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Defining Moments For Therapists

Defining Moments For Therapists | Counselling Update | Scoop.it
If therapy is a relational process, it takes a person on the therapist's end. The goal of the project is to capture the therapist's evolving sense of self as it is shaped by our experiences as active participants in a creative interaction.

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Free e-book (pdf) to download or read online: http://lifesherpa.com/zug/books/Defining-Moments-For-Therapists.pdf ;

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Ian Townsend's curator insight, May 21, 2013 4:58 AM

Well worth looking at, folks

Counselling Update
A digest of Counselling related articles, video presentations and research findings
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Epigenetics between the generations: Researchers prove that we inherit more than just genes

Epigenetics between the generations: Researchers prove that we inherit more than just genes | Counselling Update | Scoop.it
We are more than the sum of our genes. Epigenetic mechanisms modulated by environmental cues such as diet, disease or lifestyle take a major role in regulating the DNA by switching genes on and off. It has been long debated if epigenetic modifications accumulated throughout the entire life can cross the border of generations and be inherited to children or even grand children. Now researchers from the Max Planck Institute of Immunobiology and Epigenetics in Freiburg show robust evidence that not only the inherited DNA itself but also the inherited epigenetic instructions contribute in regulating gene expression in the offspring. Moreover, the new insights by the Lab of Nicola Iovino describe for the first time biological consequences of this inherited information. The study proves that mother's epigenetic memory is essential for the development and survival of the new generation.
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Six Ways to be The Persecutory Therapist *cue the thunder and lightning*

Six Ways to be The Persecutory Therapist *cue the thunder and lightning* | Counselling Update | Scoop.it

"...it would be foolish to imagine that psychotherapy is always beneficial or helpful, even when we think some individuals really need the help. We know that therapists can and may cause, or intensify a client's sense of being attacked or persecuted. And the disturbing thing is that sometimes, just sometimes, therapists may also be cognisant of these responses as a result of their own personal issues and internal process..."

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3 Reasons Why You Fall For Emotionally Unavailable Partners

3 Reasons Why You Fall For Emotionally Unavailable Partners | Counselling Update | Scoop.it

"We are often unaware that the partners we are obsessed with are the ones that reinforce our deepest insecurities. Studies on the science of adult attachment including Paula Pietromonaco (University of Massachusetts) and Katherine Carnelly (University of Southampton – UK) found that avoidant individuals actually prefer anxiously attached people. Another study done by Jeffry Simpson of the University of Minnesota showed that anxious women are more likely to date avoidant men. This shows that our beliefs about love attract specific partners. People who fiercely guard their independence are attracted to partners who invade it. People who desire extreme closeness are attracted to people who are scared of intimacy."

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What Do Grown Children Owe Their Terrible, Abusive Parents?

What Do Grown Children Owe Their Terrible, Abusive Parents? | Counselling Update | Scoop.it

"..."It’s wonderful when there can be true reconciliation and healing, when all parties can feel the past has been somehow redeemed. But sometimes the best thing to do is just close the door."..."

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A science-backed trick to reduce fear and anxiety takes just 30 seconds and a pen

A science-backed trick to reduce fear and anxiety takes just 30 seconds and a pen | Counselling Update | Scoop.it

"Labeling the fear-inducing object appeared to reduce activity in the amygdala, the part of the brain in which the fight or flight reflex originates, and increased activity in the right ventrolateral prefrontal cortex, which is associated with vigilance and symbolic processing."

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Know thyself to understand others

Know thyself to understand others | Counselling Update | Scoop.it

"...During the three months, various methods were used to teach two groups of 80 and 81 participants, aged between 20 and 55 years, how to develop their perspective-taking skills . The training was inspired by the Internal Family Systems model which views the self as being composed of different complex inner parts or subpersonalities, each with their own defining set of behaviours, thoughts and emotions. Participants were taught to identify and classify their own inner parts. They explored how being identified with different inner parts such as their caring, managing or pleasure parts affects their everyday experiences.

The results revealed that in the course of the training, the participants effectively learned to identify prototypical inner parts such as “the inner manager” or “the inner child” in their own personalities. The degree to which participants improved their understanding of themselves – as reflected in the number of different inner parts they could identify – went hand in hand with how much participants improved in terms of their own flexibility and being able to accurately infer and understand the mental state of others. “The more negative inner parts they could identify, the better their awareness of other people’s frame of mind became thanks to the training.

“There is a close link between getting better in understanding oneself and improvement in social intelligence,” says Singer ,“In particular understanding others’ cognitive perspectives.”.."

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How to Argue in Relationships

How to Argue in Relationships | Counselling Update | Scoop.it

"...We might consider a different and slightly paradoxical approach: we might, exactly at the moment when we’ve been wounded by our partner, instead of hitting back, make what we could term A Dignified Avowal of Hurt and Fear. 


Rather than get furious, we might attempt to move register and get directly at what is ailing us through a twofold admission. We might say, firstly: I’m so hurt that someone I’ve put my emotional trust in should say or do that to me. And secondly, (this takes proper courage), we might add: I’m so frightened that I should be emotionally deeply exposed to someone who would appear to hurt me like this. 


