Creative output and wellbeing
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Creative output and wellbeing
Thinking about creative output as part of a "core fulfillment formula" for human beings
Curated by Lisa Hosokawa
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The Case for Arts and Mental Health | | InsideOut CommunityInsideOut Community

"One seemingly important – though paradoxical, factor in the process of achieving positive outcomes in community arts and mental health projects, is that such groups are explicitly not therapy groups in any direct sense but are first and foremost creative arts groups."

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GtR

"Our research proposal offers a radical shift in vision in mental health care - that the reciprocal sharing of creative practice, in the physical world and via digital media, could transform how professionals, informal carers and service users work together and take new opportunities to build egalitarian, appreciative and substantively connected communities - resilient communities of mutual hope, compassion and solidarity."

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Be Creative Be Well: Arts, wellbeing and local communities

"In the long-running debates about the role of the arts in society, it is increasingly accepted (and shown) that participation in creative activity can – on an individual and a communal basis – develop personal and social skills as well as technical or aesthetic knowledge. Thus, in a variety of social and institutional settings including schools, prisons and hospitals, artists are helping people to develop a range of positive behaviours, improving their ability to learn, to take responsibility, to act pro-socially, to take pleasure in creating things and so on."

 

"Unlike formal arts education or training, the participatory arts process engages with the person in their own context and by extension, as with community arts, with the everyday social formation around them."

 

"The starting point for successful projects was rarely a declaration about ‘we are going to make art’. In most cases, artists began by exploring participants’ thoughts and feelings about their own community and environment. That way, there was no intimidating ‘blank canvas’ to fill and no sense that special aptitude was needed to participate."

Lisa Hosokawa's insight:

like: "participatory arts process"

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Democratizing Design - The shift in innovation to the individual

Democratizing Design - The shift in innovation to the individual | Creative output and wellbeing | Scoop.it

"Unfortunately, it is difficult to level the playing field in design and make it easily accessible to individuals. Traditional design tools are expensive, cumbersome to deploy, difficult to learn and use, and not quite suitable for collaboration."

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Collaborative Creative Expressive Activities and Subjective Well-being

Collaborative Creative Expressive Activities and Subjective Well-being | Creative output and wellbeing | Scoop.it

"Using tangible materials creatively, I transferred my internal emotions onto an external surface upon which I could meditate."

Lisa Hosokawa's insight:

Ph.D. dissertation. 

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Output as Part of a Core Fulfillment Formula

Output as Part of a Core Fulfillment Formula | Creative output and wellbeing | Scoop.it

"Cesar relies on instinct when rehabilitating dogs, but he also has a “core fulfillment formula” and “methods.” This is what is most interesting to me right now. For dogs, the core fulfillment formula is “exercise, discipline, affection,” in that order. Parents of toddlers will probably feel that some version of this is directly applicable, but humans are not dogs. One need that humans seem to have but dogs do not is creative output. (I added “creative” just so that people don’t get cute with poop jokes.) The point is that dogs do not scribble, make, and build like humans do. Humans seem driven to do so. We seem to feel compelled to give external form to something going on inside."

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Design Concepts for the Democratized

Design Concepts for the Democratized | Creative output and wellbeing | Scoop.it

"For a long time, industrial designers along with design engineers solved these problems for us. And if we had enough money, they solved them for us in an especially stylish manner.

   That all changed in the past two decades as more consumers started to reward companies for better design. Target, Ikea, and Apple all found a healthy market in “democratizing design,” that is, marketing affordable chic design concepts to the masses.

   More recently, “democratizing design” has come to mean something more. Now it’s the masses producing the design concepts."

Lisa Hosokawa's insight:

Link drawing to shift in focus from masses (feelings about use of this industrial rev term?) consuming to masses producing?

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Duffy & Partners | Perspective Why the Democratization of design is a good thing -- really

"What's required is an "open-source" dialogue that invites the audience into the creative process. The more they can relate to how designers and creative people think and work, the more they will appreciate breakthrough creativity and accept new ideas. They are, after all, the ultimate client.

I know this open-source point of view concerns some designers. It's the fear that the "amateurs" will take over much of what we hold dear. But consider my new found love of golf. I began golfing eight years ago, and now I have a genuine appreciation for what Tiger Woods does. Believe me, he is not concerned about me as a competitor. Nor do I believe that the way he and I golf is anywhere near the same in terms of process or end-result; nor will it ever be. (Damn.)

When design becomes an important part of our culture, appreciated and practiced by many, at many different levels, as it is in Japan, those who practice design as professionals will find true respect and, more importantly, an engaged and grateful audience.

Lisa Hosokawa's insight:

"Democratization of design" as an inroad to getting everyone to draw?

My motives are not the same, but using this kind of thinking could be useful.

 

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