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Prevalence of eating disorders in elite ath... [Clin J Sport Med. 2004] - PubMed - NCBI

PubMed comprises more than 23 million citations for biomedical literature from MEDLINE, life science journals, and online books. Citations may include links to full-text content from PubMed Central and publisher web sites.
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When Trying to Be Positive Brings You Down

When Trying to Be Positive Brings You Down | Counselling & Psychotherapy | Scoop.it
It’s only when we can be truly honest with ourselves about how we feel that we will be able to find the positive lesson, heal, and move on.

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BBC - Newsbeat - Care for people who self-harm 'must be improved'

BBC - Newsbeat - Care for people who self-harm 'must be improved' | Counselling & Psychotherapy | Scoop.it
A health watchdog says care for people who self-harm isn't good enough. ("People who self-harm should get the same respect, dignity and compassion as anyone else that comes into hospital".

Via in-recovery.com
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Eating Disorders Symptoms and Signs

List of eating disorder symptoms for anorexia, bulimia and compulsive overeating. Signs of eating disorders include fatigue, mood swings, severe self-criticism, focus on weight..... Getting help.
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CBT vs MBCBT- What is the Difference?

CBT vs MBCBT- What is the Difference? | Counselling & Psychotherapy | Scoop.it

"...Mindfulness is a mental state and therapeutic technique attained by purposefully focusing your awareness on the present moment, while calmly and without judgement acknowledging your feelings, thoughts, and bodily sensations. 


The concept of mindfulness is quite ancient, and part of Buddhist and other Eastern spiritual teachings which believe that a calm awareness of one’s body, feelings, and mind is an important part of the road to self actualisation.

 

Mindfulness was taken and developed in the 1970s as a psychological tool to manage anxiety, stress and chronic pain by Dr. Jon Kabat-Zinn, who then set up a Stress Reduction Clinic at the University of Massachusetts Medical School to teach its principles. Now mindfulness is a scientifically researched phenomenon recognised by the world’s leading doctors, scientists, and psychologists. In the 1990s it was further developed specifically to help depression.

 

Mindfulness has proved itself so useful as it helps combat the ‘auto-pilot’ it is so easy to live a busy modern life from. We eat an entire bag of pretzels without realising it until we reach into the bag and find it empty, or walk all the way to a destination before realising we haven’t noticed a single thing we’ve walked by. Why does this matter when it comes to depression? If we live our life in a spaced out way we are living life with our unconscious running the show, which leaves room for anxiety to take over.

 

And  if we are distracted, challenges can take us unawares and we respond reactively, flying off the handle or saying something we regret. If we have present moment awareness we can be calmer and respond with consideration. Mindfulness helps us consider our actions and respond in thoughtful ways. And it helps us consciously choose what environments, people, and thoughts to be affected by, too.

 

In summary mindfulness creates room for us to make clearer choices, feel more in control of our lives, be calmer and make healthy decisions, and ultimately find more joy by noticing the positive details of our lives and relationships..."

 

[click on the title for the full article]

 

 


Via Dimitris Tsantaris, Andrea Koenigstorfer
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What Anxiety Does to Your Brain and What You Can Do About It

What Anxiety Does to Your Brain and What You Can Do About It | Counselling & Psychotherapy | Scoop.it

"...Many people have lived in an anxious state for so long that they don’t know any other feeling so they are unaware that they are suffering from persistent anxiety. Recognizing anxiety isn’t easy in these types of situations however identifying its red flags is a good way to start. Are you pessimistic about the most innocuous situations to the point where it keeps you from taking risks? Do you find your mind racing to what possible negative outcomes there could be? Do you immediately attribute some external circumstance to a positive outcome that could be seen as the result of your efforts? If your answer is ‘yes’ to these questions, then you may suffer from persistent anxiety.

For some people, anxiety is situational. It’s normal to feel nervous at the prospect of having to speak in public. It’s not normal to feel anxiety about having a mundane conversation with your barista. Situational anxiety is one of those things that we can only overcome by confronting it. Generalized anxiety is something that can only be coped with by trying to rewrite the pattern of thinking that elicits it...."

 

[click on the title for the full article]

 

 


Via Dimitris Tsantaris
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Lisa A Romano's curator insight, January 4, 2014 5:13 AM

Such a clear and succinct article: written from the eidence base and offering a reader the rght information to make a 'bio-feedback' informed choice on the journey to ameliorating anxiety.

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Project Wellness: Making Your Eating Disorder Recovery Work - Huffington Post

Project Wellness: Making Your Eating Disorder Recovery Work - Huffington Post | Counselling & Psychotherapy | Scoop.it
Project Wellness: Making Your Eating Disorder Recovery Work
Huffington Post
This is a question commonly asked by those struggling with eating disorders, trying to fashion their future.
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When You’re In Transition: Being Patient and Accepting Uncertainty

When You’re In Transition: Being Patient and Accepting Uncertainty | Counselling & Psychotherapy | Scoop.it
Transitions come with uncertainty, but if we rush to have everything figured out, we make a choice that's not right for us.

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Julianna Bonola's curator insight, January 28, 2014 6:26 PM

Transitions come in all shapes and sizes.  When we are faced with a reality check that leads us into a long transitional period, staying centred is difficult.  I recall my last major tranisitory period.  Life looked so bleake - no money, lots of bills and no one close enough to share what I was going through.  I just kept reminding myself that it was my choice to be where I was, and that time would pass and I would get through the subsequent changes.  I reminded myself of this every day until one day, I realised that I didn't need to remind myself that it was my choice,to feel okay about where I was.  It was around that time also, that the fogg lifted and I could see a future ahead of me.  Over time, I learned that change doesn't have to be scarry, it will always be there and there's no point in being afraid of it, because being afraid doesn't help.  In fact, being afraid makes it worse.  Relaxing into transition and being kind and gentle with yourself is the easiest and fastest way through any transition.  It can be done!  I'm living proof.  And, if I can do it, anyone can do it.

