator insight, July 12, 2013 4:56 AM

Carefully crafted writing is often invisible, the reverse sticks out like the Mutt's Nuts.

Jane Steen's curator insight, July 12, 2013 1:28 PM

Not a bad starter list.

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Why Hong Kong is clamping down on creative writing

Why Hong Kong is clamping down on creative writing | Creative Writers | Scoop.it
The decision to close City University’s MFA programme is plainly intended to limit free expression – showing just how vital it is
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10 Grammar Mistakes People Love To Correct (That Aren't Actually Wrong)

10 Grammar Mistakes People Love To Correct (That Aren't Actually Wrong) | Creative Writers | Scoop.it
Are you the sort of person who just loves correcting other people's grammar? Are you sure that you're doing it right? Some things that people have been taught are rules of English grammar are really not rules at all—and some of them are flat-out wrong.
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Ask The Writer: When is it appropriate to use "you" in fiction?

"When using second person point of view, writers use “you” to refer to the main character of the story. Similar to first person point of view, second person is limited to knowing what this single character thinks and experiences. And the “you” character isn’t a general, vague everyman, but rather a specific individual, with his own personality, traits, and life experience. An example of second person point of view is Jay MacInerny’s Bright Lights, Big City:You are not the kind of guy who would  .

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Making the Time Count

Making the Time Count | Creative Writers | Scoop.it

Lately, I have had a gnawing feeling. It is in my throat and sometimes it moves to my stomach. It seems to start as soon as I think about what I have to do. It really begins to pulse when I think about what I haven’t done. I am suffering from…procrastination: the scourge of writers, the plague of completion, the seed of doubt.

Please, is there a cure?

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Ten Things That Make an Editor Stop Reading Your Manuscript

Ten Things That Make an Editor Stop Reading Your Manuscript | Creative Writers | Scoop.it
Common errors that literary agents and editors see in picture book, middle
grade, and young adult manuscripts. These can cause us to say a gentle
"no"... or to head to the nearest bar.
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Fiction University: Tricks & Tips for Catching All Those Little Typos in Your Own Work

Fiction University: Tricks & Tips for Catching All Those Little Typos in Your Own Work | Creative Writers | Scoop.it

Whether you’re writing a novel, a nonfiction book, a blog post, a magazine article, a short story, or an assignment, it’s important to go over your work several times before submitting, to make sure it’s error-free and flows well. No matter what your you’re writing, you’re your credibility will be eroded if readers find mispelled misspelled words, misused words, missing or extra words, or other typos.

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What Do We Want from Writing? Money? A Career? Recognition?

What Do We Want from Writing? Money? A Career? Recognition? | Creative Writers | Scoop.it
It’s time to rethink everything. Everything. What it means to write and what it means to write for a public — and which public. What do I want from this writing? Money? A career? Recognition? A pla...
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LEONARDO WILD's curator insight, May 8, 10:14 AM

Questions all writers will have to face—recurrently—in their writing life. The wrong answer, born from misinformed expectations, can make for a pretty shitty outlook. Writing, the act of creating stories (whether fictional or not) should be fulfillment enough—the rest is a wonderful bonus.

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Past Tense or Present Tense | Novel Writing Help

Past Tense or Present Tense | Novel Writing Help | Creative Writers | Scoop.it
If you aren't sure whether to write your novel in the past tense or the present tense, or if you have no strong feelings either way, stick with the past tense.
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Not a Real Writer: How Self-Doubt Holds Me Back

Not a Real Writer: How Self-Doubt Holds Me Back | Creative Writers | Scoop.it
When I was in high school back in the late 90’s, I had so much confidence and ambition that I got myself a copy of Writer’s Market, studied it from cover-to-cover, and started pitching a manuscript...
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3 Tips to "Show, Don't Tell" Emotions and Moods

