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Why Paper Books and E-Books Can Peacefully Coexist [#Infographic]

Why Paper Books and E-Books Can Peacefully Coexist [#Infographic] | Creating a community of readers | Scoop.it
E-books solve some problems but create others, leaving room for paper books to prosper.
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Comunicación 5.0's curator insight, December 19, 2012 5:43 PM

Este estudio demuestra que los lectores e-books siguen leyendo en papel, solo que gracias al e-book, por normal general, leen más libros que antes.

Y aporta un dato curioso: para los niños, preferimos el papel...

 

"Nothing beats a good book"

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Creating a Community of Readers

Creating a Community of Readers | Creating a community of readers | Scoop.it

Resources on Pinterest to support "Creating a Community of Readers"

...... writers, readers and techies unite....

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Reluctant Readers on Pinterest

Reluctant Readers on Pinterest | Creating a community of readers | Scoop.it

"Getting kids to love to read is a gift that gives back endlessly. I'm collecting ideas of how to get kids reading."


Via Heather Stapleton, Katie Frank
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Telling our Stories: Aboriginal young people in Victoria and Digital Storytelling - IBES

Telling our Stories: Aboriginal young people in Victoria and Digital Storytelling - IBES | Creating a community of readers | Scoop.it

Download: Telling our Stories: Aboriginal young people in Victoria and Digital Storytelling (pdf: 1.5 mb) at http://broadband.unimelb.edu.au/publications/2014/Telling-Our-Stories.pdf


Via Jean Anning, Debbie Northway
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Jean Anning's curator insight, March 3, 7:04 PM

Useful also for Digital Technologies and cross-curricular priority Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander histories and culture

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Author Philip Pullman Explains Why He's Spent The Past Few Months Tweeting About A Housefly

Author Philip Pullman Explains Why He's Spent The Past Few Months Tweeting About A Housefly | Creating a community of readers | Scoop.it

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The Digital Rocking Chair's curator insight, February 24, 3:39 AM


Dan Solomon:  "Fans who have spent the better part of a decade waiting for the follow-up to the author's His Dark Materials trilogy can bide their time with the chronicles of Jeffrey the fly. Pullman discusses his unexpected creation" ...

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9 Tips for Creating a Sense of Community for Distance Learners

9 Tips for Creating a Sense of Community for Distance Learners | Creating a community of readers | Scoop.it
With ever-increasing opportunities for online learning, educators must find new ways to engage their students and create a sense of community in a virtual world.

Via Ana Cristina Pratas
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Robert Rodenbaugh's curator insight, March 8, 11:08 AM

A great list of suggestions, but overall and taking a look at #9, the key is connecting, building a relationship. Let's make sure we keep social-emotional learning (SEL) always in mind as a priority when we look to creating the education of tomorrow.

Allison Anderson's curator insight, March 10, 12:28 PM

Geared toward educational settings, but I believe these are good ideas for creating a sense of community in a corporate setting.

Nevermore Sithole's curator insight, March 14, 3:24 AM
9 Tips for Creating a Sense of Community for Distance Learners
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About - #TwitterFiction Festival 2014

About - #TwitterFiction Festival 2014 | Creating a community of readers | Scoop.it
The platform is a powerful tool for more than sharing news and telling the realities of everyday life. It’s a place where fiction thrives (Hyperlink to “What is #twitterfiction” section) The first #TwitterFiction Festival in 2012 was a five-day virtual writing celebration held entirely on Twitter. Authors and everyday people from around the world submitted... Read more »
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The Complete Über-Geek's Guide to Reading Online

The Complete Über-Geek's Guide to Reading Online | Creating a community of readers | Scoop.it

"Healthy online reading habits require constant gardening. Every Internet company provides us a little plot to tend for, and that’s how they keep our attention where they want it. But the soil is pretty gross in most of them, and the seeds are tightly regulated. If we want to read healthily, we have to build our own info gardens.

