Creative Civiliza...
Follow
Find
5.3K views | +0 today
 
Rescooped by Jane Dunnewold from Just Story It! Biz Storytelling
onto Creative Civilization
Scoop.it!

Fab digital storytelling: The Power of Words

Wonderful and highly inspirational video. Reminds us all to strive for authentic and purposful communication. So chose your words wisely. They are extremely powerful.


Via Karen Dietz
Jane Dunnewold's insight:

I'm sharing this courtesy of Karen Dietz and Ken Mikkelson - which only proves how worthwhile it is to check out what other people are discovering and writing about on the web. Karen's take is that of a storyteller -business person. Mine is as an artist; where communication is essential and has the potential to be equally compelling. How can we as artists strive for authentic and purposeful communication?


I will hazard a guess that compelling artwork begins in my head as an idea, migrates down through my chakras/system to my heart, where it engages me emotionally, and then lifts unstoppably into my Will - or throat - where it manifests as a proclamation of what I intend to make next.Perhaps that part is sometimes a silent proclamation, but when it happens I know it.


Does your Artist Self recognize this chain of events in you? If not, pay closer attention next time an idea arises and see where it leads.


Thanks to Karen and Ken for a big lift to my afternoon!

more...
Nick Usborne's comment, March 16, 2013 8:23 PM
As it happens, if you like "story" you will probably love David Kirby's poetry.Every poem is a complete story.
Kirby Wadsworth's curator insight, March 17, 2013 3:45 PM

I've loved this video for years...always gets me

Alessandro Donadio's curator insight, March 19, 2013 7:01 PM

The power of Words

Creative Civilization
Making and Meaning at the Core of Our Being
Curated by Jane Dunnewold
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Jane Dunnewold
Scoop.it!

What to Expect

What to Expect | Creative Civilization | Scoop.it
Jane Dunnewold's insight:

There are loads of articles out there on creativity and making art. I think the really engaging stuff considers what we make and why we make it. So you can expect the curating I do to focus on the surprising, the astounding, the thoughtful and the bizarre. And if that doesn't cover it, we'll go there anyway.


I am selecting articles that encourage me to think differently - broader, deeper, wider - and that means I won't always like what I read. But hey - that's part of the growth angle of being human. And appreciating conflicting opinions is, perhaps, a right we don't take seriously enough. I am eager to share ideas with you.


Wonder how to navigate the magazine?

To Find a Topic:  Click on the Filter Tab above and type in a keyword. All the articles with that keyword will appear.


I won't be including anything gratuitious or silly. But I won't be everywhere either. So if you have an article to share, please feel free to write to me. And take a minute to visit my website: complexcloth.com.


With over twenty years experience teaching and practicing the art of mixed media and surface design, I definitely have an experience base and log of opinions. I hope sharing them will trigger a few insights for you.

Welcome.



more...
Karen Dietz's comment, February 22, 2013 1:28 PM
Love the site Jane! Can't wait to dig into the articles. Thank you so much for curating this topic.
Jane Dunnewold's comment, February 22, 2013 1:38 PM
Thanks for the nudge and the inspiration. I expect we'll find lots of common ground between your site and mine!
Karen Dietz's comment, February 22, 2013 2:49 PM
Yes, I'm looking forward to re-scooping some of your material! Have a happy day :)
Scooped by Jane Dunnewold
Scoop.it!

People Who Feel They Have A Purpose In Life Live Longer

People Who Feel They Have A Purpose In Life Live Longer | Creative Civilization | Scoop.it
Do you feel like you wander aimlessly through life, or is there a reason you're here? Psychologists say people with a sense of purpose may stress out less. Or they may lead healthier lives.
Jane Dunnewold's insight:

This piece immediately resonated with the teacher/guide in me. Working with artists - teaching new techniques and sharing ideas - puts me in touch every day with people who love what they do and are constantly stretching and growing. Even when the art making is a second career - or maybe ESPECIALLY when the art making is a second career - the commitment and excitement are tangible. Whether it's putting pen to paper or dropping lengths of fabric into a bucket of dye, the connection to the creative self is there. It's fun, it often feels magical and it's purposeful! hadn't actively thought of creating as a stress buster, but reading this article reminded me that it is.

