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Hunting the spark of creativity

Hunting the spark of creativity | Creative Intelligence | Scoop.it

Until recently, decision makers could only effectively harness shared creativity from relatively small mastermind groups such as boards, panels or committees. Data from these could be placed in pre-organized, well-structured and well-categorized "buckets" to extract creative knowledge.

The relatively recent growth and development of the Internet, however, along with social network technology, provides an opportunity to expand the mastermind concept to hundreds, or thousands or even hundreds of thousands of geographically distant people.

University of Cincinnati complex systems scientist Ali Minai and a team of researchers funded by the National Science Foundation (NSF) are attempting to do just that—to develop computer-based tools to mine the Internet and communities of social media for creative insights.

 

 


Via Bernard Ryefield
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Is ‘massive open online research’ (MOOR) the next frontier for education?

Is ‘massive open online research’ (MOOR) the next frontier for education? | Creative Intelligence | Scoop.it

UC San Diego is launching the first major online course that prominently features “massive open online research” (MOOR).

 

For Bioinformatics, UC San Diego computer science and engineering professor Pavel Pevzner and his graduate students are offering a course on Coursera that combines research with a MOOC (massive open online course) for the first time.

 

“All students who sign up for the course will be given an opportunity to work on specific research projects under the leadership of prominent bioinformatics scientists from different countries, who have agreed to interact and mentor their respective teams.”

 

“The natural progression of education is for people to make a transition from learning to research, which is a huge jump for many students, and essentially impossible for students in isolated areas,” said Ph.D. student Phillip Compeau, who helped develop the online course. “By integrating the research with an interactive text and a MOOC, it creates a pipeline to streamline this transition.”

 

Bioinformatics Algorithms (Part I) will run for eight weeks starting October 21, 2013, and students are now able to sign up and download some of the course materials. It is offered free of charge to everyone.

 

Another unique feature of the online course: Pevzner and Compeau have developed Bioinformatics Algorithms: An Active-Learning Approach, a e-book supporting the course, while Pevzner’s colleagues in Russia developed a content delivery system that integrates the e-book with hundreds of quizzes and dozens of homework problems.

 

The U.S.-Russian team, led by Pevzner’s foreign student Nikolay Vyahhi, also implemented the online course using the beta version of Stepic, a new, fully integrated educational platform and startup developed by Vyahhi. Stepic derives its name from the “step-by-step, epic” solution its developers delivered for electronic publishing.

 

The course also provides access to Rosalind, a free online resource for learning bioinformatics through problem solving. Rosalind was developed by Pevzner’s students and colleagues in San Diego and St. Petersburg with funding from the Howard Hughes Medical Institute, the Russian Ministry of Education, and Russian Internet billionaires Yuri Milner and Pavel Durov through their “Start Fellows” award. Rosalind already has over 10,000 active users worldwide.

 

Rosalind — named in honor of British scientist Rosalind Franklin, whose X-ray crystallography with Raymond Gosling facilitated the discovery of the DNA double helix by Watson and Crick — will grade the programming assignments. They come in the form of bioinformatics problems of growing complexity as the course progresses.

 

“We developed Rosalind to inspire both biologists and computer science students,” said Rosalind principal developer Vyahhi, who worked with Pevzner during the latter’s sabbatical in Russia. “The platform allows biologists to develop vital programming skills for bioinformatics at their own pace, and Rosalind can also appeal to programmers who have never been exposed to some of the exciting computational problems generated by molecular biology.”


