Consciousness & Creativity
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Exploring the inner realm of intuition, consciousness and creativity
Curated by Wes Thomas
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First Pages of Best-Selling Novels: The Selection

First Pages of Best-Selling Novels: The Selection | Consciousness & Creativity | Scoop.it
First Pages of Best-Selling Novels: The Selection looks at the first page of this bestselling YA novel to see what works and what doesn't.
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Common painkiller found to damage mental and emotional wellness

Common painkiller found to damage mental and emotional wellness | Consciousness & Creativity | Scoop.it

Painkiller has unwanted emotional side effects
In a study published last year in the journal Psychological Science, acetaminophen was found to be not only a pain reliever, but an “emotion reliever” as well. In the trial, half the participants took a dose of 1000 mg of acetaminophen, which is a recommended amount, while the remaining participants were given an inactive placebo. 


After allowing about an hour for the medication to take effect, both groups were given identical tests. They viewed a number of photos specially designed to cause various positive and negative emotions. However, the scientists found that participants receiving acetaminophen didn’t react to the same highs or lows as the people who did not. The drug dampened both positive and negative emotions. 


Drug-induced ‘zombie state’ leads to relationship problems
In another experiment using the painkiller acetaminophen published in 2016 in Social Cognitive and Affective Neuroscience, 80 college students took part to determine the effects of the drug on emotional health. Again, half received a dose of 1,000 mg of acetaminophen and the other half received a placebo. 


Participants were then read a series of stories about people going through pain and asked to rate the pain of those in the stories.  The study’s results found that those given acetaminophen consistently gave lower pain ratings for people in the stories compared with those receiving placebos.  Hence the suggestion that these students are turning into ‘zombies’ – after taking a common painkiller. 


Do painkillers destroy our ability to ‘feel for others?’.....

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The Power of Perception and Critical Imagination: Alfred Kazin on Embracing Contradiction and How the Sacredness of Human Attention Shapes Our Reality

The Power of Perception and Critical Imagination: Alfred Kazin on Embracing Contradiction and How the Sacredness of Human Attention Shapes Our Reality | Consciousness & Creativity | Scoop.it
“Reality is what we take to be true,” pioneering physicist David Bohm asserted in 1977. “What we take to be true is what we believe. What we believe is based upon our perceptions. What we perceive depends on what we look for. What we look for depends on what we think. What we think depends on what we perceive. What we perceive determines what we believe. What we believe determines what we take to be true. What we take to be true is our reality.”

How our perception shapes our experience of reality, and how that can be a source of power, is what the great Jewish-American writer and literary critic Alfred Kazin (June 5, 1915–June 5, 1998) explored twenty years earlier in a series of entires from Alfred Kazin’s Journals (public library) — an immensely rewarding trove of wisdom in the tradition of the journals of Thoreau, André Gide, Anne Truitt, and Susan Sontag, which endure as a sort of secular scripture and to which I return for comfort, consolation, and emboldenment in trying times.
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Rebecca Solnit on Hope in Dark Times, Resisting the Defeatism of Easy Despair, and What Victory Really Means for Movements of Social Change

Rebecca Solnit on Hope in Dark Times, Resisting the Defeatism of Easy Despair, and What Victory Really Means for Movements of Social Change | Consciousness & Creativity | Scoop.it
“There is no love of life without despair of life,” wrote Albert Camus — a man who in the midst of World War II, perhaps the darkest period in human history, saw grounds for luminous hope and issued a remarkable clarion call for humanity to rise to its highest potential on those grounds. It was his way of honoring the same duality that artist Maira Kalman would capture nearly a century later in her marvelous meditation on the pursuit of happiness, where she observed: “We hope. We despair. We hope. We despair. That is what governs us. We have a bipolar system.”

In my own reflections on hope, cynicism, and the stories we tell ourselves, I’ve considered the necessity of these two poles working in concert. Indeed, the stories we tell ourselves about these poles matter. The stories we tell ourselves about our public past shape how we interpret and respond to and show up for the present. The stories we tell ourselves about our private pasts shape how we come to see our personhood and who we ultimately become. The thin line between agency in victimhood is drawn in how we tell those stories.
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The Science of Affection: How a Rebel Researcher Pioneered the Study of Love in the 1950s and Illuminated How Parents Shape Children’s Emotional Patterns

The Science of Affection: How a Rebel Researcher Pioneered the Study of Love in the 1950s and Illuminated How Parents Shape Children’s Emotional Patterns | Consciousness & Creativity | Scoop.it

“Who we are and who we become depends, in part, on whom we love,” psychologists Thomas Lewis, Fari Amini, and Richard Lannon observed in their indispensable A General Theory of Love. “To love without knowing how to love wounds the person we love,” the great Zen teacher Thich Nhat Hahn wrote. 


