Online Teaching & Learning
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53+ Free Image Sources For Your Blog and Social Media Posts - Huffington Post

53+ Free Image Sources For Your Blog and Social Media Posts - Huffington Post | Online Teaching & Learning | Scoop.it
In social media, we're all increasingly thinking about visual content. But there's one question we get asked quite often: Where can you find free, good quality images that are cleared to use for your blog posts or social media content?...

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Sources for free images for online courses, blogs, etc.

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Khawar Ijaz's curator insight, January 2, 2015 6:18 AM

you can watch indian dramas on line http://www.dramashush.com/

Westcoast Reader's curator insight, March 5, 2015 10:59 PM

Very useful!

Heatherstreasure's curator insight, June 7, 2015 9:40 PM

A great list of Sites where you can find free photos for your blog!  

Online Teaching & Learning
how are students creating their own knowledge with digital tools
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Dial up the Dynamics: Learning Out Loud: Make Online Courses Meaningful and Accessible

Dial up the Dynamics: Learning Out Loud: Make Online Courses Meaningful and Accessible | Online Teaching & Learning | Scoop.it
Developing critical listening and speaking skills is an essential element of a student's higher-education experience. However, verbally presenting one's ideas and listening to contributions made by student peers are not typical experiences for online students, as most activities in online classes consist of reading and writing. As online course offerings increase, institutions have an obligation to ensure faculty are empowered to teach with tools that enable students to learn out loud. These tools and the content created with them must be accessible to all learners, including those who are hard of hearing and have vision impairments.

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Dennis T OConnor's curator insight, October 4, 2016 10:21 AM

Online teachers who use audio and video to connect with their students get better results. Asking your students to use audio and video tools to express their understanding dials up the dynamics of online teaching. Don't let accessibility concerns stop you! Go for it.

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Introduction to Podcasting: Creation, Development and Distribution Strategies

Introduction to Podcasting: Creation, Development and Distribution Strategies | Online Teaching & Learning | Scoop.it
The four-week course “Introduction to Podcasting: Creation, Development and Distribution Strategies” is free and open to anyone. It starts on November 14 and ends on December 11.

 

This massive open online course (MOOC) will focus on topics such as: 

Podcasting in generalStarting a podcastPodcast formats (storytelling and talk show style)Planning and scripting episodesTechnical aspectsMarketing and best practices for audio recordingLaunching a podcast

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Dennis T OConnor's curator insight, October 21, 2016 4:25 PM

I just signed up! This course appeals to me as  writer and an online educator.  Think about it.

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A Strong Case for #Uncommon #Learning - #bookreview @esheninger

A Strong Case for #Uncommon #Learning - #bookreview @esheninger | Online Teaching & Learning | Scoop.it
Today’s schools are challenged with new demands of a global economy and with students who are more connected than ever before. While the world has changed, schools have remained relatively the same in their structure and pedagogical delivery methods. In Eric Sheninger’s newest book, Uncommon Learning: Creating Schools That Work for Kids, he not only explores the necessary changes needed in our schools to be more relevant and responsive to our students’ needs today, but he also shares strategic processes and ideas to turn theory into reality.

Throughout his book, Sheninger provides concrete examples from his former school, New Milford High School, as well as others from throughout the country. Each chapter provides rationale, research, and/or models for change, with comprehensive examples and resource links sprinkled throughout to highlight how these change have been done by today’s educators. At the end of each chapter, Sheninger highlights implementation tips before a summary of the chapter. Every school and every classroom can explore these ideas in order to build uncommon learning opportunities for all students in our schools.

While there are many initiatives that can be implemented in our schools to begin to offer opportunities for our students to grow and learn in different ways, these just scratch the surface of the more important theme of the book – shifting the culture of our schools to utilize technology as a tool to enhance learning and achievement. Sheninger emphasizes this aspect continually throughout the book, putting sound pedagogy above technology in every strategic process. “Pedagogy always trumps technology” (Sheninger, 43). Technology is a tool to enhance learning outcomes, and when used appropriately, it is not the tool that matters, but the learning and experiences we can provide for our students that matter most.