Via LilyGiraud, Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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REVEALED: Where Emotions Are 'Felt' In Your Body

REVEALED: Where Emotions Are 'Felt' In Your Body | Creative Intelligence | Scoop.it
Scientists have long known that common emotions can trigger sensations in our bodies -- whether it's butterflies in the stomach (anxiety) or hot cheeks (shame). And now a new study suggests that we all have the same bodily sensations associated with ...
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Humans can distinguish at least one trillion different odors, study shows

Humans can distinguish at least one trillion different odors, study shows | Creative Intelligence | Scoop.it

In a world perfumed by freshly popped popcorn and exhaust fumes, where sea breezes can mingle with the scents of sweet flowers or wet paint, new research has found that humans are capable of discriminating at least one trillion different odors. Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI) scientists determined that our sense of smell is prepared to recognize this vast olfactory palette after testing individuals' ability to recognize differences between complex odors mixed in the laboratory.


It has been said for decades that humans are capable of discriminating between 10,000 different odors. The number is cited in scientific literature and appears in popular magazines. "It's the generally accepted number," says HHMI investigator Leslie Vosshall, who studies olfaction at the Rockefeller University. "Our analysis shows that the human capacity for discriminating smells is much larger than anyone anticipated."


Vosshall and her colleagues published their findings March 21, 2014, in the journalScience. "I hope our paper will overturn this terrible reputation that humans have for not being good smellers," she says.

Vosshall had long been bothered by the idea that humans were limited to smelling 10,000 odors – an estimate that was made in the 1920s, and not backed by any data. "Objectively, everybody should have known that that 10,000 number had to be wrong," she says. For one thing, it didn't make sense that humans should sense far fewer smells than colors. In the human eye, Vosshall explains, three light receptors work together to see up to 10 million colors. In contrast, the typical person's nose has 400 olfactory receptors.


 

But no one had tested humans' olfactory capacity. "We know exactly the range of sound frequencies that people can hear, not because someone made it up, but because it was tested. We didn't just make up the fact that humans can't see infrared or ultraviolet light. Somebody took the time to test it," Vosshall says. "For smell, nobody ever took the time to test."

 

 

Vosshall and Andreas Keller, a senior scientist in her lab at Rockefeller University, knew they couldn't test people's reactions to 10,000 or more odors, but they knew they could come up with a better estimate. They devised a strategy to present their research subjects with complex mixtures of different odors, and then ask whether their subjects could tell them apart.

 

 

They used 128 different odorant molecules to concoct their mixtures. The collection included diverse molecules that individually might evoke grass, or citrus, or various chemicals. But when combined into random mixtures of 10, 20, or 30, Vosshall says, they became largely unfamiliar. "We didn't want them to be explicitly recognizable, so most of our mixtures were pretty nasty and weird," she says. "We wanted people to pay attention to 'here's this really complex thing – can I pick another complex thing as being different?'"


 

The scientists presented their volunteers with three vials of scents at a time: two matched, and one different. Volunteers were asked to identify the one scent that was different from the others. Each volunteer made 264 such comparisons. Vosshall and her colleagues tallied how often their 26 subjects were able to correctly identify the correct outlier. From there, they extrapolated how many different scents the average person would be able to discriminate if they were presented with all the possible mixtures that could be made from their 128 odorants. "It's like the way the census works: to count the number of people who live in the United States, you don't knock on every single door, you sample and then extrapolate," she explains. "That's how I like to think of this study. We knocked on a few doors." In this way, they estimated that the average person can discriminate between at least one trillion different odors.



Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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mirikelam's curator insight, February 18, 4:02 AM

Prêts pour de nouvelles découvertes olfactives !

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Is teaching going the way of the music and publishing industry?

Is teaching going the way of the music and publishing industry? | Creative Intelligence | Scoop.it
The music industry is filled with talented artists who can now barely make a living because of extremely low download prices. The publishing industry is filled with talented authors, but the publis...
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Google acquires UK artificial intelligence startup Deepmind for £400m

Google acquires UK artificial intelligence startup Deepmind for £400m | Creative Intelligence | Scoop.it
Buying a technology that aims to make computers think like humans, Google makes its biggest EU purchase yet and picks up British computer genius Demis Hassabis. By Samuel Gibbs
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Live 3D Organ Holograms Give an Unprecedented View to Surgeons (singularityweblog.com)

Live 3D Organ Holograms Give an Unprecedented View to Surgeons (singularityweblog.com) | Creative Intelligence | Scoop.it

An Israeli firm has developed 3D holographic imaging technology that allows doctors to see a patient’s anatomy ”floating” in mid-air during real time medical procedures. The company says successful trials of its system demonstrate that science fiction has become science fact.


