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Coaching Styles | ReadyToManage

Coaching Styles | ReadyToManage | Creating new possibilities | Scoop.it

"The ways and means by which we can assist the coaching process are many and various. Even though some of the approaches can be more effective than others, in this brief article, the aim is to introduce a simple 4-quadrant grid framework that can help considerably in every coaching discussion. Like all useful models or frameworks, the situational coaching style approach is not intended to be a panacea. We all know that coaching can be extremely complex and often involves a wide variety of factors that can make the coaching experience more or less successful. This approach is therefore just “one more tool in the toolbox”.


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Belva Jennings's curator insight, February 19, 12:53 PM

Your Coaching module gave you the toolkit..it's up to you to use those tools within the context of your own coaching style.

gustavo salazar's curator insight, March 24, 6:20 AM

estilos de coaching

Terry Corby's curator insight, May 27, 11:44 AM

If you are thinking about a coach or mentor then take a read. As a mentor and coach I tend to be on the left hand side more than the right :-)

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Holding on to bright new talent

Holding on to bright new talent | Creating new possibilities | Scoop.it
Alison Coleman on getting and keeping the right candidates

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The Moral Molecule: How oxytocin can revolutionise your organisation - with Paul Zak

The Moral Molecule: How oxytocin can revolutionise your organisation - with Paul Zak | Creating new possibilities | Scoop.it

we spoke with Paul Zak, aka Dr Love, who is professor of economic psychology and management at Claremont Graduate University. He believes that increased levels of oxytocin in the brain can help to make better functioning organisations.

 

You're clearly a proponent of empathy as a powerful tool in business. But how important are emotions like empathy, love and trust alongside more "classically accepted" drivers of business success like aggression and ruthlessness in building modern businesses?

 

Zak - The leadership literature goes back and forth on whether empathy is an important quality in managers. My work on the neuroscience of organizations shows empathy as a vital part of management and as guiding both information acquisition from colleagues and from treating colleagues in appropriate ways.  

by Robin Hough

 

Culture of Empathy Builder Page: Paul Zak
http://j.mp/YhPowm

 


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Florentine van Thiel's curator insight, June 4, 2013 11:33 PM

Succès devrait-il rimer avec agression? Pas nécessairement : bonne nouvelle!

David Hain's curator insight, June 8, 2013 3:51 AM

Fascinating!

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Why we love (and love to hate) HOAs

Why we love (and love to hate) HOAs | Creating new possibilities | Scoop.it
Since asking last Monday for your thoughts about homeowner associations, we have been overwhelmed by the response. We’ve heard from real estate agents, management companies, HOA board members and owners who love, hate and tolerate HOAs.

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Love, Trust, and Candor: Today's Management Priorities

Love, Trust, and Candor: Today's Management Priorities | Creating new possibilities | Scoop.it
Candid feedback helps build better businesses.

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Love, Trust, and Candor: Today's Management Priorities

Love, Trust, and Candor: Today's Management Priorities | Creating new possibilities | Scoop.it
Candid feedback helps build better businesses.

 

When my wife asks me "Does this outfit make me look fat?" I tell her the truth. And she does the same for me. It reflects the open and honest nature of our relationship. My wife wants me to present my best possible self to the world, and I want the same for her. We trust each other to take the information in the spirit that it was intended, and also... not to freak out.

 

This approach is surprisingly successful in the workplace. I recently attended the Management Innovation eXchange (MIX) Mashup and I was pleasantly surprised to hear themes of love, trust, and candor being brought up as hot management priorities, and a demonstration of the willingness to break traditional leadership boundaries.


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Get a Dysfunctional Team Back on Track

Get a Dysfunctional Team Back on Track | Creating new possibilities | Scoop.it
Roger Schwarz, author of Smart Leaders, Smarter Teams, explains how to build trust and accountability on your team.
Download this podcast

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15 Signs You're an Entrepreneur

15 Signs You're an Entrepreneur | Creating new possibilities | Scoop.it

"One of my favorite TV shows growing up was MacGyver," confides Tony Hsieh, CEO of Las Vegas-based Zappos, "because he never had exactly the resources he needed but would somehow figure out how to make everything work out."


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"Blood on American Hands": Richard Falk on Palestine

"Blood on American Hands": Richard Falk on Palestine | Creating new possibilities | Scoop.it
The latest carnage in Gaza is part of an ongoing Israeli imperial policy, but, as Richard Falk underscores in this exclusive interview, Israel always claims that its attacks against Palestinians are provoked by the Palestinians themselves.