Today’s schools are challenged with new demands of a global economy and with students who are more connected than ever before. While the world has changed, schools have remained relatively the same in their structure and pedagogical delivery methods. In Eric Sheninger’s newest book, Uncommon Learning: Creating Schools That Work for Kids, he not only explores the necessary changes needed in our schools to be more relevant and responsive to our students’ needs today, but he also shares strategic processes and ideas to turn theory into reality. 


Throughout his book, Sheninger provides concrete examples from his former school, New Milford High School, as well as others from throughout the country. Each chapter provides rationale, research, and/or models for change, with comprehensive examples and resource links sprinkled throughout to highlight how these change have been done by today’s educators. At the end of each chapter, Sheninger highlights implementation tips before a summary of the chapter. Every school and every classroom can explore these ideas in order to build uncommon learning opportunities for all students in our schools.

While there are many initiatives that can be implemented in our schools to begin to offer opportunities for our students to grow and learn in different ways, these just scratch the surface of the more important theme of the book – shifting the culture of our schools to utilize technology as a tool to enhance learning and achievement. Sheninger emphasizes this aspect continually throughout the book, putting sound pedagogy above technology in every strategic process. “Pedagogy always trumps technology” (Sheninger, 43). Technology is a tool to enhance learning outcomes, and when used appropriately, it is not the tool that matters, but the learning and experiences we can provide for our students that matter most.

 

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Blended Learning Toolkit: University of Central Florida and the American Association of State Colleges and Universities

Blended Learning Toolkit: University of Central Florida and the American Association of State Colleges and Universities | Online Teaching & Learning | Scoop.it

Abstract

The Blended Learning Toolkit supports the course redesign approach, and interest in its openly available clearinghouse of online tools, strategies, curricula, and other materials to support the adoption of blended learning continues to grow. When the resource originally launched in July 2011, 20 AASCU institutions used it, but now universities, colleges, and K–12 schools from around the world access the Blended Learning Toolkit.

This grantee profile from Next Generation Learning Challenges (NGLC) provides at-a-glance information, course model design details, grant project activities, results and outcomes, participant impressions, next steps, and additional resources.

NGLC accelerates educational innovation through applied technology to dramatically improve college readiness and completion in the United States. To learn more about NGLC and the grantees it supports, visit nextgenlearning.org


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T
This is a good model, easily adapted for higher education.
 
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Dennis T OConnor's curator insight, April 4, 2016 1:38 PM

Strong research based toolkit for blended learning.

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Online Discussion Boards: Strategies to Ease Instructor Burden and Promote Student Learning - OLC

Online Discussion Boards: Strategies to Ease Instructor Burden and Promote Student Learning - OLC | Online Teaching & Learning | Scoop.it
Because of mandated institutional engagement expectations, the discussion boards may take up the bulk of an online instructor’s time. To help alleviate discussion board burn-out, here are some strategies that can be used to promote student learning while reducing instructor workload:
 
In effort to engage students, discussion boards can take up much of an online instructor’s time. To help alleviate discussion board burn-out, here are some strategies that can be used to promote student learning while reducing instructor workload.
 
 

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NancyEvans@ATS-LU's insight:

These "tricks of the trade" will help any online instructor manage their time while improving student learning.

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Miloš Bajčetić's curator insight, March 30, 2016 1:55 AM

These "tricks of the trade" will help any online instructor manage their time while improving student learning.

Daniel Jäggli's curator insight, March 30, 2016 4:49 AM

These "tricks of the trade" will help any online instructor manage their time while improving student learning.

Claire Brooks's curator insight, March 30, 2016 6:28 PM

These "tricks of the trade" will help any online instructor manage their time while improving student learning.

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Two Excellent Apps to Turn Your iPad into A Presentation Remote ~ Educational Technology and Mobile Learning

Two Excellent Apps to Turn Your iPad into A Presentation Remote ~ Educational Technology and Mobile Learning | Online Teaching & Learning | Scoop.it

There are different ways  to remotely control your presentations through iPad. For instance you can use one of the wireless mirroring apps to display your iPad screen on a projector while playing your presentation on the connected iPad. There are also two other reliable apps that allow you to use your iPad or iPhone as a presentation remote or clicker. These are Prezi (clicker) and keynote Remote.