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The amazing history of the Nobel Prize, told in maps and charts

The amazing history of the Nobel Prize, told in maps and charts | Creative Intelligence | Scoop.it

The U.S. has 4 percent of the world's population and 34 percent of its Nobel laureates. That's the most of any country in the world, by far: next-highest ranked is Britain with 120 laureates.

 

Up top is a heat map showing which countries have had the most Nobel laureates in the prize's history. Most countries have zero Nobel laureates. The faint yellow countries have received exactly one Nobel in the 113 years since the first prize was given. There's a small cluster of orange countries with maybe 10 to 15 Nobel laureates. A very tiny group of dark red countries have taken most of the Nobel prizes.

 

Just over 1,000 Nobels have been awarded since the prize was first established in 1901. Most of those have been in sciences but there's also the literature prize and, most famously, the peace prize. We've added up every Nobel awarded since 1901 and separated them out by country. The results are fascinating – and revealing.

 

A stunning 83 percent of all Nobel laureates have come from Western countries (that means Western Europe, the United States, Canada, Australia or New Zealand). We'll dive into some of the statistics of the Nobel below. But first here's a map of the prizes broken down by region.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Thomas Faltin's curator insight, December 31, 2013 6:22 AM

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Programming smart molecules - Space Daily

Programming smart molecules - Space Daily | Creative Intelligence | Scoop.it
Programming smart molecules
Space Daily
In a new paper presented at the Neural Information Processing Systems conference on December 7, Ryan P.
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Priorities, priorities... focus on the potential biological benefits first, AI second.

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Neurofeedback Training Proven to Slow Down Brain Aging: NCKU Research - 4-traders (press release)

Neurofeedback Training Proven to Slow Down Brain Aging: NCKU Research - 4-traders (press release) | Creative Intelligence | Scoop.it
Neurofeedback Training Proven to Slow Down Brain Aging: NCKU Research 4-traders (press release) The Distinguished Professor Shu-Lan Hsieh's research on neurofeedback training has proven to improve attention and working memory performance, National...
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Arne Duncan: ‘White suburban moms’ upset that Common Core shows their kids aren’t ‘brilliant’

Arne Duncan: ‘White suburban moms’ upset that Common Core shows their kids aren’t ‘brilliant’ | Creative Intelligence | Scoop.it
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Hunting the spark of creativity

Hunting the spark of creativity | Creative Intelligence | Scoop.it

Until recently, decision makers could only effectively harness shared creativity from relatively small mastermind groups such as boards, panels or committees. Data from these could be placed in pre-organized, well-structured and well-categorized "buckets" to extract creative knowledge.

The relatively recent growth and development of the Internet, however, along with social network technology, provides an opportunity to expand the mastermind concept to hundreds, or thousands or even hundreds of thousands of geographically distant people.

University of Cincinnati complex systems scientist Ali Minai and a team of researchers funded by the National Science Foundation (NSF) are attempting to do just that—to develop computer-based tools to mine the Internet and communities of social media for creative insights.

 

 


Via Bernard Ryefield
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Becoming Provident Providers Temporally and Spiritually

Becoming Provident Providers Temporally and Spiritually | Creative Intelligence | Scoop.it
When we live providently, we can provide for ourselves and our families and also follow the Savior’s example to serve and bless others. (We must practice the principles of provident living: joyfully living within our means.
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Building a theory and knowledge system for 'sustainability' | Santa ...