But although love has been a fixture of philosophy, ethics, and the world’s great spiritual traditions since the dawn of recorded thought, it has earned its place as a subject of science only recently, and chiefly thanks to one man — primate researcher Harry Harlow (October 31, 1905–December 6, 1981), who defied the scientific dogma of his day to unravel the psychological armature of affection, how our formative attachments shape who we become, and why love is the most primary need to be met for healthy development.

In the immeasurably captivating Love at Goon Park: Harry Harlow and the Science of Affection (public library), Pulitzer-winning writer Deborah Blum chronicles the trailblazing work and far-reaching legacy of this “chainsmoking, poetry-writing, alcoholic, impossible genius of a psychologist” — a “stubborn, scruffy, middle-aged researcher … who happens to believe that his profession is wrong and doesn’t mind saying so,” a man who “lives at the lab, dawn to dark, fueled by coffee, cigarettes, alcohol, and obsession.”

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One Skill that Will Take Your Writing from Good to Great - Copyblogger -

One Skill that Will Take Your Writing from Good to Great - Copyblogger - | Consciousness & Creativity | Scoop.it
If we wanted to be truly great writers, we had to first write many, many words. And then we had to be willing to walk away from the majority of them.
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These foods HARM your brain - beware

These foods HARM your brain - beware | Consciousness & Creativity | Scoop.it
Certain foods you eat can indeed harm your brain, both in impaired learning ability as well as impaired memory.  Even worse, the wrong food and drink choices throughout your life can even lead to the terrible and deadly disease of Alzheimers.

A friend of mine just told me that her dad died of Alzheimers recently and it was just a terrible disease where he didn't even know who she was anymore towards the end.  It's time our society starts taking degenerative diseases like Alzheimers, cancer, and heart disease more seriously throughout our lives, and not just once it's too late. Even in our 30's, 40's, and 50's, the choices we make with our daily food can PREVENT these terrible diseases.

So let's dig in with the topic today of foods that harm your brain, and what you can do about it...
 

Food #1 that HARMS your brain:  Fructose

In a 2012 UCLA study published in the Journal of Physiology, researchers found that a diet high in fructose over time can damage your memory and learning ability.
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The most stunning drone photos of the last year

The most stunning drone photos of the last year | Consciousness & Creativity | Scoop.it
See the amazing drone images that capture the world from up in the sky.
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28 of the Best Motivational TED Talk Videos to Inspire You

28 of the Best Motivational TED Talk Videos to Inspire You | Consciousness & Creativity | Scoop.it
There is one type of content that can help us get out of this vortex: TED Talks. Featuring motivational speeches from some of the most brilliant minds in the world, TED Talks cover every topic under the sun in an easy-to-understand and inspiring way.
To help you break out of your typical content mold and learn something new, we've compiled 28 of our favorite inspirational TED Talks below. You'll find a wide variety of talks in here from topics covering creativity, career success and happiness, and marketing and branding.
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All You Need, You Already Have : zen habits

All You Need, You Already Have : zen habits | Consciousness & Creativity | Scoop.it
If we remember to do so, we can give thanks for what we have. We can appreciate the beauty, the preciousness, of every moment, of being alive. It is a miracle, and we don’t have to take it for granted.

So to me the question is: how can we learn to embody this idea?

“All you need, you already have.”

Learning to Embody Enough-ness
It’s nice to say that we have all we need, but what does this mean in practice? What actions can we take to help us remember this?

I find it helpful to try to remember a few principles in my daily life:
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Beyond Your Wildest Genes by Centre for Epigenetic Expression on iTunes

Download past episodes or subscribe to future episodes of Beyond Your Wildest Genes by Centre for Epigenetic Expression for free.
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Amazon Best Sellers: Best Kindle eBooks

Amazon Best Sellers: Best Kindle eBooks | Consciousness & Creativity | Scoop.it
Discover the best Kindle eBooks in Best Sellers. Find the top 100 most popular items in Amazon Kindle Store Best Sellers.
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Can You Think Like Leonardo Da Vinci? - DrJockers.com

Can You Think Like Leonardo Da Vinci? - DrJockers.com | Consciousness & Creativity | Scoop.it
Leonardo da Vinci was a true Renaissance man and had one of the most well developed brains on the planet.  He was an accomplished scientist, mathematician, engineer, anatomist, painter, sculptor, inventor, botanist, musician, writer and botanist.