 

 

I know in the Artist Strength Training workshops I teach there is always a discussion about the commitment we feel, the energy that is engaged by hands-on processes, and the value of writing in tandem with creating. All of it purposeful. Worth giving attention to as a way of staying mentally connected and young at heart and in spirit!

 http://www.1803artspace.com/ast/

 

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jane Dunnewold
Scoop.it!

How abstract art began with Greek sculpture

How abstract art began with Greek sculpture | Creative Civilization | Scoop.it
This abstract art post outlines the influence of Greek Sculpture upon the very early development of abstract thinking.
Jane Dunnewold's insight:

Find time to watch the video clip, which expands upon Brushfield's premise. What a Universal predicament: striving for perfection, acheiving it and then encountering dissatisfaction and desiring more. Even being bored by perfection!


In this case, creation of The Kritian Boy led to the slow but steady evolution of abstraction, as Brushfield describes it. I was reminded of the advice newbie artists receive  -  master the rules before you break them. But I'd never fully appreciated the broader evolutionary context before.


Yet it's obvious: one era of making art stands on the shoulders of that which preceded it. From the Kritian Boy to Abstract Expressionism - think of it as an evolution - humans simplifying and broadening the approach to the surface - until there was very little left that could be done to a canvas. What could possibly come next?


Starting at the beginning again? Or going interiormaking driven strictly by ideas rather than by a desire to create a perfect form?

more...
Brandon Leon's curator insight, April 17, 2:47 PM

Showcasing the preciousness of the greek artist from the Egyptian artist. 

 Facial features Eyes lips cheeks  Ect  Kritios boy of how art is advancing  Carved from marble Greek arts shows a realistic human body. Stop making this realistic art in Greek society. And the moving away from it and making unrealistic art.  Showing movement it art  Athlete and by dividing the boy into four. 
Scooped by Jane Dunnewold
Scoop.it!

Ten Great Ways to Crush Creativity - Lifehack

Ten Great Ways to Crush Creativity - Lifehack | Creative Civilization | Scoop.it
Leaders have more power than they realize. They can patiently create a climate of creativity or they can crush it in a series of subtle comments and g
Jane Dunnewold's insight:

Whoa!

Reading Paul Sloane's article was one of those big "this is so right/this sucks" moments - because he succinctly stated the obvious: the narrow behaviors killing creative thinking in business are basically the same behaviors that kill creative thinking everywhere.


For instance:


Parenting. Are you the sort of parent who encourages your kids to try new things and explore like crazy? Or are you a worrywart who is passing on fear and negative thinking to the next generation? Take a look at yourself - whose fears are they, anyway?


Friendship. A friend recently confided to me that he was thinking of downgrading a friendship that had been important to him. "She always tells me why what I want to do won't work, and I'm tired of it." he said. Our friends hold our hearts and visions as their own. It's up to us to support and encourage each other. And if advice seems needed, it should be offered with a disclaimer; something on the order of, "I don't want to discourage your thinking - you know I believe in you, but could we check out this angle?"


Politics. Not enough space to go there.  Ditto Religion.


And in the world of Making? The same deal breakers! As a workshop instructor, Sloane's observations really resonate with me; but heck - they fit being in the studio alone, too. Here's what it looks like:


Ten Great Ways to Crush Creativity - the Artist's Version


1. Criticize. There's a nice way to say anything. Teachers who belittle or behave dismissively toward students break trust with them. It's always about ego and power, both of which should be left at the classroom door.

In the studio alone? Listen to that voice in your head. It absolutely MUST be kind or you need to retrain. Compassionate open-mindedness is good. Especially toward yourself.


2. Ban brainstorms. Not good to be in an art-focussed classroom toting the my way or the highway attitude. Not even with kids.The best ideas always come when everyone is encouraged to try anything they can think to do. Working on your own? Keep asking that all important question "What If?"


3. Hoard Problems. One of the finest discoveries of my career involved asking students to help solving problems I'd always angsted over alone. Two sinks and 20 people? What should we do? Supplies didn't show up on time? Could we work together on this?


What I found out? Students appreciated being asked to problem solve because it gave them an opportunity to invest in the class and in each other. Same thing is true one on one. If you have a technical problem or one related to design, it might help to ask around. Someone will have the answer. Or will light up the answer in you.


4. Focus on efficiency not innovation. In a workshop this is called working to a project not a process. It saps participants' abilities to make the work their own. The last thing the world needs is more art that looks like Jane Dunnewold's art. Let's see what else can happen. Your personal version? Sure, you can dye 20 scarves in three hours, but when's the last time you explored something new?