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Being Mistaken For Kitchen Help Just Made This Exec More Outspoken

Being Mistaken For Kitchen Help Just Made This Exec More Outspoken | Creating new possibilities | Scoop.it
Eight years ago, aspiring senator Harold Ford called investment firm president Mellody Hobson up to ask for help getting press coverage for the upcoming election.

For someone as accomplished as Hobson, this was no problem. She set up a lunch with...

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Ganga Sharma's curator insight, July 23, 11:04 AM

Contemporary & Relevant. Glacially set Mental Models. Makes me wonder what all stereotypes we might be carrying in our Indian work life scenarios... The diversity of language, customs making our society rich & varied...

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When A Dude Says That Maybe She's Asking For It, She Has The Perfect Response. So. Very. Perfect.

When A Dude Says That Maybe She's Asking For It, She Has The Perfect Response. So. Very. Perfect. | Creating new possibilities | Scoop.it
He said she was asking for it. He got the response he deserved.

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5 Vital Prerequisites to Rocket Your Dream off the Ground

5 Vital Prerequisites to Rocket Your Dream off the Ground | Creating new possibilities | Scoop.it
What is more joyous in life than having a dream and knowing it’s possible? The answer: going for it and making that dream your reality. We're going to share

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When did creative writing eat itself?

When did creative writing eat itself? | Creating new possibilities | Scoop.it
Was the experimental novel killed by the creative writing course, the conservatism of publishing and awards – or are both linked?

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Charles Tiayon's curator insight, September 11, 2013 11:59 AM

Mark McGurl's recent book, The Program Era, analyses the American novel in terms of its relationship to the explosive growth of creative writing courses in universities, from their beginnings in Iowa in 1936. McGurl writes that in 1975 there were 52 university-level creative writing programmes in the US – by 1984 there were around 150, and by 2004 more than 350 postgraduate courses and around the same number of undergraduate degrees.

 

The UK is behind the US but rapidly catching up. The university-based creative writing course in the UK arguably began with Malcolm Bradbury at the University of East Anglia in 1970, an inspiration to me when I was doing a DPhil at Oxford in the 1980s on the British experimental novel.

 

In 2012 I decided to publish this as a book. I wondered if I should update it to include experimental novels written after around 1980, but there weren't any – well, hardly any. Experimentalism in the novel virtually died in the 1980s, but was it killed by the rise of the creative writing course, the conservatism of the publishing industry, or are they both linked?

 

More novels are published today than ever – around 150,000 books in total were published in the UK in 2011 – but the industry is dominated by a small number of large publishers and access to them is increasingly through agents. Most publishers are reluctant to even read unsolicited manuscripts direct from writers. Agents have close ties to creative writing courses and their tutors; they also are reluctant to accept manuscripts from writers who have not been recommended.

 

Publishers need to make money to survive, even if they are run by booklovers, and although they have been faster to respond to the digital revolution than the music industry, they have still been hit hard. In 2006 the Booksellers Association listed 4,495 bookshops in the UK, including 1,483 independents – by June 2011, the total number had fallen to 3,683, with only 1,099 independents. Waterstones, with around 350 stores in the UK, lost over £37m in 2011.

 

The corresponding rise in physical books bought online has by no means plugged the gap for the industry. This is no climate for encouraging experimentation. As agents are entirely dependent on the success of publishers, they also need to find, on the publishers' behalf (they are agents for publishers as much as agents for writers) what they think will sell.

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Creative writing professor wins poetry award

Creative writing professor wins poetry award | Creating new possibilities | Scoop.it
Mississippi State University’s English department continues to celebrate the success of Catherine Pierce, assistant professor and co-director of the creative writing program at MSU, following her recent achievements.

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Poor technology leadership is usually just poor leadership | Dangerously Irrelevant

Poor technology leadership is usually just poor leadership | Dangerously Irrelevant | Creating new possibilities | Scoop.it

When a school leader neglects to allocate sufficient professional development time for newly-purchased classroom technologies, that’s not poor technology leadership, that’s just poor leadership.


When a school leader doesn’t provide adequate technical support personnel for a new 1:1 laptop initiative, that’s not poor technology leadership, that’s just poor leadership.