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Guest Post: A Learning Hub in a Refugee Camp? University of Geneva Professor Barbara Moser-Mercer's Experience

Guest Post: A Learning Hub in a Refugee Camp? University of Geneva Professor Barbara Moser-Mercer's Experience | Online Teaching & Learning | Scoop.it
Imagine your job is to deliver humanitarian aid to a single refugee camp where your recipients speak Dinka (from South central Sudan), Moro or Tira (from the Nuba mountain region), or Tigré or...
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So it's not just for people already connected and with degrees

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The Big List of Class Discussion Strategies - Cult of Pedagogy

The Big List of Class Discussion Strategies - Cult of Pedagogy | Online Teaching & Learning | Scoop.it
When I worked with student teachers on developing effective lesson plans, one thing I always asked them to revise was the phrase “We will discuss.”

We will discuss the video.

We will discuss the story.

We will discuss our results.

Every time I saw it in a lesson plan, I would add a  note: “What format will you use? What questions will you ask? How will you ensure that all students participate?” I was pretty sure that We will discuss actually meant the teacher would do most of the talking; He would throw out a couple of questions like “So what did you think about the video?” or “What was the theme of the story?” and a few students would respond, resulting in something that looked  like a discussion, but was ultimately just a conversation between the teacher and a handful of extroverted students; a classic case of Fisheye Teaching.

The problem wasn’t them; in most of the classrooms where they’d sat as students, that’s exactly what a class discussion looked like. They didn’t know any other “formats.” I have only ever been familiar with a few myself. But when teachers began contacting me recently asking for a more comprehensive list, I knew it was time to do some serious research.

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An excellent guide to student-focused discussions and pedagogy

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Victor Ventura's curator insight, February 22, 2016 12:57 PM

Discussion is required for learning in every level of classrooms. This article offers both  high level planning and low level planning. Well worth the time to read this.

Susan Wegmann's curator insight, April 22, 2016 12:20 PM
Genuine class discussions -- singing my song!
Ainsley Ballinger's curator insight, May 2, 2016 12:02 AM

Great ideas to promote in-class discussion. Will be referring to when creating lesson plans for my placement. 

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Creating a Sense of Instructor Presence in the Online Classroom

Creating a Sense of Instructor Presence in the Online Classroom | Online Teaching & Learning | Scoop.it
Creating a Sense of Instructor Presence in the Online Classroom. Posted on January 15, 2014 by Colin Stapp · instructor presence. To read more on this visit the Faculty Focus website ...

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These dimensions of "presence" are applicable to hybrid and online professors.

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Amanda Carpenter's curator insight, July 23, 2014 3:18 PM

Good article giving a major reason students feel instructor presence is essential in an online learning environment.

Dennis T OConnor's curator insight, October 4, 2015 3:32 PM

When you are teaching online you must know how to make your presence known to the students.   They must know you are there and you care!  This article runs down the basics.

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The World of Widgets - An Important Step towards a Personalised Learning Environment

The learning environment of the future must be more individualised and personalised - for years this is one of the international demands in the field of Technology Enhanced Learning (TEL) and teaching. Since fall 2010 Graz University of Technology provides a Personal Learning Environment (PLE) based on mashup of widgets connecting various web applications. The publication aims to give a first demonstration of the way these PLE widgets can be converted to run on all commondesktop Operating Systems (OS) to increase the range for individualisation of learning activities. After a short introduction we present an overview about the possibilities of the PLE-converter, discuss the working prototype and conclude withan answer to the question of an online framework for the widgets as well as desktopvariants for usual operating systems.


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mcgarcia's comment, July 25, 2011 5:55 PM
Hello Paul,
Widgets are going to play a key role in "instantiating" the future PLE. They need to allow users both to connect tand share the knowledge.
This is what I explain in this Mahara's view:
http://mahara.org/view/view.php?id=38340
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Online Schools Guidebook: Learning Online for K-12 & College Students

Online Schools Guidebook: Learning Online for K-12 & College Students | Online Teaching & Learning | Scoop.it
Explore online schools for K-12 and college students. Hear from experts and learn about Khan Academy, MIT OpenCourseWare, and other ways students can get ahead online.
NancyEvans@ATS-LU's insight:

How to determine a good online school and whether you or your students are ready to learn online.