This should give the partner pause for thought. One hasn’t insulted them or hurt them back in the usual way – which is what typically blocks their ears and sets off a vicious cycle of attack and counterattack. 


We are being dignified and honest. We aren’t lashing out, but nor are we begging. We are neither being very strong, nor very weak. We are neither punching nor crawling. We are just standing still, admitting our genuine sadness, fear and nakedness in a tone of marked self-possession. 


Too often, arguments become interminable and, to outsiders, slightly daft because both people refuse to admit that they’re sad not mean. It isn’t what time to leave for the airport or whose turn it is to do the dishes that’s created the argument. It’s that both parties are, in different ways, feeling unloved and misunderstood – but are refusing to say this in quite so many words..."

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What is the “Inner Child”? - Harley Therapy Counselling Blog

What is the “Inner Child”? - Harley Therapy Counselling Blog | Counselling Update | Scoop.it


  "...WHAT IS THE INNER CHILD?

The term inner child of course does not imply that there is a little child living inside of you, or that part of you brain is delegated solely to childish thoughts!

The general idea is that we all have a childlike aspect within our unconscious mind.  The inner child can be seen as a ‘subpersonality’, a side of your character that can take over when you are faced with a challenge. 

The inner child reflects the child we once were in both his or her ‘negative’ and ‘positive’ aspects. Both our unmet needs and suppressed childhood emotions, as well as our childlike innocence, creativity, and joy, are still waiting within of us. 

The repressed emotions would be all the things you were taught as a child not to feel if you wanted to be be loved. So if you were only offered attention when ‘good’, you might find the inner child holds rebellion, sadness, and anger. Or, if you experienced trauma or abuse, you would have learned to hide pain and fear to survive.

The inner child can also hide all of the things we were taught to think about ourselves by parents, teachers, or other adults. This can sound like, “you better not say what you really think”, ““don’t try to get that promotion you just aren’t smart enough”, “big boys don’t cry”, “sex is dirty”.

WHY IS THE INNER CHILD AN IMPORTANT CONCEPT?

The idea is that accessing your inner child allows you to find the roots of your issues as an adult, as well as discover sides of your personality you’ve denied.

Inner child work can help with the following: 

* discovering repressed emotions holding us back
* helping us recognise our unmet needs
* assisting to resolve unhelpful patterns
* offering an opportunity for increased self-care
* helping us be creative and playful
* raising self-respect..."

More on Harley Therapy Counselling Blog:

http://www.harleytherapy.co.uk/counselling/what-is-the-inner-child-and-how-can-this-concept-help-you.htm ;

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Do Mindful People Have a Stronger Sense of Self?

Do Mindful People Have a Stronger Sense of Self? | Counselling Update | Scoop.it

"...Researchers at the University of Utah recruited over 1,000 undergraduate students, ranging in age from 18 to 53, to complete questionnaires about three traits:


Mindfulness: Their tendency to be aware of their thoughts and feelings and to respond to them in deliberate, non-reactive, non-judgmental ways.


Self-concept clarity: How stable, clear, and unconflicted their views of themselves are.


Well-being: How much they feel a sense of self-acceptance, autonomy, and control over their environment; the quality of their relationships; and their experience of personal growth and purpose in life.


The results showed that more mindful students reported higher well-being—and that a stronger sense of self partly accounted for that link.


Delving deeper into the data, the researchers found that some aspects of mindfulness were more crucial than others. Students who were more non-judgmental about their thoughts and feelings tended to report a particularly clear sense of self; on the other hand, those who were better at observing the present actually had slightly lower self-concept clarity.


“Being non-judgmental may increase the likelihood of accepting the self, which may increase the willingness of more mindful individuals to explore and examine the self—ultimately, being more familiar or friendly with themselves,” explains lead author Adam W. Hanley. In other words, if we don’t expect to beat ourselves up for our flaws, we may be more willing to take a clear look in the mirror. 


(Participants skilled at observing didn’t have deeper self-knowledge, Hanley speculates, because the questions about observing focused on their ability to notice external states—everyday smells, the sun on their face—rather than internal ones.)


How might mindfulness and a strong sense of self work together to make us happier?


Besides reducing the uncertainty and conflict of self-doubt, they may also have positive benefits—by allowing us to confidently pursue the goals and relationships that are most authentically important to us. (In fact, mindfulness was recently linked to acting in line with your values.)


Also, if mindful people notice change and improvement in themselves, they can shed ingrained beliefs that are no longer true—like “I’m not successful enough” or “I’m too shy.”..."

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Demystifying The Talking Cure | The Counsellors Cafe

Demystifying The Talking Cure | The Counsellors Cafe | Counselling Update | Scoop.it

"... [T]he school of thought a therapist works from is less important than the quality of relationship that the therapist provides for the client. This is about a presence over any theory. And it is a crucial integrity rooted in a wish to help people in distress, people suffering somehow, unfulfilled or confused, inhibited or stuck, depressed or anxious, sometimes suicidal, people maddened somehow because of the circumstances of their lives.