5. Overwork. It's a wise woman who knows her limitations. Whether in the studio or the classroom, it's up to each of us to know when to stop. No one ever won an award for staying in a studio way past the point of enjoyment. Or bragging about it. Showing up and working is one thing. It's good. So is walking out the door to engage with other parts of your life. Like people.


6. Adhere to the plan. A total deal breaker. New ideas whirl up spontaneously and that's a gift. Do you know how bored I would be if I taught the same class the same way every time? Jumping in from a surprising angle keeps me fresh and that's a gift to students. It serves as a model in the workshop - it's ok to see what else can happen! And when you are alone there is nothing better than following the proverbial unknown path. It's only art. You can find your way back if you don't like where you've gone. Follow the bread crumbs. You won't end up in the witch's oven.


7. Punish mistakes. This is easy. I never even think of punishing someone, as most people are already masters at doing it to themselves. Whether in a class or the studio at home, turn off the committee in your head. I can act the role of a healthy parent (see above) and help pull a student out of doldrums caused by a mistake. At home you are on your own. Wallow for a couple minutes and then dust yourself off and keep going. It's the dignified way to behave and we are all entitled to dignity.


8. Don't look outside. It's shocking how many people who call themselves artists never look at art. I spend time in every workshop tallking about what's out there... Don't worry - you are distinctly you and your mark is your mark.  It can't be copied or taken away. So check out other peoples' work fearlessly. Review. Evaluate. These practices make your own work stronger.



9. Promote people like you from within. The workshop version of this? Shutting down ideas if you don't like the student's attitude. Glomming onto students who flatter you and want to please. (it's not about you; it's about a parent for sure.) The best strategy in workshops - don't veer from the students who are strong and somewhat threatening. (yes, teachers do have issues.) Be fair to everybody, as best you can. On the homefront? Cultivate a few friends who have strong opinions. Talk about things. Stay friends with them anyway. It's all good.



10. Don't waste money on training. Everyone can learn to do everything better than it's being done now. Take a workshop with me, for example. :) Or with someone whose work you love. OR if you are at home, go on-line and check out Utube or buy a couple of instructional DVDs. We can always be better than we are right now.


That's the great hope, anyway.






more...
Rachel Lindstrom's comment, April 9, 2013 1:13 PM
@10 take Jane's class on Craftsy :)
Scooped by Jane Dunnewold
Scoop.it!

Chuck Close on Creativity, Work Ethic, and Problem-Solving vs. Problem-Creating

Chuck Close on Creativity, Work Ethic, and Problem-Solving vs. Problem-Creating | Creative Civilization | Scoop.it
"Inspiration is for amateurs -- the rest of us just show up and get to work."

Questions of why creators create, how they structure their (Can't find inspiration?
Jane Dunnewold's insight:

Close's words have kep me headed back to the studio on more than one occasion. It may be possible to teach someone strategies for working and problem solving but no one can make you go to the studio. That's the discipline you have to cultivate on your own.

more...
Jane Dunnewold's comment, April 6, 2013 11:33 AM
Thanks for brainpickings.org for some great reading.
Scooped by Jane Dunnewold
Scoop.it!

Famous Works Of Art Recreated On Toast

Famous Works Of Art Recreated On Toast | Creative Civilization | Scoop.it
The Art Toast Project is a series of famous works of art recreated using food. Each is on a canvas of browned bread. It’s brought to us by artist and apparent toast-whisperer Ida Skivenes. Sh...
Jane Dunnewold's insight:

Ok. I couldn't resist. Plus now I'm hungry.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jane Dunnewold
Scoop.it!

creative manifesto

creative manifesto | Creative Civilization | Scoop.it
We know enough, we have enough, we are enough and we care enough to make it wonderful.
Jane Dunnewold's insight:

And now for a treat on a rainy San Antonio afternoon: The Creative Manifesto from Rebelle Society - creatively maladjusted.


I love this site. It isn't afraid to make people think or hurt or laugh or cry. It's so real you begin to read and then without realizing how it happened, you're inside it.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jane Dunnewold
Scoop.it!