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Blended and Online Assessment Taxonomy Design

Blended and Online Assessment Taxonomy Design | Online Teaching & Learning | Scoop.it
Are you planning and communicating your feedback criteria? Here is our Blended and Online Assessment Taxonomy Design, an infographic to help you plan better assessments.

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Allan Shaw's curator insight, April 26, 2015 6:18 PM

'In the infographic, Blended and Online Assessment Taxonomy, we have organized types of activities that suit various levels of assessments (2001) starting with remember, understand, and apply in the first row. The second row of our infographic includes higher levels of active learning including analyze, evaluate, and create. Engaging curriculum whether face-to-face, blended, or online push student performances to these levels of learning; however, these assessments are less conducive to automated feedback systems as rubrics typically require intelligent judgment. The appropriate level of learning for any assessment should be determined by the learning objective(s).' - This is worthy of your time and reflection.

Georgia Heffernan's curator insight, April 26, 2015 7:43 PM

To enable our students to become assessment literate, teachers need to align their assessment feedback practices with the purpose of the learning. This info graphic provides an easy to use guide based on Bloom's taxonomy of developmental learning - a good reminder to be deliberate!

Gary Stanyard's curator insight, April 29, 2015 5:56 PM

Useful infographic

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2014 Online College Students: Comprehensive Data on Demands and Preferences


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Dennis T OConnor's curator insight, October 4, 2014 3:07 PM

Clinefelter, D. L. & Aslanian, C. B., (2014). Onlinecollege students 2014: Comprehensive data on demands andpreferences. Louisville, KY: The Learning House, Inc.

Carlos Rodrigues Cadre's curator insight, October 9, 2014 8:13 AM

adicionar a sua visão ...

Steve Vaitl's curator insight, October 9, 2014 11:35 AM

Very interesting look at where online education is heading based on student preferences.

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e-Jobs: Online Adjunct Faculty - Psychology

e-Jobs: Online Adjunct Faculty - Psychology | Online Teaching & Learning | Scoop.it
Saints Joseph’s College has an opening for a part-time adjunct faculty member to teach one or more online undergraduate Psychology courses. An earned Master’s degree (or higher) in Psychology, as well as at least 5+ years of teaching experience are required for this position. A Ph. D. in the field is preferred. Candidates should also possess experience with college-level teaching, curriculum development, online instruction, and they should have some familiarity with learning management systems.

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Dennis T OConnor's curator insight, October 17, 2016 10:37 AM

This is a 12 month contract position. Put your Ph.D to work!

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5 Mistakes in Using Videos for eLearning Courses Infographic - e-Learning Infographics

5 Mistakes in Using Videos for eLearning Courses Infographic - e-Learning Infographics | Online Teaching & Learning | Scoop.it
The 5 Mistakes in Using Video for eLearning Courses Infographic presents five mistakes you should avoid when utilizing videos for your curriculum.

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Dennis T OConnor's curator insight, October 25, 2016 10:45 AM

Short, on point course videos work.  However, there are some basic mistakes to avoid. This infographic informs succinctly.

Ricard Garcia's curator insight, October 26, 2016 2:26 AM
5 mistakes many of us have made... good idea to have them together as a reminder :-)
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Is Design Thinking the same as “making”?

Is Design Thinking the same as “making”? | Online Teaching & Learning | Scoop.it
People often ask me two questions about Design Thinking. First, is the same as making, and second, do I like it. It’s obvious there are similarities and overlaps, and similar ways that they can be implemented well (or not so well). I think design is the key to modern STEM education, but it’s a mistake to think that using Design Thinking methodology is the same as teaching design. Design Thinking gets the “big D, big T” treatment because it’s a methodology invented at the Institute of Design at Stanford University (also known as the d.school) with assistance from ideo, a product design and consulting company.

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I
Interesting explanation of the overlap of "making" and design thinking, esp. in STEM.
 