Acclaimed author, Michael Gelb, wrote the profound book called “How to Think Like Leonardo Da Vinci,” in which he discusses unique strategies that Da Vinci practiced in order to improve his skills and intelligence.  Gelb discusses in this book how human beings are gifted with an almost unlimited potential for learning and creativity and uses Da Vinci as our genius guide to show us how to unlock our dormant potential.

Da Vinci used novelty and specific brain training techniques in order to enhance his brain and develop skills in a wide variety of areas.  In particular, he focused on each of the intelligences explained in this booklet, which allowed his brain to develop in a profoundly versatile and fluent way, giving him remarkable abilities to excel in a wide variety of subjects.
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Change Your Body, Change Your Feelings « Lifebook

Our health and fitness has a profound impact on our emotional lives. Our bodies are where our emotions are experienced and stored. It is within our bodies that we discover the key to unlocking our emotional intelligence.When an emotion is triggered in your brain, it sends a series of impulses all over your brain and body. Each emotion contains a “program” that causes very specific physiological changes that ready us for certain actions.
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James Baldwin on Freedom and How We Imprison Ourselves

James Baldwin on Freedom and How We Imprison Ourselves | Consciousness & Creativity | Scoop.it
The peculiar manner in which personal and political freedom magnetize each other is what James Baldwin (August 2, 1924–December 1, 1987) explores in a piece titled “Notes for a Hypothetical Novel,” originally delivered as an address at the 1960 Esquire symposium on the writer’s role in society and later included in his altogether spectacular essay collection Nobody Knows My Name (public library).



Baldwin writes:

Freedom is not something that anybody can be given; freedom is something people take and people are as free as they want to be. One hasn’t got to have an enormous military machine in order to be un-free when it’s simpler to be asleep, when it’s simpler to be apathetic, when it’s simpler, in fact, not to want to be free, to think that something else is more important.

In a sentiment that calls to mind Nobel laureate Nadine Gordimer’s piercing words on the writer’s responsibility as a bastion of freedom, Baldwin adds:

The importance of a writer is continuous… His importance, I think, is that he is here to describe things which other people are too busy to describe.

Perhaps the most vital things for the writer to describe, Baldwin argues, are the habitual ways in which we imprison ourselves and relinquish our own freedom. Exactly half a century after Lebanese poet and philosopher Kahlil Gibran’s stirring reflections on the seeming self vs. the appearing self and shortly before Hannah Arendt formulated her enduring ideas on being vs. appearing and our impulse for self-display, Baldwin writes:
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50 Years Ago She Did Something No Woman Ever Had, 

50 Years Ago She Did Something No Woman Ever Had,  | Consciousness & Creativity | Scoop.it
This is the scenario Bobbi Gibb faced when she made up her mind in 1964 to run the Boston Marathon. At the time, prevailing wisdom was that if a female attempted to cover this distance, she would likely die in the process. But Gibb harbored an unshakable self-belief—and she knew she had to try. In her own words, here is Gibb’s incredible story of her two-year journey—one that took her across the country and back again before she became the very first woman to cross the Boston Marathon’s finish line.
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Simversity’s Neeraj Bansal talks about the future of education

Simversity’s Neeraj Bansal talks about the future of education | Consciousness & Creativity | Scoop.it
This week on Technotopia I talked to Neeraj Bansal the co-founder of education startup Simversity. He has a deep understanding of what it takes to build an online education platform and he also notes that the only jobs worth having in the future are the ones that can’t be replaced by machine learning.

Education right now, he says, is a form of data replication. But when computers and wearables are able to solve everything but the most complex problems for us why do we need to learn the basics when we could focus on more in-depth study? The answer is obviously still unclear but it’s fascinating to think about just where we’re headed in the next twenty years of learning.
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The Incidental Art Of Doodling And Why It Is So Fascinating

The Incidental Art Of Doodling And Why It Is So Fascinating | Consciousness & Creativity | Scoop.it
Facebook Twitter Google+ Pinterest StumbleUponWhat? Is doodling really an art? If a person were not really aware of what he or she is drawing, then would the results still be considered art? Yes, of course, in fact, most art comes from a level of the mind that we are not conscious of having. Doodling art...
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Crowdfunding Success Stories - YouCaring

Crowdfunding Success Stories - YouCaring | Consciousness & Creativity | Scoop.it
See how fundraisers on YouCaring have restored hope, rebuilt lives and helped support people in need through online crowdfunding.