When a school leader purchases system-wide learning software with little thought given to long-term financial and instructional sustainability, that’s not poor technology leadership, that’s just poor leadership.


When a school leader fails to ensure adequate parent education and support before initiating expensive, organization-wide technology programs, that’s not poor technology leadership, that’s just poor leadership.


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Dennis T OConnor's curator insight, July 21, 1:15 AM

Scott McCleod lays it all out with refreshing candor and insight.

Deborah Welsh's curator insight, August 5, 4:01 PM

Challenging leaders to follow up on their ideas and vision.

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Managing a Winning Team Starts with the Right Personnel

Managing a Winning Team Starts with the Right Personnel | Creating new possibilities | Scoop.it
Management means lots of things... So the first question that comes to my mind is, “What can be managed?” The simple answer is anything! When I Googled that question, there were 72,800,000 results including broad categories like business, knowledge, processes, projects, stress, anger, aging, conflict, time, suppliers, weight, diabetes, data, systems and diversity … and, trust me, the list of subjects went on and on. What I also noticed from the near 73 million hits is that the most popular search for things to manage is people. That’s not a big surprise. Fundamentally people are at the heart of our business and therefore people can —and must — be managed. However, in order to manage a winning team, there are several steps involved that can be categorized as both management and leadership. I love how Stephen Covey defines the roles of leadership and management. “Management is efficiency in climbing the ladder of success; leadership determines whether the ladder is leaning against the r

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Louis Foussard's curator insight, February 11, 10:37 AM

Great article (part 1 of 5) from my friend Emily Adams at Fresh Revenues...

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Employees who feel love perform better

Employees who feel love perform better | Creating new possibilities | Scoop.it

“Love” is a not word you often hear uttered in office hallways or conference rooms. And yet, it has a strong influence on workplace outcomes. The more love co-workers feel at work, the more engaged they are. (Note: Here we’re talking about “companionate love” which is far less intense than romantic love. Companionate love is based on warmth, affection, and connection rather than passion). It may not be surprising that those who perceive greater affection and caring from their colleagues perform better, but few managers focus on building an emotional culture. That’s a mistake.

In our longitudinal study, ”What’s Love Got to Do With It?: The Influence of a Culture of Compassionate Love in the Long-term Care Setting” (forthcoming in Administrative Science Quarterly), surveyed 185 employees, 108 patients, and 42 patient family members at two points in time, 16 months apart, at a large, nonprofit long-term healthcare facility and hospital in the Northeast. Using multiple raters and multiple methods, we explored the influence that emotional culture has on employee, patient, and family outcomes. What we learned demonstrates how important emotional culture is when it comes to employee and client well-being and performance.

Employees who felt they worked in a loving, caring culture reported higher levels of satisfaction and teamwork. They showed up to work more often. Our research also demonstrated that this type of culture related directly to client outcomes, including improved patient mood, quality of life, satisfaction, and fewer trips to the ER.

While this study took place in a long-term care setting ­— which many people might consider biased toward the “emotional” — these findings hold true across industries. We conducted a follow-up study, surveying 3,201 employees in seven different industries from financial services to real estate and the results were the same. People who worked in a culture where they felt free to express affection, tenderness, caring, and compassion for one another­ were more satisfied with their jobs, committed to the organization, and accountable for their performance.

So what does a culture of companionate love look like? Imagine a pair of co-workers collaborating side by side, each day expressing caring and affection towards one another, safeguarding each other’s feelings, showing tenderness and compassion when things don’t go well. Now imagine a workplace that encourages those behaviors from everyone, where managers actively look for ways to create and reinforce close workplace relationships among employees.

Some large, well-known organizations are already leading the pack in creating cultures of companionate love. Whole Foods Market has a set of management principles that begin with “Love” and PepsiCo lists “caring” as its first guiding principle on its website. Zappos also explicitly focuses on caring as part of its values: “We are more than a team though…we are a family. We watch out for each other, care for each other and go above and beyond for each other”.

You might think all this “love business” would be hard for some people. We did, too, before we started this study, but we found love in some unlikely places. For example, we talked with employees at a large aerospace defense contractor who told us about a newly acquired division that had a strong culture of love. Employees there routinely greeted each other with a kiss on the cheek. Visiting executives from the parent company were alarmed to see this gesture, finding it not only inappropriate but possibly an invitation to sexual harassment lawsuits. Although they initially tried to prohibit such displays of affection, ultimately they decided to allow the culture to flourish within the division, simply acknowledging that it was not consistent with the more muted values of the rest of the organization.