This Street Art Will Blow Your Mind

This Street Art Will Blow Your Mind | Creative Civilization | Scoop.it
Swiss artist Felice Varini transforms the viewer's perception of space. (RT @curiousoctopus: Indeed!
Jane Dunnewold's insight:

The street art discoveries just keep coming. One incredible artwork after another.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jane Dunnewold
Scoop.it!

Street Artist Roadsworth Brings Awesome Graphics to Urban Roads

Street Artist Roadsworth Brings Awesome Graphics to Urban Roads | Creative Civilization | Scoop.it
Just changing things a bit. Complex.com: The original buyer's guide for men. (Cute. RT "@ComplexMag: Don't slip. New street art from Roadsworth.
Jane Dunnewold's insight:

Fun! I love the later ones and can't help but wonder whether these are presented in chronological order.


From an artist's viewpoint I would love to know which ones came first, to get a glimpse into how the maker's mind worked.


Don't you love it when you are already envisioing the next piece while you finish the one you've been working on? 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jane Dunnewold
Scoop.it!

Beauty vs poverty: Haitian slums get psychedelic make-over in honour of artist Prefete Duffaut's 'cities in the sky'

Beauty vs poverty: Haitian slums get psychedelic make-over in honour of artist Prefete Duffaut's 'cities in the sky' | Creative Civilization | Scoop.it
One of Haiti's biggest shantytowns, a vast expanse of grim cinderblock homes on a mountainside in the nation's capital, is getting a psychedelic makeover that aims to be part art and part homage.
Jane Dunnewold's insight:

Be sure to scroll to the bottom to see all the photos.

 

What a little paint can do.


That part's inspiring, but even more inspiring: The partnering with those who live in the shantytown, which enables them to participate in  transforming their surroundings. A sense of ownership goes a long way.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jane Dunnewold
Scoop.it!

Happy Birthday, Yayoi Kusama!

Happy Birthday, Yayoi Kusama! | Creative Civilization | Scoop.it
Today is the 84th birthday of avant-garde artist and high priestess of the polka dot, Yayoi Kusama.
Jane Dunnewold's insight:

Take a few minutes to check out the photographs that document Yayoi Kusama's career. And then -  y'all artists out there - use her as an inspiration any time you waver because you don't think you can work on one element and its variations and not become bored.


It's one of those paradoxes - Stay the course and discover that almost anything has the ability to be endlessly fascinating. We just have to look.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Jane Dunnewold from fitness, health,news&music
Scoop.it!

LOOK: Artist Makes Portrait Of Former Pope ... Out of 17,000 Condoms

LOOK: Artist Makes Portrait Of Former Pope ... Out of 17,000 Condoms | Creative Civilization | Scoop.it
When Niki Johnson, an artist in Milwaukee, heard former Pope Benedict XVI say in 2009 that using condoms could increase the AIDS epidemic in Africa, her creative juices started flowing.

Via Ellen Diane
Jane Dunnewold's insight:
Ok, this is interesting in and of itself, but what I find even more informative is the memory it provided of teaching a workshop south of Milwaukee in a convent. The halls were LINED with feminist posters from the 1970's - and included a number of visuals that would ROCK the Vatican were they to have any idea these existed and were hanging on the walls!! Bottom line - let's acknowledge the SISTERS, the nuns - who have been silently working despite the bullshit from the HIGHER powers. Niki is aligned with them - and with the reality of each of those who have served the CHURCH - male and female - those who have done what they needed to do - whether the papacy approved or not. Isn't that how REAL LIFE moves forward? I say Bravo to Niki tonight.
more...
Rescooped by Jane Dunnewold from Digital Delights - Images & Design
Scoop.it!

Silk — Interactive Generative Art

Silk — Interactive Generative Art | Creative Civilization | Scoop.it

Via Ana Cristina Pratas
Jane Dunnewold's insight:

Just for fun. This is neat. Move the cursor to create gorgeous symmetrical designs. Could I take a screen shot of this and load it onto Spoonflower.com? KInd of cool to consider the possibilities.....

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jane Dunnewold
Scoop.it!

My Month of Minimalism Challenge

My Month of Minimalism Challenge | Creative Civilization | Scoop.it
What if you removed one material possession—just one—from your life each day for a month? What would happen? Taking the minimalism challenge.
Jane Dunnewold's insight:

Courtney Seiter sums it up. Many of us have too much randomly acquired "stuff" that we could do without.