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Joan Sutherland's curator insight, May 3, 2016 3:47 AM
Share your insight
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Student Engagement Strategies for the Online Learning Environment

Student Engagement Strategies for the Online Learning Environment | Online Teaching & Learning | Scoop.it
Our faculty development unit gathered data from students about how engaged they felt in their online courses.Their comments helped inform our teaching. 

Our faculty development unit gathered data from students about how engaged they felt in their online courses.Their comments helped inform our teaching. 

 

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Luciana Viter's curator insight, March 21, 2016 6:35 AM

We teach best practices for online teaching in our Graduate Certificate Program at UW-Stout. This article gives you a give overview of those practices.

Alexandria Yaxley's curator insight, March 22, 2016 4:44 AM

We teach best practices for online teaching in our Graduate Certificate Program at UW-Stout. This article gives you a give overview of those practices.

Stewart-Marshall's curator insight, March 23, 2016 7:47 AM

This article gives you an overview of the online teaching practices on the Graduate Certificate Program at UW-Stout.

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How To Find Openly Licensed Educational Resources You Can Use [Infographic]

How To Find Openly Licensed Educational Resources You Can Use [Infographic] | Online Teaching & Learning | Scoop.it
Open Educational Resources (OER)How many of these Internet resources can you legally use for free? How many of them can you adapt?

This Open Educational Resources (OER) inforgraphic helps determine which Internet resources you can use or adapt for free -- from the Center for Open Educational Resources and Language Learning (at the University of Texas at Austin).

 

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NancyEvans@ATS-LU's insight:

OER is a powerful concept.  Help yourself and your students by grabbing this concept with both hands. 

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Dean Mantz's curator insight, February 18, 2015 11:15 AM

Thanks to @Dennis T OConnor for sharing this infographic on finding and identifying open source education resources.  

Iolanda Bueno de Camargo Cortelazzo's curator insight, February 19, 2015 12:00 PM

Bastante úteis estas informações para professores e gestores educacionais.

NancyEvans@ATS-LU's curator insight, March 30, 2016 9:14 AM

OER is a powerful concept.  Help yourself and your students by grabbing this concept with both hands. 

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Instructional Designers: Instead of Saying “No” to Faculty, Let’s Say “Yes”

Instructional Designers: Instead of Saying “No” to Faculty, Let’s Say “Yes” | Online Teaching & Learning | Scoop.it
From a faculty support standpoint, "No" is not the answer if you want to help faculty change how they teach or to teach online.  Listen, be flexible, compromise, make adjustments. From Carolyn Speer Schmidt (Wichita State U.) and WCET
 
From a faculty support standpoint, "No" is not the answer if you want to help faculty change how they teach or to teach online.  Listen, be flexible, compromise, make adjustments. From Carolyn Speer Schmidt (Wichita State U.) and WCET
 
 
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105 Free Moodle Video Tutorials

105 Free Moodle Video Tutorials | Online Teaching & Learning | Scoop.it
105 Free Moodle Video Tutorials! We know that you love Moodle. This is why we created the following list. Show your appreciation and share it with people interested in Moodle.

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3 Minute Teaching With Technology Tutorials

3 Minute Teaching With Technology Tutorials | Online Teaching & Learning | Scoop.it
Check out these great, brief videos that offer quick introductions to getting started with numerous different tech tools and resources for teaching and

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Beth Dichter's curator insight, June 29, 2014 10:18 PM

Summertime...a time to recharge and to think about what we might do in our classrooms next year (at least for the folks who are now out of school). Have you been considering learning some new tech tools? This website is a great place to start. They have short tutorials on nine "emerging tech tools" and more will be added. The tutorials include:

* Create a Flipped Lesson with TedEd

* Easily Create Private Digital Online Content Discussions with Tackk

* Using Movenote to Create Custom Video Lessons

* Create Powerful Lessons in Minutes with Blendspace

* Remind 101 - A Free Tool for Text Messaging Students

Two more tools are available and you might want to bookmark this site as they will continue to add new tools as they become available.