The most important gardening task is deciding what to plant — that is, what sources to read — and that’s a personal choice. The topics, tone, and perspective of your information sources are for you to determine. But the bulk of the work is in building and tending the garden, and this guide will suggest some tools and methods to help. And with the gardening work out of the way, you’ll spend most of your time cooking, eating, and sharing. That’s the delicious part, and this guide will offer my best recipes."


Via Howard Rheingold, Dennis T OConnor
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Howard Rheingold's curator insight, December 2, 2013 8:22 PM

Succinct, relevant, practical tips on online literacy skills from a skilled infotention practitioner.

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Mem Fox angry kids are playing with tech and not books

Mem Fox angry kids are playing with tech and not books | Creating a community of readers | Scoop.it
Leading Australian children's author Mem Fox finds it ''heartbreaking'' to see small children left alone with smartphones and tablets to entertain themselves, saying an increasing reliance on technology to teach children how to read could inhibit...
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teachers_as_readers.pdf


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The Most Important Lesson Schools Can Teach Kids About Reading: It's Fun

The Most Important Lesson Schools Can Teach Kids About Reading: It's Fun | Creating a community of readers | Scoop.it
Yes, strong literacy skills help students get good grades and, eventually, good jobs. But schools shouldn't forget to emphasize the joy of getting lost in a book.

Via Maria Margarida Correia, Luciana Viter
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Reading literary fiction improves empathy, study finds

Reading literary fiction improves empathy, study finds | Creating a community of readers | Scoop.it
New research shows works by writers such as Charles Dickens and Téa Obreht sharpen our ability to understand others' emotions – more than thrillers or romance novels, writes Liz Bury

Via Zarah Gagatiga
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bookshelves of doom: MASTER LIST: Book Recommendation Engines.

bookshelves of doom: MASTER LIST: Book Recommendation Engines. | Creating a community of readers | Scoop.it
I find books through a variety of sources. I keep an eye on new titles through Baker & Taylor's Booking Ahead and CATS Booking Ahead emails and by using the fancy Advanced Search function at Amazon. I read lots of...
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In the Digital Age, What Becomes of the Library? | MindShift

In the Digital Age, What Becomes of the Library? | MindShift | Creating a community of readers | Scoop.it
The main reason most parents go to libraries is to get books for their kids. So what becomes of the magic of being surrounded by books when e-readers become more prevalent?
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New York Public Library Adds Book Recommendations Powered by Bookish/Zola Books & BiblioCommons | LJ INFOdocket

New York Public Library Adds Book Recommendations Powered by Bookish/Zola Books & BiblioCommons | LJ INFOdocket | Creating a community of readers | Scoop.it
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Study: Reading Literary Fiction Can Make You Less Racist

Study: Reading Literary Fiction Can Make You Less Racist | Creating a community of readers | Scoop.it
New research finds a compelling narrative can help us sidestep stereotypes.

Via GoogleLitTrips Reading List
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GoogleLitTrips Reading List's curator insight, March 16, 2:47 PM

16 March 2014

 

An intriguing article about a study that "...suggests there’s something about well-written, sensitive fiction that draws us in and lets us identify with the characters—even if they’re from a foreign culture. This, in turn, short-circuits our tendency to stereotype."


The essence of the study revolves around the  variable controls in two recent studies summarized as follows:

 

__________

"Johnson and his colleagues describe two experiments that incorporated a 3,000-word extract from Shaila Abdullah’s 2009 novel Saffron Dreams. It revolves around “an educated and strong-willed Muslim woman, Arissa, who is assaulted in a New York City subway station,” the researchers write. The excerpt features “significant inner monologue that accentuates the protagonist’s strength of character while providing exposure to Muslim culture.”