 

Of course this applies across the board when it comes to how we live - too many silly kitchen aids; time-saving devices that don't save time because we have to clean them and figure out where to store them! Better to boil a little water if you want to cook a hotdog. Who needs to Weinie Genie?

 

Since I'm an artist, my thoughts went to all the "stuff" artists acquire in the studio over time. When I cleared out my old space so I could move into a new one, it took three garage sale/giveaways to get rid of paints, fabrics, chemicals and equipment I'd accepted as "love offerings" over the years. Or bought on a whim or in a "what if" moment.

 

Finally dawned on me - one girl's love offering easily becomes another girl's storage issue! "What ifs" can easily turn into OMG, where did all  crap come from?

 

Clearing and cleaning the studio - whether it's a second bedroom, a part of the garage, or a dedicated space - is time spent wisely. Opening physical space by clearing clutter has a wonderful secondary benefit - it opens up mental space, too. You feel lighter, spacious - ready for new thoughts and glory, glory! Possibly new acts of "making."

 

So Free Cycle a few art supplies you know in your heart of hearts you won't use any time soon. Take a bag a week to Goodwill, and while you're driving, imagine delight on the face of whoever encounters your stuff and takes it home to a studio that might be missing just what you've cast off.

 

BTW - good idea NOT to go into the store when you drop off your donation. It takes a few weeks to develop a new habit!

 

Remember:

What goes to Goodwill STAYS at Goodwill. At least until next month...

 

 

 

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Jane Dunnewold from Digital-News on Scoop.it today
Scoop.it!

40 Creative Examples of Street Art For Your Inspiration

40 Creative Examples of Street Art For Your Inspiration | Creative Civilization | Scoop.it
We all are arts fan. When it comes to street art there is no limit on imagination. Street art is evolving into new areas of creativity every day. In this-post we present an amazing collection of street artworks related to nature. Hopefully, everybody will

Via Thomas Faltin
Jane Dunnewold's insight:

The democratic component of street art is always engaging. Just think - you could go buy a box of chalk TODAY and walk outside - and draw something on the sidewalk. That's how it gets started, right?

 

NO matter how you evaluate your own ability to "create" - or draw - you can start. How inspiring is that?

 

And if it's chalk, a good rain or a shot from the hose, will wash away your first attempt and give you a clean start. Sounds like a good time for a hot summer day.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jane Dunnewold
Scoop.it!

Shea Hembrey: How I became 100 artists | Video on TED.com

How do you stage an international art show with work from 100 different artists? If you're Shea Hembrey, you invent all of the artists and artwork yourself -- from large-scale outdoor installations to tiny paintings drawn with a single-haired brush.
Jane Dunnewold's insight:

This is a good listen. he's funny and creative and I found myself wondering whether I could pull off what he did? It's an alchemical mix of belief in yourself and practice. If nothing else, his toolbox is now huge and overflowing.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jane Dunnewold
Scoop.it!

Build color confidence into your artwork - Concord Monitor

Build color confidence into your artwork - Concord Monitor | Creative Civilization | Scoop.it
Build color confidence into your artwork Concord Monitor This publicity photo provided by Abrams shows The Bordered Diamonds quilt from Kaffe Fassett's book "Simple Shapes Spectacular Quilts" (STC Craft/A Melanie Falick Book, 2010) and it also...
Jane Dunnewold's insight:

Of course Kaffe is on the money with his philosophy of seeking colors that POP....but there's the dilemma. Are some people innately better at - Dare I suggest even genius material - when it comes to intuitively knowing that colors either work or don't?


They are! And he is one.


The rest of us benefit from color theory - which like the Sun and breathing - exist whether we are willing to acknowldge Reality or not.


I admire Kaffe and his work and have enjoyed being in his presence a few times, but I think comments like his have an unintentional consequence. He thinks his words will empower students and others to explore color boldly, but for those less assured than he, the opposite occurs. Students - beginning artists - are less willing - intimidated even - to jump in. 


Unfortunately, that's what a free market attitude and survival of the fittest leads to. Those with genius perpetrate genius. Everyone else has to think it over.


I'd rather take a kinder, gentler route and commit time and resources to explaining color theory clearly and reviewing exemplary color choices.