Start your own fundraiser today.
It's free!
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BANNED “Man Made Epidemic” Film Available Online

BANNED “Man Made Epidemic” Film Available Online | Consciousness & Creativity | Scoop.it
The "banned" documentary that features three vaccine safety whistleblowers is now available online! 

Considering the devastating revelations of the CDC whistleblower, and the explosive expansion of autism diagnoses, the topic of vaccine safety (or lack thereof) has never been more controversial.

Indeed, there is a concerted effort within the mainstream media to characterize simply reporting on vaccine safety issues as "dangerous," or "irresponsible."

Last month, we reported on “Man Made Epidemic”, a European production shot in the UK, Germany, Belgium and Italy, which experienced the same censorship and vilification as “Vaxxed” with Tribeca. The film was also pulled from a famous film festival in London a few weeks ago because of intense outside pressure.

We believe that “Man Made Epidemic” is a timely and important film that contributes to the discussion regarding vaccine safety.

“Man Made Epidemic” will help parents, physicians and other concerned audiences to make more fully informed decisions regarding whether to vaccinate or not, featuring interviews with no less than three vaccine safety whistle blowers. We should also remind our audience that GreenMedInfo.com has a Vaccine Research dashboard that can be used for making informed decisions about the true risks associated with vaccination. 
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For everyone Tim Berners-Lee on the need to 're-decentralize the web'

For everyone Tim Berners-Lee on the need to 're-decentralize the web' | Consciousness & Creativity | Scoop.it
The film traces the story of the web from its prehistory as a twinkle in Berners-Lee’s eye to the various dangers it faces today: surveillance, the loss of net neutrality and an excess of commercialization and centralization. It should be absorbing for anyone not aware of this history, and it’s a good refresher for those of us who are.

“I thought that it’s crazy many of us don’t think about where the web came from and what a miracle it is that it exists in the form it does,” Yu said in introducing the film, which would premiere an hour later.
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What Every Student Needs

What Every Student Needs | Consciousness & Creativity | Scoop.it
There is no perfect lesson, unit, or school any more than their can be a perfect song, flavor, or shade of blue.

Every student is different. Every single intelligent, forgetful, smiling, moody, enthusiastic, apathetic, reflective, short-sighted little (or big) human being that walks into your classroom on a daily basis has their own story–one full of promise, heart-break, and complexity. And this isn’t hippie nonsense. It’s true, and it matters.

So when we talk about student-centered classrooms, that too is a kind of generalization–more of an approach than a strategy. There can’t be one “student-centered” reading strategy, for example. Maybe a “class-centered,” but if it’s truly “student-centered,” well then you’d have one for each student, yes?

But what is universal? In our collective effort to design learning experiences, schools, curriculum, technology, and all the other bits of education just right, is it possible that we miss some of the more obvious pieces? Pieces that every single student needs?

That can be added to everything–curriculum, frameworks, school design, instructional strategies, and anything else that touches the mind of students?
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About - Julia Shahin Collard - Children's Book Writer and Illustrator

About - Julia Shahin Collard - Children's Book Writer and Illustrator | Consciousness & Creativity | Scoop.it
When not illustrating or writing for kids, Julia can be found herding cats, telling puntastic “jokes,” or beating kale. (Yes, beating, not eating. Kale is a Collard’s natural enemy.) She may or may not be part narwhal.

In addition to working on picture books, Julia is open to freelance illustration work including covers, interior spots, and maps (all for traditionally published books only, please).

Julia Shahin Collard’s art has been published in the Los Angeles Times, as well as exhibited in the Venice Art Walk and other shows. She was honored to have a solo art show at Villa Musica in San Diego in 2013. In February 2014, she was selected as SCBWI's Featured Illustrator, she was the OC Illustrators’ Featured Artist in May 2014, and she won an Honorable Mention in 3x3 Magazine's 2015 Annual Show.
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What to eat and what to avoid


See proof that America's dietitians are controlled by food manufacturers like Coke, Pepsi, Mars M&M, General Mills and the junk food association (National Confectioner's Association). These groups are approved lecturers for dietitians' continuing education credits.
Just like how Monsanto controls conventional farmers and Pharmaceutical companies control conventional doctors, you'll find dietitians are controlled by the industry they teach about. for real truth, find an organic farmer, a holistic doctor and an ethical nutritionist.
More about the video: learn details about food choices to clear up confusions caused by the bad advice from our conventional healthcare providers so you can make wise choices for yourself and family.

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