Participants in the first experiment (68 Americans recruited online) read either the aforementioned excerpt, or a 500-word synopsis of the same scene. In the synopsis, “the descriptive language, monologue, and dialogue were removed to reduce the narrative quality,” 

__________


What is it about the removal or inclusion of descriptive language, monologue and dialogue that explains the difference between what readers absorb and contemplate and thereby "take-away" from a reading experience? 


It is implied, or at least I inferred, that there might be a tendency while reading literature to read with both our minds and our hearts, that is with our capabilities for logic and for empathy, causing what I have often referred to as the "3-Dimensionalization" of reading.


Fiction gently, but insistently, forces us to determine which characters we care about and what causes us to care or not care about them. It's a constant engagement with point and counter-point behaviors expressed by pro- and antagonist behaviors. We begin to  see examples of behaviors that exemplify a "character's Character" through his or her expressions of values, motives, and choices made when confronted by challenges to those values, motives, and choices made. And, we see them as expressed through the values, motives, an choices made by the peripheral characters all of whom bring additional dimensions to the reader's perceptions of the various plot intrigues that readers know is a fictional representation of the "truths" of human behaviors mirrored by those characters.

 

In fiction we become omnipotent yet caring spectators privy to more than just our own sense of right and wrong and levels of caring, but to multiple characters' senses of right and wrong and levels of caring. And in doing so, if the story is written well enough to maintain our engaged suspension of disbelief, we are constantly seeing our own values in light of the great and complex diversity of human behaviors that are driven by an equally great and complex diversity of forces driving not just our own but "all human value-driven behaviors."

 

It is the best of literature that is so engaging that it actually engages us in a sort of willing receptiveness to revisiting our own existing values, motives, and behaviors.And, in doing so, we become potentially more willing to adjust our receptiveness to the differences between ourselves and others.

 

Our attention then turns more towards whether or not we can appreciate  and consider adopting or rejecting the adoption of those differences once we have opened our receptiveness to revisiting the depth of our understanding of those who we had previously not given sufficient open-minded attention. We open ourselves to the vast gray areas distinguishing individuals within any group from the simplistic assumptions that come from the shallowness of black and white group defines the -driven behaviors.

 

We become open to the possibilities that human behaviors and values are better "judged" at the individual rather than group level and that it is that it is too simplistic to assume the individual's allegiance or patriotism, or alignment with large groups beliefs and values will drive that individual's behaviors in exactly the same direction as every other member of that group. Though peer pressure to not break ranks can be intense, we can come to appreciate that the individual is more than the group and group alignments are not the entirety of the individual. We con come to understand that there are those in the "other groups" with whom we have more in common than the differences defining the parameters of our group alignment.

 

Fiction can engage us in considering the myriad shades of gray in human behavior; behaviors that like it or not, are the sum total of our individual perceptions of what we believe to to be reasonable and our inevitable imperfection in balancing our selfish and selfless values-driven behaviors.

 

In spite of my moderate positions regarding portions of the Common Core Standards.for English Language Arts, I am a very strong proponent of the importance of both the skills associated with Informational reading and the benefits of engaged literary reading.

 

It IS important, no it is ESSENTIAL to appreciate the value of informational literacy. The entire human community can no longer run the risk of the anti-factual. Nor can we afford the damage caused by the well-intended but ill-informed; or the disinterested. or the superficially interested.

 

But spreadsheets and fact sheets alone can not tell the whole story. 

And, storytelling can not include all the facts. Each "adds" what the other can not do alone to one's "more complete" understanding of the human condition. 

 

Let's not allow the one to "trump" the other in importance. Facts without the synthesis of how the facts play out in the real world are as potentially dangerous as they are potentially beneficial.  Storytelling's strength is the ability to engage readers in an "entertaining" involvement in caring about how those facts play out in the real world. 

 

 ~ www.GoogleLitTrips.com ~

brought to you by GLT Global ED an educational nonprofit

 

 

 

 

 

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10 Free Audiobook Sites to Get Your Bookworm On

10 Free Audiobook Sites to Get Your Bookworm On | Creating a community of readers | Scoop.it
Here are 10 great sites where you can download and listen to free audiobooks.