Surely not every manager will want to gather his team for a group hug every day (nor would every employee be comfortable with that). But there are many other ways to build an emotional culture of companionate love. We suggest leaders do at least three things.

First, broaden your definition of culture. Instead of focusing on “cognitive culture” — values such as teamwork, results-orientation, or innovation — you might think about how you can cultivate and enrich emotional culture as well. Emotional culture can be based on love or other emotions, such as joy or pride.

Second, pay attention to the emotions you’re expressing to employees every day. Your mood creates a cultural blueprint for the group.

Third, consider how your company policies and practices can foster greater affection, caring, compassion, and tenderness among workers. For example, Cisco CEO John Chambers asked that he be notified within 48 hours if a close member of an employee’s family passed away. At some companies, employees can forego vacation days or organize emergency funds to help fellow employees who are struggling and need help.

Most importantly, though, it is the small moments between coworkers — a warm smile, a kind note, a sympathetic ear — day after day, month after month, that help create and maintain a strong culture of compassionate love and the employee satisfaction, productivity, and client satisfaction that comes with it.


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Vilma Bonilla's curator insight, January 14, 12:14 PM

This is true. Emotions matter and kindness and caring shows. ~ V.B.

Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, January 14, 3:28 PM

I step away from the teacher and to being a hockey coach for 35 years. One thing I learned was that players wanted to know someone cared about them. I always tell educators that if it works in hockey; it works in education and many other fields.

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The Real Difference Between Management and Leadership

The Real Difference Between Management and Leadership | Creating new possibilities | Scoop.it
The following is an excerpt from One Piece of Paper: The Simple Approach to Powerful, Personal Leadership (you can get your copy here).  This post focuses on the difference between management and leadership.  I would love to hear your thoughts on how the two are different so please share your ideas in the comments at the end of the post.

You are a leader. Management and leadership are not the same thing. The difference is simple: you manage things; you lead people. Admiral Grace Murray Hopper coined this elegant, clear distinction. Yet there is still a lot of confusion on this point.

Management is task-focused. It is short term. It is a series of checklists and to do’s that ensure the work gets done. It is taking actions to hit a budget number or deliver a project on time. Management is how we execute tasks to achieve a specific desired outcome. Said simply, it is the movement of personnel, materiel, and tasks with an exact set of measurable results in mind.

Managing things consumes a large portion of our time. It requires forms, reports, meetings, analyses, and documentation. If left unchecked, such tasks will consume every available moment in the day. Sometimes it seems all we do is work on tasks related to managing the organization. When that happens we can easily mistake management for leadership. The logic underpinning that confusion goes like this:

 

Fact 1: We are leaders.

Fact 2: Leadership is the most important thing we do.

Fact 3: Because we are leaders we only spend our time on the most important things.

Fact 4: All our time is spent working on meetings, reports, forms, and analyses.

Conclusion: Meetings, reports, forms, and analyses must be leadership because if they are not, we are not spending our time on the most important things.

The flaws in that logic are obvious when those points are presented starkly in black and white. During the workday, however, it is difficult to differentiate between management and leadership because the world is moving at such a dizzying pace. If those things are not leadership, what is?

Leadership is people-focused. It is the words spoken and actions performed that inspire something deep within another person which leads that person to act independently to advance the interests of the team. Leadership is inspiring and influencing people to act in ways they ordinarily would not.

Inspiration is the key. Great leaders have a keen ability to inspire others to tap into their own pools of energy in a way that unleashes their innate potential. For someone to be properly inspired, the leader must help that individual see how special they are to those around them.

Leadership is demonstrating that you put others before yourself and that your primary interest is their best interest. Leading entails articulating a vision of something larger than the individuals involved, helping those involved understand their role in achieving it and inspiring them to take on seemingly insurmountable challenges because they believe in your vision to the core of their being. Leadership and management work hand in hand but truly are fundamentally different concepts.

- If you’re serious about doing less managing and more leading, grab yourself a copy of One Piece of Paper: The Simple Approach to Powerful, Personal Leadership. There are plenty of suggestions in there for how you can make leadership a much larger part of your job than management. CLICK HERE to get your copy.