Jan MacWatters's curator insight, June 30, 2014 2:33 PM

Good to review

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Sharp online student has smart advice for Blended Teachers

Sharp online student has smart advice for Blended Teachers | Online Teaching & Learning | Scoop.it

Editors' Note: We asked San Jose high school sophomore Audrey Mullen to share how she and her peers actually use various edtech tools and how they really feel about their teachers’ blended learning approaches. The result is a straight-from-the-source playbook.


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This insightful student says a lot about facilitating a blended class.

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Gary Harwell's curator insight, October 6, 2015 5:39 AM

Well worth reading....

Rosemary Tyrrell, Ed.D.'s curator insight, October 6, 2015 1:40 PM

I don't like the snide tone of this article, but the advice is dead on! 

Ricard Garcia's curator insight, October 7, 2015 6:57 AM

Extremely realistic, and honestly useful for us teachers!!!!

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A Plea for Pedagogy | Online Learning | HYBRID PEDAGOGY

A Plea for Pedagogy | Online Learning | HYBRID PEDAGOGY | Online Teaching & Learning | Scoop.it

A Plea for PedagogyAugust 07, 2013 | Filed in: Online Learningby Matthew J. Kruger-Ross



It goes without saying that technology is changing education. Children’s brains are being rewired, universities are being threatened with extinction, and we will be in serious trouble if we ignore the transformative power of new technologies. We live in an information/knowledge economy where we are constantly connected to networks of information, our experiences become more and more mediated. It seems that technology changes everything, including education.

Or does it? It seems to me that so-called innovations attributed to technology in teaching and learning are mostly pedagogical strategies cloaked in digital media. Specifically, current trendy approaches that proclaim the transformative power of technology in education are really no more than misunderstandings. The term “approaches” I use liberally. Some practitioners would prefer their perspective of choice to be labeled a program, theory, or framework. This in itself is interesting, but beyond the scope of these reflections. If educational technology rhetoric is misleading, what lies beneath the language of innovation?

When we discuss the history of educational technology, we often begin in the 1950s-1960s with the entrance of computer technology. The first experiment with education and computers was called Computer Aided Instruction (CAI) and consisted of a learner seated in front of a dumb terminal. The basic computing program presented piecemeal bits of information to the learner. After, the learner was asked to complete a number of questions written specifically to determine if she had learned the content. Because of the limitations of programming languages and computer capacity, in addition to the engineers’ simplified understanding of teaching and learning, CAI redefined learning as driven by clear and concise objectives that could be easily quantified and measured (see Hamilton & Feenberg, 2012). CAI initiated a trajectory of integrating computer technology into education that continues at present with only minor changes in language.

Most learning models that claim to theorize and explain learning mediated by technology are built on the assumptions that were translated into the CAI model. These assumptions about teaching and learning were then subsequently adopted by educational psychologists in their analysis and evaluation of the effects of technology on educating. Beginning with Gagne’s objectives and conditions of learning, to the ADDIE model for instructional design and continuing to current cries for Universal Design for Learning, each reproduces a limited understanding of teaching and learning. Richard Mayer’s work on multimedia learning brings cognitive science and multimedia studies together in describing learning within a behaviorist framework, and, ironically, not terribly more advanced than the original CAI input/output system. While the pictures on the screen may move, the “instructional modules” remain grounded in the same “instructional principles” as the earlier approaches.

A number of contemporary approaches currently in vogue with educational technologists and teachers who unquestioningly embrace technologies quickly unravel as soon as the underlying assumptions are examined. The integration and inclusion of technologies into educational contexts is not predetermined or destined to follow a specific trajectory. Technological determinism is at best a common misunderstanding and at worst an enormous blindspot within recent conversations about education reform. Perhaps this is one of the reasons educational technology lacks a true understanding of the influence of pedagogy in educating. In the brief description of the history of educational technology above it should be clear that the assumptions made about teaching and learning are widely disputed by most teachers. What I find intriguing is the interest in the four approaches below, and how they have been embraced without a true understanding of the pedagogy supporting the approach.