3 Tips to "Show, Don't Tell" Emotions and Moods | Creative Writers | Scoop.it
As a writer, how do you develop mood without telling? Is it possible to build up emotional language while following the advice "Show, Don't Tell"?
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Everything You Ever Wanted to Know About Truth in Nonfiction But Were Afraid to Ask: A Bad Advice Cartoon Essay

Everything You Ever Wanted to Know About Truth in Nonfiction But Were Afraid to Ask: A Bad Advice Cartoon Essay | Creative Writers | Scoop.it
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The Workhorse and the Butterfly: Ann Patchett on Writing and Why Self-Forgiveness Is the Most Important Ingredient of Great Art

The Workhorse and the Butterfly: Ann Patchett on Writing and Why Self-Forgiveness Is the Most Important Ingredient of Great Art | Creative Writers | Scoop.it
"The ability to forgive oneself ... is the key to making art, and very possibly the key to finding any semblance of happiness in life."

"
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Is Your Idea a Short Story or Novel?

Is Your Idea a Short Story or Novel? | Creative Writers | Scoop.it
Not counting my childhood Young Authors books (for a hilarious selection of those click here), I have written only one short story: a grim ghost tale featured in Pen & Muse’s Haunted House show...
Sharon Bakar's insight:

"...many novels I read that are short on plot, heavy on backstory, and padded with inconsequential scenes, were born of premises that were best left as short stories and should have never been turned into novels."

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LEONARDO WILD's curator insight, May 20, 5:42 PM

This is a biggy. Many times, ideas have a kinetic energy behind them that might only work for shorter pieces, rather than long ones. The problem often resides in the concept of how to present the idea, and ultimately in the premise (the outcome) of the story. A short story should end with a K.O., a sudden surprising twist. Ultimately, though, the novel is something that can address an idea from many different angles, while a short story relies on the fact that stretching the idea will simply water it down.

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A Failing Grade for the Present Tense

Pauline experienced many perils, but none to compare with the perils of the present tense. She was tied to tracks, left to teeter on window ledges, allowed to hang from cliffs by the lace in her pantaloons. Yet in the week while we waited for her bloomers to rip or the train to come, time held its breath as we held ours -in serial suspension; that is, we calmly ignored the pause in her plight as we went about our business, placing our modest cares in a parenthetical phrase; because, when the lace on her undies relaxed at last, when the train's hoot grew cruelly closer, or when Pauline's delicate balance seemed to have slipped beyond refooting, then her peril continued as if there had never been an interruption, not a shiver was missing, or a screech from a scream; and, in order to reassure us of this, the second episode

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On writing: authors reveal the secrets of their craft

On writing: authors reveal the secrets of their craft | Creative Writers | Scoop.it
Listen in to interviews with some of our most celebrated writers recorded for the British Library, and enter our competition to identify the mystery writer
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The 10 Emotional Stages Of Revising Your Novel Manuscript (Which, By The Way, Your Therapist Says Are TOTALLY Normal)

The 10 Emotional Stages Of Revising Your Novel Manuscript (Which, By The Way, Your Therapist Says Are TOTALLY Normal) | Creative Writers | Scoop.it
You’ve finally finished writing a book! It’s wonderful! It’s magic! IT IS PROFOUND. Surely it will sell at auction because this is the most brilliant thing to exist in all of human history. You await the day when you have zillions of adorning fans waiting outside Barnes & Noble to purchase these
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Using The Five Senses – Bringing Your Fiction to Life

Using The Five Senses – Bringing Your Fiction to Life | Creative Writers | Scoop.it
One of our aims as fiction writers is to transport readers into our worlds, and to do that sucessfully, those worlds must live. We need to be really aware of our fictive worlds as we write them, inhabit them, as we weave the threads round ourselves – and then I think we must forget them – as we use the senses there as unthinkingly as we do in life. We live in our worlds when we are lost in our writing – and it is a two-way thing, isn’t it? To get lost in our fictive world it must be a place that lives, for us. What writer would choose to inhabit a monochrome world in which there are no scents or textures, in which sound is muffled or non-existent, and where, when people eat – they eat words? And if that is all we create – how much more will our reader suffer in this two-dimensional place, and hightail it out to a better world, in another book, as fast as they can? 
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The Daily Word Counts of 39 Famous Authors