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Encouraging Patients to Change Unhealthy Behaviors With Motivational Interviewing - Family Practice Management

Encouraging Patients to Change Unhealthy Behaviors With Motivational Interviewing - Family Practice Management | Counselling & Psychotherapy | Scoop.it
The article explains the concept of motivational interviewing, a validated method to generate patient engagement and activation and involve them in setting their own health goals and agendas.
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A Pilot Study of Motivational Interviewing Training in a Virtual World

A Pilot Study of Motivational Interviewing Training in a Virtual World (A Pilot Study of Motivational Interviewing Training in a Virtual World
Suzanne Mitchell, MD, MS, @rheyden et al
http://t.co/fmTdiVFC0r)...
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Repetitive Relationship Patterns

Repetitive Relationship Patterns | Counselling & Psychotherapy | Scoop.it

"..." A repetition compulsion is a neurotic defense mechanism. Here's how it works: The repetition compulsion is an attempt to rewrite history. The history we try to rewrite is typically the troubled relationship with our parents, particularly the opposite sex parent. When the early parental relationship is fraught with frustration, disappointment, rejection, abandonment, neglect or abuse, the child is in a precarious spot psychologically. In order to survive these narcissistic insults, children must deny the reality of their predicament, as well as their intense anger, depression and despair. Instead, we cling to hope: childish hope that, if only we can be good, perfect, smart, quiet, funny enough, etc., that will win over mom or dad and they will finally love us as we need them to--as we are, unconditionally. The child mistakenly believes the problem with the parental interaction resides with them--an archetypal developmental misinterpretation--and that, therefore, they have the power to control and rectify it by changing into someone more acceptable. And so we try desperately to do so, over and over again, but to no avail. Because the reality is, the problem lies not with the child, but with the parent, who, because of his or her own psychological or situational limitations, is unable or unwilling to provide the love, structure and acceptance all children require to thrive--and deserve.

[...]

Our "inner child" is still active, and still seeking to turn the rejecting or ambivalent or emotionally unavailable or abusive adult into a loving one. Only now, it is no longer only the parent of the opposite sex, but potential love interests of the opposite sex that are targeted. Symbolic stand-ins for the parent. Most adults have an uncanny attraction, a kind ofunconscious "radar," for members of the opposite sex (or, in some cases, same sex) who, in ways often initially imperceptible, resemble--psychologically if not physically--the parent with whom we had difficulties. And these are the people we tend to "fall in love" with or with whom we get involved. We choose them unconsciously, of course. That is the nature of a neurosis. It's a "blind spot." Who would consciously choose---and often remain--with a partner who is rejecting, unavailable, or emotionally/physically abusive? That would be pure masochism. But it is not mere masochism in this case. It is a powerful repetition compulsion at play..

That wounded, rejected, abandoned little boy or girl is still trying to win mommy or daddy's love..."

[click on the title for the full article]

 

 


Via Dimitris Tsantaris
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Belkacem Nabout's curator insight, November 29, 2013 3:33 AM

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qui viennent de sources différentes.
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Belkacem Nabout's curator insight, December 4, 2013 3:47 PM

TOUT EST GRATUIT mon ami sinon je je n'y serais pas lol !
http://www.globallshare.com/fr/1200655.html

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CBT vs MBCBT- What is the Difference?

CBT vs MBCBT- What is the Difference? | Counselling & Psychotherapy | Scoop.it

"...Mindfulness is a mental state and therapeutic technique attained by purposefully focusing your awareness on the present moment, while calmly and without judgement acknowledging your feelings, thoughts, and bodily sensations. 


The concept of mindfulness is quite ancient, and part of Buddhist and other Eastern spiritual teachings which believe that a calm awareness of one’s body, feelings, and mind is an important part of the road to self actualisation.

 

Mindfulness was taken and developed in the 1970s as a psychological tool to manage anxiety, stress and chronic pain by Dr. Jon Kabat-Zinn, who then set up a Stress Reduction Clinic at the University of Massachusetts Medical School to teach its principles. Now mindfulness is a scientifically researched phenomenon recognised by the world’s leading doctors, scientists, and psychologists. In the 1990s it was further developed specifically to help depression.

 

Mindfulness has proved itself so useful as it helps combat the ‘auto-pilot’ it is so easy to live a busy modern life from. We eat an entire bag of pretzels without realising it until we reach into the bag and find it empty, or walk all the way to a destination before realising we haven’t noticed a single thing we’ve walked by. Why does this matter when it comes to depression? If we live our life in a spaced out way we are living life with our unconscious running the show, which leaves room for anxiety to take over.

 

And  if we are distracted, challenges can take us unawares and we respond reactively, flying off the handle or saying something we regret. If we have present moment awareness we can be calmer and respond with consideration. Mindfulness helps us consider our actions and respond in thoughtful ways. And it helps us consciously choose what environments, people, and thoughts to be affected by, too.

 

In summary mindfulness creates room for us to make clearer choices, feel more in control of our lives, be calmer and make healthy decisions, and ultimately find more joy by noticing the positive details of our lives and relationships..."

 

[click on the title for the full article]

 

 


Via Dimitris Tsantaris
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