Building a theory and knowledge system for 'sustainability' | Santa ... | Creative Intelligence | Scoop.it
Building a theory and knowledge system for 'sustainability'. Oct. 23, 2013 10:19 a.m.. It's a word being attached to products, businesses, fisheries, farms, and more – but what does “sustainable” really mean?
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Inside The Pixar Braintrust

Inside The Pixar Braintrust | Creative Intelligence | Scoop.it
In this exclusive excerpt from Creativity, Inc., Ed Catmull unveils one of his key management tools--the Pixar Braintrust, which has helped the...
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Three masterminds in one business - amazing!

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The major principles and strategies of learning

The major principles and strategies of learning | Creative Intelligence | Scoop.it
On Thursday we are beginning the first session for our book club. @eduruminate has got the ball rolling and suggested John Hattie and Gregory Yates' 'Visible Learning and the Science of How We Lear...
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Prions Are Key to Preserving Long-Term Memories

Prions Are Key to Preserving Long-Term Memories | Creative Intelligence | Scoop.it

The famed protein chain reaction that made mad cow disease a terror may be involved in helping to ensure that our recollections don't fade.

 

Prions are proteins with two unusual properties: First, they can switch between two possible shapes, one that is stable on its own and an alternate conformation that can form chains. Second, the chain-forming version has to be able to trigger others to change shape and join the chain. Say that in the normal version the protein is folded so that one portion of the protein structure—call it "tab A"—fits into its own "slot B." In the alternate form, though, tab A is available to fit into its neighbor's slot B. That means the neighbor can do the same thing to the next protein to come along, forming a chain or clump that can grow indefinitely.


For a brain cell, keeping a memory around is a lot of work. A variety of proteins need to be continually manufactured at the synapse, the small gap that interfaces one cell to another. But whereas a cell may have a multitude of synapses, the protein synthesis that grows and maintains the connection only occurs at specific ones that have been activated. Work in the sea slug Aplysia (a favorite of neuroscientists because of its large cells) showed that a protein called CPEB, for cytoplasmic polyadenylation element binding, is necessary to keep a synapse activated. CPEB acts as a prion.


Once the prion's chain reaction gets started it's self-perpetuating, and thus the synapse can be maintained after the initial trigger is gone—perhaps for a lifetime. But that still doesn't explain how the first prion is triggered or why it only happens in certain synapses and not others.

 

An answer comes from Si's work on fruit flies, published February 11 in PLoS Biology. Sex—and, in particular, male courtship behavior—is an ideal realm in which to test memory: If a female is unreceptive, the male will remember this and stop trying to court her. Earlier, Si’s team showed that if the fly's version of CPEB, called Orb2, is mutated so that it cannot act as a prion, the insect briefly remembers that the female is unreceptive but that memory fades over the course of a few days.

 

Now, Si's team has figured out how the cell turns on the machinery responsible for the persistence of memory—and how the memory can be stabilized at just the right time and in the right place.

 

Before the memory is formed a fly's neuron is full of a version of the prion called Orb2B. Although this version can switch shapes to form prions' characteristic clumps, it can't get started without the related protein Orb2A. In this week's paper Si and colleagues untangled the multipartnered dance that controls Orb2A's role. First, a protein called TOB binds to Orb2A, allowing it to persist intact in the cell. (Normally, it would be broken down within a few hours.) Once stabilized it needs to have a phosphate tag attached, and this is done by another protein called Lim kinase.

 

Crucially, Lim kinase is only activated when the cell receives an electrical impulse—and only targeted at that synapse, not any other synaptic connections the cell might also be making. That means that the prion chain reaction is turned on in the specific time and place it's needed. This, researchers say, means the cell has a mechanism to stabilize some synapses but not others—potentially explaining why some of our memories fade, whereas others last a lifetime.

 

Although work so far on these proteins has been in yeast, sea slugs, flies and mice, the human CPEB may operate in the same way to preserve memories. The next steps, both researchers agree, are to develop better techniques to see where in the brain prions are activated, and to dig into more questions about how the prion process is regulated. One burning question: When we forget, does that mean that the prion's chain reaction has been halted?


