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Rescooped by Sushma Sharma from Just Story It! Biz Storytelling
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Storytelling in Branding: Using Narrative Psychology

Storytelling in Branding: Using Narrative Psychology | Creating new possibilities | Scoop.it
Let me tell you a story. It’s a bit about our past. A bit about our future but more importantly, it concerns what is happening right now. It is also a story that nears 2,500 words because our compl…

Via Karen Dietz
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Karen Dietz's curator insight, May 18, 2015 1:20 PM

This post, written by Jeff Swystun, is a great discussion about how storytelling is changing branding and marketing. What I really like is his thorough treatment of the topic that totally makes sense for anyone in marketing.


Swystun lists 3 ways storytelling is changing branding:

  1. It's not about telling
  2. It's organic
  3. Stories don't end


#3 I'm not so keen about. I think a better way to view storytelling in branding is in terms of story cycles instead of stories that never end. The concept of story cycles will give marketers/branders much more control over their work. Why? Because eventually you need to bring closure to your audience or they will just end up frustrated and turned off.


Serial storytelling in branding is fabulous (think of the Folgers commercials where we waited for the next installment of the story). But the storyline did eventually end. The company went on then to create other stories in their ads.


There is way more to this article than just the 3 points above. There is history shared and examples given. Swystun writes an entire section on narratives moving people to action -- and how most storied ads don't. His examples show us a better way.


Lots to learn here and apply to your business. Story on!


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it 

Rescooped by Sushma Sharma from Just Story It! Biz Storytelling
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Rethink The 'Brand You' Story: Find Your Authentic Self

Rethink The 'Brand You' Story: Find Your Authentic Self | Creating new possibilities | Scoop.it

“This above all: to thine own self be true.” – Shakespeare If there’s one business slogan/fad/concept that’s in danger of becoming meaningless through overuse, it’s “brand you.”


Via Karen Dietz
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Karen Dietz's curator insight, July 15, 2013 9:56 PM

Here is what I love about this article from author Meghan Biro!


"These days I can can spot a “brand” (as opposed to an authentic person) from the first word out of his or her mouth. “Brands” tend to be a little too perfect — packaged, programmed, and plastic. They’re pushing what they think we want to buy, not their real selves. I see this unfold every day in social media – for better or for worse. It’s like the difference between processed food and the amazing stuff you can get at farmers markets."


So true, so true. Follow the steps she suggests here and you will be well on your way to being more authentic. Remember, when you are talking about your company, it's not a pitch - it's an authentic conversation. If you want to grow your business.


If you stay true to sharing your stories and being real while you are doing so, you'll do great.


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling atwww.scoop.it/t/just-story-it

Rescooped by Sushma Sharma from Just Story It! Biz Storytelling
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Neuroscience Study Identifies "Story Button" & What it Says About Brand/Human Love

Neuroscience Study Identifies "Story Button" & What it Says About Brand/Human Love | Creating new possibilities | Scoop.it
Move over focus groups. Neuroscience-based research from Innocean seeks to uncover what people really like and seemingly reveals that, sometimes...

Via Karen Dietz
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Karen Dietz's curator insight, March 13, 2014 12:48 PM

Hmmmmm -- here's some new research from neuroscience. The company Innocean wired up 8 people to measure their responses, asked them questions about brands, and then about people they love.


Guess what -- 3 of the 8 people showed more love for brands than people. Why? The brands had a stronger story attached to them. What does it mean? Their interpretation is that there is a story button in our brain.


OK -- hold on here. I've got some problems with this. I'm not a neuroscientist but some of this seems like a lot of over-reaching.


First of all -- 8 people is a very tiny sample. That 3 of the 8 had a certain experience does not mean much at all.  All the study points to is more questions. Like for the 3 people who loved their brands more than loved ones, are their relationships troubled? If so, that would naturally lead to mythologizing a watch. And is a watch a brand or simply an object evoking strong memories? Is the love for the Seattle Seahawks more about someone mythologizing their identity? And does that reflect at all on this person's love for his toddler? Ay yi yi -- I could go on.


And then to conclude there's a "story button" in the brain that is more like a switch to turn on and off is problematic for me also. We think in stories so narrative structure is much more imbedded in who we are than a pus button indicates.


So I remain highly skeptical about this study until A LOT more research is done. Read the article and tell me what you think.


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it 

Ivan Mercado Lorberg's curator insight, March 14, 2014 11:34 AM

¿Es posible "amar" o comprometerse con una marca en particular en un mundo tan poligámico como el de hoy enn día? Acá una respuesta Neurocientífica

Mervi Rauhala's curator insight, March 18, 2014 3:38 AM

Interesting study about how people "love "their favorite brands and icons even more than people. But there has to be a special story related to the product or brand, but but...The results could be also interpreted otherwise. Leaves lot of open questions.