The Daily Word Counts of 39 Famous Authors | Creative Writers | Scoop.it
If you want to be a published writer, you should cultivate a writing routine. Almost every writer I've interviewed has one. Creating a habit of writing - even if what you are writing is not good -...
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Past Tense or Present Tense | The Editor's Blog

Past Tense or Present Tense | The Editor's Blog | Creative Writers | Scoop.it
Which is better for fiction, past tense or present tense? A look at options for narrative tense.
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Fifty Terrible Lines from Fifty Shades of Grey

Fifty Terrible Lines from Fifty Shades of Grey | Creative Writers | Scoop.it
It still shocks the crap out of me when I realize how many people are still unfamiliar with the sheer enormity of terribleness encased in E.L. James absolutely awful book. For those who neither have the time or inclination to crack it open, here are 50 of the most absurdly hilarious lines from Fifty Shades of Grey... but trust me, we're just scratching the surface! Go on, treat your "inner goddess!"1) "Suddenly, he sits up...
Sharon Bakar's insight:

How not to write.

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The International Examiner – City University of Hong Kong announces closure of MFA writing program, authors protest decision

The International Examiner – City University of Hong Kong announces closure of MFA writing program, authors protest decision | Creative Writers | Scoop.it

The Department of English at City University of Hong Kong announced earlier this week that it plans to close its low-residency MFA creative writing program. Established five years ago by Hong Kong-based novelist Xu Xi, the two-year program is designed to provide the best education possible for aspiring creative writers, with a special focus on Asian writing in English. In protest, 25 distinguished authors from around the world, including Shawn Wong, Marilyn Chin, Luis Francia, Ravi Shankar, Tina Chang, Nami Mun, Chang-rae Lee, and Ira Sukrungruang have signed a letter to academic administrators protesting the university’s decision.

Sharon Bakar's insight:

This is really sad news, not just for writers in Hong Kong but right across the region.

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How to take charge of your plot, writing a story from beginning to end

How to take charge of your plot, writing a story from beginning to end | Creative Writers | Scoop.it
Some writers swear by writing on the fly and letting themselves be guided by their characters or by instinct. However, it is possible for all types of writers to take charge of the plot and steer it in the desired direction from the opening sentences to the final paragraph. The first thing to keep in …
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David Foster Wallace’s mind-blowing creative nonfiction syllabus: “This does not mean an essayist’s goal is to ‘share’ or ‘express herself’ or whatever feel-good term you got taught in high school”

David Foster Wallace’s mind-blowing creative nonfiction syllabus: “This does not mean an essayist’s goal is to ‘share’ or ‘express herself’ or whatever feel-good term you got taught in high school” | Creative Writers | Scoop.it
EXCLUSIVE: Another from the DFW archive -- you'll love his literary email address and the super-smart reading list

Via Leslie Whidden
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Leslie Whidden's curator insight, April 29, 12:51 PM

Trademark DFW comments (love them):

"whatever feel-good term you might have got taught in high school"

"In the grown-up world"

"reasonably intelligent adults"

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The Value of Writing Programs: On Why I Don’t Have an M.F.A.

The Value of Writing Programs: On Why I Don’t Have an M.F.A. | Creative Writers | Scoop.it

I don’t have an M.F.A. I considered starting this essay, “I am a published writer, but I don’t have an M.F.A.,” but I thought that sounded more contentious, more chip-on-the-shoulderish than I actually feel about not having an M.F.A. I haven’t even ruled out the possibility of acquiring one, but at age 36, I have not earned a graduate degree.

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