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Eli Levine's curator insight, February 20, 2014 3:35 PM

They may try to make us forget, and, indeed, they may actually succeed.

 

However, science works both ways, for positive uses and for negative as well.

 

Memory loss may be helpful to some, while memory retention is good for all.

Way cool science.

 

Hope it doesn't effect us negatively in some way.

 

Think about it. 

Nacho Vega's curator insight, February 21, 2014 3:20 PM

"For a #brain cell, keeping a #memory around is a lot of work"

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Report Suggests Nearly Half of U.S. Jobs Are Vulnerable to Computerization | MIT Technology Review

Report Suggests Nearly Half of U.S. Jobs Are Vulnerable to Computerization | MIT Technology Review | Creative Intelligence | Scoop.it
Oxford researchers say that 45 percent of America’s occupations will be automated within the next 20 years.
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The authors conclude with, “Our findings thus imply that as technology races ahead, low-skill workers will reallocate to tasks that are non-susceptible to computerization—i.e., tasks that required creative and social intelligence,” the authors write. “For workers to win the race, however, they will have to acquire creative and social skills.”

 

Which leads to the question: Where is the emphasis on Creative Intelligence and Emotional/Social Intelligence? I'm not seeing enough in the STEM fervor to adequately address these rapid changes as the article points out.

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Scientists Finally Show How Your Thoughts Can Cause Specific Molecular Changes To Your Genes | TunedBody.com

Scientists Finally Show How Your Thoughts Can Cause Specific Molecular Changes To Your Genes | TunedBody.com | Creative Intelligence | Scoop.it

With evidence growing that training the mind or inducing certain modes of consciousness can have positive health effects, researchers have sought to understand how these practices physically affect the body. A new study by researchers in Wisconsin, Spain, and France reports the first evidence of specific molecular changes in the body following a period of intensive mindfulness practice.

 

The study investigated the effects of a day of intensive mindfulness practice in a group of experienced meditators, compared to a group of untrained control subjects who engaged in quiet non-meditative activities. After eight hours of mindfulness practice, the meditators showed a range of genetic and molecular differences, including altered levels of gene-regulating machinery and reduced levels of pro-inflammatory genes, which in turn correlated with faster physical recovery from a stressful situation.

 

“To the best of our knowledge, this is the first paper that shows rapid alterations in gene expression within subjects associated with mindfulness meditation practice,” says study author Richard J. Davidson, founder of the Center for Investigating Healthy Minds and the William James and Vilas Professor of Psychology and Psychiatry at the University of Wisconsin-Madison.


“Most interestingly, the changes were observed in genes that are the current targets of anti-inflammatory and analgesic drugs,” says Perla Kaliman, first author of the article and a researcher at the Institute of Biomedical Research of Barcelona, Spain (IIBB-CSIC-IDIBAPS), where the molecular analyses were conducted.


Click headline to read more--


Via Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc, Belinda Suvaal
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Give childhood back to children: if we want our offspring to have happy, productive and moral lives, we must allow more time for play, not less

Give childhood back to children: if we want our offspring to have happy, productive and moral lives, we must allow more time for play, not less | Creative Intelligence | Scoop.it
I’m a research bio-psychologist with a PhD, so I’ve done lots of school. I’m a pretty good problem-solver, in my work and in the rest of my life, but that has little to do with the schooling I’ve had.
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Great article on importance of play. Although I definitely believe we can teach creativity skills.

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The Bio-intelligence Explosion

The Bio-intelligence Explosion | Creative Intelligence | Scoop.it

How recursively self-improving organic robots will modify their own source code and bootstrap our way to full-spectrum superintelligence.