Distance vs. Online Learning
Distance learning as an approach to educating via technology has fallen out of favour in research literature. It is much more common to speak of online learning, or learning that is housed and functions online via a mediating system such as a learning/content management system. There are debates among scholars as to whether we should be speaking of learning or content management systems. Beyond the analytical distinction I do not see much of a difference. Unfortunately, most online learning practitioners simply imported traditional distance learning pedagogies and strategies into the online format. Simple presentation of content matter, threaded discussion forums, and built-in testing capabilities allowed for such an easy translation.

Online learning is lauded for its ability to remove barriers to learning for its participants at a distance and for students who choose this mode of education. Its anytime, anywhere format and structure allow learners to move at their own pace, completing prescribed learning modules that can be tested for mastery with the click of a button. However, pedagogically, there does not seem to be much of a difference between a student's experience in an online course housed in Moodle or Blackboard as compared to distance learner who receives course notes, correspondence and audio/video tapes/multimedia in the mail. Granted, discussion forums built into every LMS encourage and support student interaction and relationships between students and instructors; but, student experience and educational research provides a rather dismal appreciation of discussion forums on the part of learners.

It seems that other than the reduction of time, online learning hasn’t done much to update the pedagogical principles offered by distance-based courses that began for adult learners in the mid-1800s. Furthermore, distance-based pedagogical strategies are little more than traditional face-to-face methods reformatted to accommodate learners who are not physically located in the same town or community.

MOOCS
Another recent approach to teaching with technology are MOOCs, or Massively Open Online Courses. MOOCs were first developed and envisioned back in the mid-2000s by Canadian scholars Dave Cormier, Stephen Downes, and George Siemens. In their original intent, MOOCs were an interesting approach to online learning built on a foundation of open source philosophy. However, it is the growing interest that Ivy League American schools such as Stanford and MIT have started to have in MOOCs and their singular understanding and conceptualization that has drawn much of the recent media hype and critique.

Since much has been shared regarding MOOCs, I will only briefly frame my own understanding of this model. The original model of a MOOC was based around sharing and reflecting as a community of connected learners. A general theme would be identified by the organizers of the MOOC and a weekly schedule would then be worked out by the future/existing participants. But more recently MOOCs have drifted from their original intent. Companies such as Coursera and edX have been created to employ professors to develop courses traditionally understood as disciplinary introductions (e.g. Biology 101, Chemistry 101). Discussions around what this model means for higher education and universities are full of hype, worthwhile, ongoing, and uncertain.

Pedagogically, however, most MOOCs do not advance beyond commonly understood teaching and learning practices and may, in fact, not be able to replicate some of the best aspects of distance education as it has traditionally been practiced. Instruction in more recent models of MOOCs still includes students watching lectures of professors with subject interest/expertise, discussing questions with peers, writing reflections, and participating in computer-based testing (multiple choice, true/false questions). Peer into any local university classroom and, with the exception of the computer-based testing, you would likely see the same activities. Most of the strategies could be facilitated without technology.

There is one wild card technologically -- Twitter -- that supports MOOCs and may open additional possibilities for technologically-mediated instruction. Yet, even Twitter is commonly not utilized how it might be in a pedagogically-sound way. There is a great TED Talk given by one of the founders of Twitter where he talks about how the technology was used to share updated information to homeowners who were in the “line of fire” during the California wildfires in the mid- to late-2000s. I have yet to see a scenario where one person’s tweet might impact the education of millions of people as the messages did in the wildfire scenario. But I do remain hopeful.

Communities of Practice & the Interaction Equivalency Theorem
Terry Anderson, an early scholar in digital technology and education, is commonly associated with the phrase community of practice. Communities of practice (CoP) are groups of people who actively work together towards or for a common purpose. Ideally this purpose involves some sort of professional practice and in the group process members would participate in ongoing, active reflection with each other. I am still unsure why we needed such a specific definition, even though I have collaborated on writings that directly draw on this theoretical model of online learning. While some would disagree, I tend to associate Community of Inquiry practitioners with CoP supporters, the only difference being that one community gathers to reflect on practice and the other gathers around inquiry. More recently, a student and colleague of Anderson’s has shifted to using the terminology Interaction Equivalency Theorem that, as far as I can tell, means that there is a relation that exists between the teacher, the learner, and the to-be-learned. Both approaches were specifically developed to address online teaching and learning in the early 2000s, prior to the Web 2.0 and web-based technologies movement. However, by setting aside the technologies involved, these models claim that learning online is usually more effective when it is based in interactivity. Pedagogically, this is obvious and does not call for the use of technology. While these approaches are helpful in one sense -- as a model for learning possibly -- they do not necessarily depend on technology to innovate or transform basic pedagogical practice.