As the eternal optimist, I believe any student I teach WILL UNDERSTAND color theory and employ it succesfully. But maybe now I am showing my weakness as a teacher. I have a lot invested emotionally in believing I can teach almost anyone to do anything, including how to use color more effectively.

more...
Susie Monday's comment, April 23, 2013 11:30 AM
Another way to think about this is to recognize that some artists (like Kaffe) have innate strengths that are about color perception (and have mastered the skills to translate that perceptual strength into form. We can all develop skills in modalities of perception that are not our "native" skills, by taking courses and workshops, with practice and even with using external tools. And we can also work to recognize OUR unique constellation of perceptual and sensory strengths -- we all have them and have had them since birth most likely. The work that we do that really honors and hones THOSE strengths are going to get us to our best, strongest and most compelling art work.
Scooped by Jane Dunnewold
Scoop.it!

Thomas Keller On Why Passion Shouldn’t Drive You

Thomas Keller On Why Passion Shouldn’t Drive You | Creative Civilization | Scoop.it
Even if you aren’t a foodie, chances are, you’ve heard the name Thomas Keller--the creative culinary force behind The French Laundry, Per Se and Bouchon.
Jane Dunnewold's insight:

Stumbled onto this article, and love his quote - which is applicable to EVERYTHING. Especially art (of course.) Passion is great. Desire is better.

Replace the food references in Keller's quote with those appropriate to art and creating/making - and there we have it.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Jane Dunnewold from Digital Delights - Images & Design
Scoop.it!

Is Google bringing us too close to art?

Is Google bringing us too close to art? | Creative Civilization | Scoop.it
The Google Art Project is changing the way we look at masterpieces—and introducing a whole new set of problems.

Via Ana Cristina Pratas
Jane Dunnewold's insight:

Do I have a right to look at any work of art as intimately as I can - without being censured by the artist or the presentation?


I've always thought so.


I think it's fascinating to look close-up at art work whenever I can. I want to  SEE the brushstrokes or stitches and discover how the artist used them to further the purpose of the work.


I find it hilarious that Brueghel "liked to hide things in his paintings - including a man "doing his business..." in the painting The Harvesters.


I don't like Georges Seurat's Sunday Afternoon on the Island of la Grande Jatte any less because the Google Art Project allows me to see that the figures are actually smears of many-colored paint. I like it more. I respect Seurat's creative defiance in the face of traditonal painting of his day.


James Elkins proposes that somehow the microscopic seeing that the Google Art Project makes possible is unnatural - allows veiwers to peer into an artist's private world somehow. As an artist, I disagree. Viewers who want to see detail will seek detail and relish it. Others will observe, perhaps have an opinion or two, and move on. Those who practice the fine art of making as I do, may agree that part of the joy of appreciating work includes analyzing how it was done. It's the whole package.


I may never be able to lift a Joseph Cornell box in my hands and tilt it - in order to see the parts move (as he intended) - but I love the possiblity of seeing his work at an unprecedentedly intimate range. Will I see imperfections? Probably. Will I still love it? Absolutely. Perhaps even more than I do now. 


Knowing full well the reclusive nature of Cornell's life, is my desire to see his work up close an intrusion? He might have seen it that way. Or he might have loved my flattering interest.


The thing about making is - it's an act that is inevitably about not being in control. What artists do is create. What I do is create. What the audience, the critics, the gallery or those who walk the planet after I die, have to say about the work is out of my control. I could destroy everything right after I make it; that's one solution. But making it, loving it, and letting it go is less of a time waster. And ultimately more satisfying.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jane Dunnewold
Scoop.it!

Dyslexia's Role in Forcing Creativity

Dyslexia's Role in Forcing Creativity | Creative Civilization | Scoop.it
Mounting evidence shows that many people with dyslexia are highly creative, out-of-the-box thinkers, and neuroimaging studies demonstrate that their brains really do think differently.
Jane Dunnewold's insight:

I did not realize I was dyslexic until I was past 50 and wanted to learn to play the piano. I studiously wrote out the letter representatives for the lines in the bass clef, and checked my work. I'd written the letters backwards. Tried it again and did it again. 


The next time I went to the doctor, I brought this odd experience up. I completed a simple test and it was confirmed. I am dyslexic in areas that have to do with numbers, dates and sequences.


It was a huge relief! Now I understand crazy memories from my past - and not so long past: missing flights because I had the date wrong, writing down a zip code with ten numbers instead of five, never being able to keep sequences of dye recipes in my head. And on and on. It all makes sense. I no longer feel defensive all the time. I can relax.