Via Szabolcs Kósa, Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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The Algorithms of Our Lives - Chronicle of Higher Education (subscription)

The Algorithms of Our Lives - Chronicle of Higher Education (subscription) | Creative Intelligence | Scoop.it
Chronicle of Higher Education (subscription) The Algorithms of Our Lives Chronicle of Higher Education (subscription) But while scholars and media and new-media theorists have covered all aspects of the IT revolution, creating fields like...
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Quantum "Rainbow" Universe Where Time May Have No Beginning and the Big Bang Never Happened

Quantum "Rainbow" Universe Where Time May Have No Beginning and the Big Bang Never Happened | Creative Intelligence | Scoop.it

What if the universe had no beginning, and time stretched back infinitely without a big bang to start things off? That's one possible consequence of an idea called "rainbow gravity," so-named because it posits that gravity's effects on spacetime are felt differently by different wavelengths of light, aka different colors in the rainbow.

 

Rainbow gravity was first proposed 10 years ago as a possible step toward repairing the rifts between the theories of general relativity (covering the very big) and quantum mechanics (concerning the realm of the very small). The idea is not a complete theory for describing quantum effects on gravity, and is not widely accepted. Nevertheless, physicists have now applied the concept to the question of how the universe began, and found that if rainbow gravity is correct, spacetime may have a drastically different origin story than the widely accepted picture of the big bang.

 

According to Einstein's general relativity, massive objects warp spacetime so that anything traveling through it, including light, takes a curving path. Standard physics says this path shouldn't depend on the energy of the particles moving through spacetime, but in rainbow gravity, it does. "Particles with different energies will actually see different spacetimes, different gravitational fields," says Adel Awad of the Center for Theoretical Physics at Zewail City of Science and Technology in Egypt, who led the new research, published in October in the Journal of Cosmology and Astroparticle Physics. The color of light is determined by its frequency, and because different frequencies correspond to different energies, light particles (photons) of different colors would travel on slightly different paths though spacetime, according to their energy.

 

The effects would usually be tiny, so that we wouldn't notice the difference in most observations of stars, galaxies and other cosmic phenomena. But with extreme energies, in the case of particles emitted by stellar explosions called gamma-ray bursts, for instance, the change might be detectable. In such situations photons of different wavelengths released by the same gamma-ray burst would reach Earth at slightly different times, after traveling somewhat altered courses through billions of light-years of time and space. "So far we have no conclusive evidence that this is going on," says Giovanni Amelino-Camelia, a physicist at the Sapienza University of Rome who has researched the possibility of such signals. Modern observatories, however, are just now gaining the sensitivity needed to measure these effects, and should improve in coming years.

 

 http://www.worldscientific.com/doi/abs/10.1142/S0218271813420212


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Vloasis's curator insight, December 9, 2013 2:23 PM

Fun stuff to ponder!

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MOOCs: Free online courses impact models of higher learning

 Web-based platforms like Coursera that offer Massive Open Online Courses are spiking in interest among academic researchers.  

Via Dr. Susan Bainbridge
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Forget the Information Age, the Age of Intelligence is born!

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Cultus's comment, November 13, 2013 3:52 PM
Once I take a course from Coursera, it was about Digital Signal Processing and it was very interesting and I learn a lot.Visit our page http://www.onlinecultus.com/ and learn more about online learning.
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Complex Adaptive Systems Conference: Emerging Technologies for Evolving Systems: Socio-technical, Cyber and Big Data

Authors are invited to submit an abstract and paper for the Complex Adaptive Systems Conference to be held November 13-15, 2013, at the Baltimore Marriott Inner Harbor at Camden Yards in Baltimore, Maryland. This year's theme is "Emerging Technologies for Evolving Systems: Socio-technical, Cyber and Big Data". Abstracts and papers should be submitted in one of the following topical areas. 

 


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The Mentoring Relationship as a Complex Adaptive System: Finding

This paper is the outcome of the authors' reflection and personal experience of mentoring, and they offer it to the field in the hope it stimulates di.
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