Networked learning: Connectivism and Rhizomatic approaches
While the connectivism and rhizomatic learning approaches evolved from differing sources, they both build on an idea of “networking” that is borrowed from information and communication technologies. Interestingly enough, both approaches are actually theories of knowledge and knowing. As such, neither model necessarily requires technical mediation. Connectivism claims that knowing and knowledge should be understood as networked connections. Rhizomatic learning aims to build on connectivism and social constructivism to focus on the negotiated understanding of knowledge to the online world. While the assumption behind connectivism is interesting and may be useful for discussion, it seems to be able to stand just as a point of discussion rather than a revolution in teaching and learning demanded by technology. Rhizomatic learning as well seems like a fruitful analogy for exploring the nature of knowing and, quite frankly, we could use some models and theories to help us talk about and grasp whether or not knowing is really transformed in a world where technological speed and efficiency seems to be the name of the game. But still, are these two approaches dependent on technology? Or are they simply new ways of thinking about knowing?

The four approaches above were founded on assumptions made decades ago by CAI researchers. While there does exist an alternative history to the development of teaching and learning with technology based in building community (see Hamilton & Feenberg, 2012), this trajectory is largely ignored and overshadowed by the current hype surrounding Web 2.0 and other web-based technologies. Yet, even within this underrepresented perspective to educating with technology it would appear that pedagogy remains underdeveloped and underutilized. These ideas and reflections do not rule out the possibility of the ability of technology to transform human experience, understanding, and so on. However, they do attempt to reverse much of the rhetoric surrounding the influences of technology as they are currently understood and experienced while leaving space for the potential of truly interesting and innovative pedagogical strategies that might be enhanced via communication technologies.

The influence of computers and our understanding of human perception, cognition, and memory, is easy to see in our language. We speak of needing to reset our brains, of our memories being full, our inability to process information or see the connections. Cognitive Science and the related discipline of Artificial Intelligence assures us that we will one day be able to create computers that are able to mimic our own brains. Regardless of the feasibility or ethical questions raised along such a trajectory, the metaphor of computer networking has been integrated into the language of teaching and learning. Kids are already wired and they are already online. We speak of linking to previous learning. While these phrases might already be part of our vernacular, the discourse and rhetoric surrounding, describing, explaining, and analyzing education and technology, to say the least, lacks clarity and precision.

 


Via Lynnette Van Dyke
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20 Facts About the Impact of E-Learning [#Infographic]

20 Facts About the Impact of E-Learning [#Infographic] | Online Teaching & Learning | Scoop.it
Online learning has become one of the fastest-growing industries in education technology, and it’s not slowing down anytime soon.

The availability of mobile devices on campuses has drastically changed the playing field for e-learning. By 2020, the global mobile-learning market is on track to reach $37.8 billion, according to a new infographic from TalentLMS, a learning management system. By 2019, half of all college students will be enrolled in online courses.

Via Dennis T OConnor
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Dennis T OConnor's curator insight, May 20, 2015 3:38 PM

The future is bright and filled with change. Are you ready?

Wendy Zaruba's curator insight, May 22, 2015 2:55 PM

Very interesting facts regarding E-Learning and what we can all learn.

Carlos Godoy Rodríguez's curator insight, May 22, 2015 7:25 PM

Cifras claras que evidencian el avance del eLearning frente a los métodos tradicionales de distribucion del aprendizaje. Definitivamente, todos los que trabajamos en docencia tenemos que abordar este tren los antes posible.

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5 best iPad apps for team collaboration and brainstorming - TabTimes

5 best iPad apps for team collaboration and brainstorming - TabTimes | Online Teaching & Learning | Scoop.it
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NancyEvans@ATS-LU's insight:

Ideas to create interactivity with students working in groups

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