Via Ricardo Lourenço, Luciana Viter
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Re-reading: The ultimate guilty pleasure?

Re-reading: The ultimate guilty pleasure? | Creating a community of readers | Scoop.it
With so many books and so little time, re-reading seems an indulgence. So why is it so popular? Hephzibah Anderson reveals why we do it – and why it’s good.

Via David Mainwood / EFL SMARTblog, Luciana Viter
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The World Wide Web at 25: Changing literature forever

The World Wide Web at 25: Changing literature forever | Creating a community of readers | Scoop.it

Via The Digital Rocking Chair, Luciana Viter
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The Digital Rocking Chair's curator insight, March 5, 3:28 PM


Jane Ciabattari:  "The World Wide Web, which turns 25 on 12 March, has brought about a radical revolution in literature – from e-books to Twitter fiction" ...

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School Librarian in Action: World Read Aloud Day 2014: Zoe's Book Talk

School Librarian in Action: World Read Aloud Day 2014: Zoe's Book Talk | Creating a community of readers | Scoop.it

Via Zarah Gagatiga
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25 Ways Schools Can Promote Literacy And Independent Reading

25 Ways Schools Can Promote Literacy And Independent Reading | Creating a community of readers | Scoop.it
25 Ways Schools Can Promote Literacy And Independent Reading

Via Karen Bonanno, Marita Thomson
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Lourense Das's curator insight, December 4, 2013 11:18 AM

Literacy and school libraries: an inextricably team to ensure children will be prepared for the future.

Tina Jameson's curator insight, December 5, 2013 5:14 PM

Article stressing the importance of school wide commitment to encouraging life long reading skills....to allow for choice and enjoyment as well as rigor.  

 

Some great practical suggestions as to how this might look and work in a school.

Nevermore Sithole's curator insight, December 6, 2013 2:34 AM

Info Literacy and independent reading

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The Case for Preserving the Pleasure of Deep Reading | MindShift

The Case for Preserving the Pleasure of Deep Reading | MindShift | Creating a community of readers | Scoop.it
The deep reading of books and the information-driven reading we do on the web are very different, both in the experience they produce and in the capacities they develop.
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Sometimes The 'Tough Teen' Is Quietly Writing Stories

Sometimes The 'Tough Teen' Is Quietly Writing Stories | Creating a community of readers | Scoop.it
In author Matt de la Peña's Mexican-American family, men who read books were seen as "soft."
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Reading gives kids an edge, study says

Reading gives kids an edge, study says | Creating a community of readers | Scoop.it
Children who read for fun may do better in the classroom than peers who rarely read.
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School Library Impact Studies | Keith Curry Lance

School Library Impact Studies | Keith Curry Lance | Creating a community of readers | Scoop.it
Keith’s latest research on the impact of school libraries and librarians is being pursued on several fronts: a major, federally-funded, statewide study in Pennsylvania; and a Colorado replication of a national study that documents the impact of the Great Recession and its aftermath on school library staffing and thereby on students’ reading scores. - See more at: http://keithcurrylance.com/school-library-impact-studies/#sthash.XODVRigp.dpuf

Via Dennis T OConnor
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Dennis T OConnor's curator insight, October 19, 2013 6:16 PM

Keith has produced the definitive research on the effectiveness of libraries. 

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BiblioNasium

BiblioNasium | Creating a community of readers | Scoop.it
Excite, encourage and engage kids to read! Check out BiblioNasium, where young readers connect & share book lists and good reads with friends, teachers & parents.
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Whiz-kid rewrites the book on literacy

Whiz-kid rewrites the book on literacy | Creating a community of readers | Scoop.it
After a slow start to reading, eight-year-old Joshua Magee-Fraser is publishing his own stories.
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