And yes, dyslexia has allowed me to tap my creativity in surprisingly successful ways. I solve problems in ways other people don't consider. And I am proud of it. As my psychologist sister said - I've developed coping skills the have allowed me to thrive. So it's ok.


And this article, written by Melinda Beck for the Wall Street Journal, asserts how ok it is - for lots of creative people. You may be surprised at how many bright minds have a dose - major or minor - of dyslexia in their chemistry. Check it out.



more...
Rachel Lindstrom's comment, April 9, 2013 1:23 PM
My younger daughter can read and write upside down and backwards. It didn't help her in school at all because the teachers wanted to be able to read what she wrote. I'm angry that she was taught that she was wrong and "disabled" instead of being praised for having extra abilities.
Scooped by Jane Dunnewold
Scoop.it!

39 Easy DIY Ways To Create Art For Your Walls

39 Easy DIY Ways To Create Art For Your Walls | Creative Civilization | Scoop.it
Who says art has to mean anything, or require any creativity whatsoever? Here are some cheap, simple ideas to decorate an otherwise boring wall. (Some great ideas for inexpensive artwork.
Jane Dunnewold's insight:

I like meaning. I like these ideas. Both things can be true.


Check out this set of deceptively simple ideas. They're sure to fuel the BUT IS IT ART? controversy - you know; the discussion you can never really win. 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jane Dunnewold
Scoop.it!

6 Steps to Get Unstuck and Get Your Creativity Flowing - Oprah.com

6 Steps to Get Unstuck and Get Your Creativity Flowing - Oprah.com | Creative Civilization | Scoop.it
From the famous idea factory IDEO, here are six steps proven to get your creativity flowing.
Jane Dunnewold's insight:

I clicked on this link expecting to read a bit of same old, same old. Sure, there are new ideas related to accessing creativity, but purusing tons of stuff, as I have for this column, points out how often we're re-hashing, not truly rethinking.


The message behind the message is what really grabbed me - and it's that D word. Discipline! Can believing in yourself require discipline? Because you can spend as much time as you like thinking about mind mapping, targeted journaling, reading about topics that are brand new to you, but if no action happens as a result of thinking, an opportunity is lost.


If I apply Tom Kelly's six steps to the artist's life, here's what it looks like:


1. Mind mapping: Write "new work" in the middle of the card and free associate out from there? I do this in a linear way...never thought of trying it from the inside out. Worth trying. Will report back.


2. Hire a coach? Where do you need help? Marketing? Cleaning up process? Would a workshop do it? I offer a Mastery Program in surface design processes. Participants acheive mastery over process, but we also work on how to get work out there. What could coaching do for you? Or me?


3. Journaling. It's the targetedness of this that's good. Writing about art process; what's next - keeping track of steps and positing outcomes - that's all fine and been done. Focusing on bigger dreams and working from that angle - it makes sense. I'll try it as soon as I finish writing here!


4. Exposure to new ideas. The Internet is truly a wealth of opportunity. Resolution: Read one new piece - no matter how short - every day, before launching into the day. Or better yet? At night right before bedtime when the night wheels turn as you sleep. My best ideas wake me at 4 a.m. - especially when I remember to ASK for guidance or the solution to a problem before I go to sleep. What could planting new idea seeds turn into at 4 in the morning?


But better yet - the commitment to actually DO something new or unexpected. Something that will surprise the people who know you.

Is it about new materials? Using the same skill set but changing out paper for cloth? Mud for paint? Or will you finally try a new product or a technique that's held you hostage? Something intimidating you? Tomorrow is April Fool's Day. Go for it and play. Be a fool for art.


5. Let no idea escape. A reminder and a valuable one. The dog chewed up my car notebook and I've lost at least four ideas because I haven't had anywhere to write them down. Even an idea that presents itself as clear as crystal can fade away. New notebook in order. Don't miss anything.


6. Reverse mentor. I hosted a 26 year old man for seven months. I thought I'd hate having him underfoot. And then I figured he'd never be around. I was wrong on both counts. His curiosity about how I make art and what I'm thinking translated into new thinking for me. He moved on to a new setting but remembering those discussions proves Kelly's point. I was seeing my work with fresh eyes.


Bottom line: None of the above happens without effort. Choose to engage discipline. The good news: You're worth it.





more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jane Dunnewold
Scoop.it!