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5 ways to become the "best workplace"

5 ways to become the "best workplace" | Creating new possibilities | Scoop.it
Here are five ways to make employees love their workplace, be proud of their job and trust the management.

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Mark Warren's curator insight, March 23, 10:32 AM

Managers need to realise that they are "meaning makers", and they need to constantly create meaning for their employees. 

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Joy Chen: The Challenge of Working With Founders

Joy Chen: The Challenge of Working With Founders | Creating new possibilities | Scoop.it
Joy Chen answers questions about coming in as an outsider, building trust, evaluating talent and leading a diverse team.

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Create comic conversations

Create comic conversations | Creating new possibilities | Scoop.it

Episode presents players with dozens of animated stories where their choices matter. Episode also empowers writers to write and animate their own stories for our community.


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Marisol Araya Fonseca's curator insight, July 30, 9:51 AM

A great free app (iOS + Android) to help students learn conversational English.

sitiaisha2's curator insight, August 2, 7:06 PM

try

Tessa van Zadelhoff's curator insight, August 12, 2:44 PM

Digital storytelling

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Comedian's Response to Criticism of Her Red Carpet Look Deserves a Standing Ovation

Comedian's Response to Criticism of Her Red Carpet Look Deserves a Standing Ovation | Creating new possibilities | Scoop.it
"I'm sorry, I thought I had been invited to such an illustrious event because I am good at my job."

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A Poignant Music Video Talks About A Curse That Inflicts Our Country. The Curse Of Women's Abuse

A Poignant Music Video Talks About A Curse That Inflicts Our Country. The Curse Of Women's Abuse | Creating new possibilities | Scoop.it
Wake up...

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Andrea Fernandes 's curator insight, May 27, 9:25 AM

Sexually Attractive Topless Young Abused Women Literally Voiceless - well, they have a voice - it's Moby's ! And apparently the maker of the video wants to tell victims of abuse to "Wake Up". 

 

 



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objective self-awareness standards of evaluation..

file:///C:/Users/eliz/Downloads/Vallacher%20&%20Solodky%20(1979)-JESP.pdf


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moriya zenouda's curator insight, April 6, 5:54 AM

This study shows an association between moral behavior and self-standards.
(Morality is part of self-awareness)

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3 Empowering Pathways out of a Relationship Communication Meltdown

3 Empowering Pathways out of a Relationship Communication Meltdown | Creating new possibilities | Scoop.it
People often ask Aaron and I how it is that we are happily married, live together, work together and travel together 24 x 7. That can’t be easy, they say. And they’d be right.

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Doctors should try their hand at creative writing, says Na. D’Souza

Doctors should try their hand at creative writing, says Na. D’Souza | Creating new possibilities | Scoop.it

Involvement in creative writing will help medical professionals develop a humane approach towards their work, said novelist Na. D’Souza.

He was speaking after inaugurating the State-level Vaidya Sahitya Sammelan, a convention on medical literature at the Karnataka Sangha here on Sunday.

Those engaged in medical professions get an opportunity to interact in an intimate manner with persons hailing from different socio-cultural backgrounds, he said.

By using these interactions as sources, it is possible to compose interesting novels and short stories, the novelist said.

Increased dependence

Owing to changes in lifestyle, the dependence on doctors has increased in recent times.

Failure to handle emotions is also said to be a reason for many health complications. At present, awareness is lacking on problems related to lifestyle and emotions.

Doctors should author books on precautions that can be taken to avoid these diseases in simple language that can be understood easily, the novelist said.


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Charles Tiayon's curator insight, February 24, 2:33 AM

Involvement in creative writing will help medical professionals develop a humane approach towards their work, said novelist Na. D’Souza.

He was speaking after inaugurating the State-level Vaidya Sahitya Sammelan, a convention on medical literature at the Karnataka Sangha here on Sunday.

Those engaged in medical professions get an opportunity to interact in an intimate manner with persons hailing from different socio-cultural backgrounds, he said.

By using these interactions as sources, it is possible to compose interesting novels and short stories, the novelist said.

Increased dependence

Owing to changes in lifestyle, the dependence on doctors has increased in recent times.

Failure to handle emotions is also said to be a reason for many health complications. At present, awareness is lacking on problems related to lifestyle and emotions.

Doctors should author books on precautions that can be taken to avoid these diseases in simple language that can be understood easily, the novelist said.