Art that rocked Detroit: 80th anniversary of the DIA's Diego Rivera murals

Art that rocked Detroit: 80th anniversary of the DIA's Diego Rivera murals | Creative Civilization | Scoop.it
Eighty years ago this week, the Detroit Institute of Arts debuted 'Detroit Industry,' the monumental murals by Diego Rivera that he intended to be a tribute to Michigan's innovative technology.
Jane Dunnewold's insight:

This is a poignant piece - including a worthwhile video clip - that goes well beyond recognition of the incredible murals Diego Rivera painted at the Detroit Institute of Arts eighty years ago.


The commentary on the social and political reaction to Rivera's mural underscores the important and honorable role artists play in society - then and always. And also underscores the upheaval experienced personally by making work that challenges public opinion or perception.


The glimpses of Frida Kahlo and the list of venerable Detoit landmarks Rivera and Kahlo frequented contributes to the poignancy, since many of them are no longer standing. I find it rather amazing that a city nearly brought to its knees by mismanagement and the end of the Industrial Age has kept the murals and the Institute intact. That's admirable and lends hope to the rebirthing process happening in Detroit on a dialy basis.



more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jane Dunnewold
Scoop.it!

Shari Elf Gallery (Good and Sturdy Art From Trash)

Shari Elf Gallery (Good and Sturdy Art From Trash) | Creative Civilization | Scoop.it
Personal, portable, supportive audience by Shari Elf guaranteed 62% more effective than Twitter! Get your art today: http://t.co/5X802SFtIU
Jane Dunnewold's insight:

If you need a lift today, check out SharElf's gallery pages. I wasn't familiar with her work but was I in for a treat. and so are you.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jane Dunnewold
Scoop.it!

The Creative Brain: How Insight Works

The Creative Brain: How Insight Works | Creative Civilization | Scoop.it
Brilliant BBC Horizon documentary last night - 'The Creative Brain: How Insight Works' on the neuroscience behind creative insights - utterly compelling viewing for entrepreneurial educators like me.
Jane Dunnewold's insight:

Dave Jarman's article surfaced while I was in the middle of teaching a Design workshop for textile artists. Isn't it interesting that as much as I thought I knew about the creative process, Jarman's take caused exactly the sort of shift for me that he described in his review!


The relevant point concerned assumptions we make. The Creative Brain: How Insight Works suggests that ah ha moments often spring up because we've temporarily let go of our everyday assumptions.


One of my standard assumptions is that workshop participants are more comfortable when they know where we're headed and what we're going to do. I call it mapping the day.


But a niggling thought prevailed, and I decided to make the first exercise of the morning an open-ended one.No explanation of why we were doing what I requested, or what we would do with what we painted. The assignment? Just take black paint and Go!! Fill the page with marks.


Yeah, it was uncomfortable for the participants. There were furrowed brows, and the occasional deep sigh. A few plaintive requests for further explanation...to a deaf ear. Mine. Maybe a little discomfort is good!


Because not knowing where we were going seemed to keep us in present time. Which is a good way to approach making.


I'd swear the pages of marks we displayed later were fresher and distinctive somehow. Was it because they were made for the sake of making? Because there was NO assumption about where marks would end up or how they would be used?


I was surprised, and not sure I'm right. But I'm definitely going to try it again in another setting, and see what happens.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jane Dunnewold
Scoop.it!

How to Be Fearlessly Creative

How to Be Fearlessly Creative | Creative Civilization | Scoop.it
I've learned to separate my fears from my intuition and, at times, to follow my intuition through the fear. I've learned that love is a powerful antidote and can scare the demons back into the dark -- but according to Srinivasen S.
Jane Dunnewold's insight:

Glad to see the power of creation in the summation here.


As an artist who teaches scores of workshops every year, I have long recognized that this is the essential struggle faced down behind the studio door. Artists who "succeed" - however that may be defined - are those who set fear out on their shoulders as "monkey mind" and keep working anyway.


Recognizing fear is important for another reason and it's not to keep you from being a sociopath. Recognizing fear and moving through it to a creative victory is key to self esteem. Building self esteem helps artists - and everyone else for that matter - to keep going through difficult times. 


Thanks to Justine Musk for a thought-provoking read on a long airplane trip home!

more...
No comment yet.