Therapists provide a welcoming place for all of these experiences. The great, now sadly late, John Berger describes the concept of hospitality as something which is “an incredible human capacity. And the first rule of hospitality is to accept the presence of somebody”. Startling in its simplicity, yet rarer than we might first imagine, this is a quality integral to the work of any attentive therapist..."

...

This form of attention paid by the therapist to the person’s experiences is very particular to the profession. It scarcely happens outside the therapy room. The French philosopher Simone Weil once wrote that “attention is the rarest and purest form of generosity”. By this definition, our relationships to the world, to one another and to ourselves, are becoming increasingly miserly. More than ever in the modern world, we have the experience of being constantly interrupted. Often we distract ourselves – the same person as the interruptor and the interrupted.
 
With a therapist however, gaps are left alone. And again and again, the therapist will witness the same spaces that are usually taken up by interruptions outside the therapy room – when left alone by the therapist – will result in clients talking about themselves and their experiences in surprising ways and will connect to new ways of thinking and feeling. Different narratives and conversations emerge, and with them new possibilities.
 
 When a person in distress can sit with a therapist who is experienced in being with such discomfort, and is capable of staying with it, someone who is trained at carefully listening and sensitively responding to such sorrow, the anxiety often lessens. After taking in and reflecting on the client’s story, the therapist will look to offer something about the patient’s experience that the client may not have thought about themselves. Over time for the client, the hope is that the intensity of their symptoms will reduce and along with that the temptation to act out in ways that are self-destructive or destructive to others will also diminish.
 
 And beyond symptom remission, many therapies will hope to facilitate within the client the presence of strengthened psychological capacities and resources. This could mean more fulfilling relationships, a greater toleration of a wider range of affect, more effective use of talents and abilities or a more robust or grounded sense of one’s self. All of which may contribute to a life more fully lived. Most therapists would look to foster these capacities in their clients..."

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The Importance of Empathy

Trying to understand other people’s experiences and perspectives is what we call empathy. There are, of course, the subconscious empathetic reflexes that we all experience without thinking—e.g., you might wince when you see someone get hurt—but to be truly empathetic, you need actively think about the concerns of others. This video by Devin Clark explores the importance of empathy and what you can do to improve your own.

Read more: lifehac.kr/C2ePfNa

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RebeccaMoore's curator insight, February 5, 5:26 PM
This three-and-a-half minute video is mostly geared towards adults, but could be used for younger students to illustrate why and how to be more empathetic towards others, including brain research to back up the claims.
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Are these uncertain times drawing us into a cycle of dogma and prejudice?

Are these uncertain times drawing us into a cycle of dogma and prejudice? | Counselling Update | Scoop.it

"...Kossowska and her colleagues tested levels of dogmatic belief, whether religious or atheist, and intolerance of uncertainty, among 201 participants. They found that an inability to cope with uncertainty (as measured with the Need for Closure scale) correlated with dogmatic belief among religious people – Christians in this cultural context – but also with dogmatic belief among atheists. The researchers said this pattern suggests that, whatever your own religious or non-religious orientation, “dogmatic beliefs offer a global worldview full or rules and explanations and thereby reduce the complexity of life and create a psychologically safe and predictable environment.”

Next, the researchers tested the religious and atheistic beliefs and intolerance of 116 more participants, but this time they also manipulated some of them to experience feelings of uncertainty (participants rated their agreement with statements about times they’d felt uncertain, under the guise of it being a personality test). The researchers also tested their prejudice towards different social groups.

As before, a dislike of uncertainty correlated with dogmatic beliefs, both religious and atheist. More dogma also correlated with greater prejudice towards out-groups and seeing them as more threatening. Moreover, dogmatic believers of both stripes showed increased prejudice when primed to experience feelings of uncertainty. For the orthodox Christian believers, this manifested in increased prejudice towards homosexual people; for the dogmatic atheists, it was increased prejudice towards pro-life supporters..."

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Iceland knows how to stop teen substance abuse but the rest of the world isn’t listening

Iceland knows how to stop teen substance abuse but the rest of the world isn’t listening | Counselling Update | Scoop.it

"...Milkman’s doctoral dissertation concluded that people would choose either heroin or amphetamines depending on how they liked to deal with stress. Heroin users wanted to numb themselves; amphetamine users wanted to actively confront it. After this work was published, he was among a group of researchers drafted by the US National Institute on Drug Abuse to answer questions such as: why do people start using drugs? Why do they continue? When do they reach a threshold to abuse? When do they stop? And when do they relapse?

“Any college kid could say: why do they start? Well, there’s availability, they’re risk-takers, alienation, maybe some depression,” he says. “But why do they continue? So I got to the question about the threshold for abuse and the lights went on – that’s when I had my version of the ‘aha’ experience: they could be on the threshold for abuse before they even took the drug, because it was their style of coping that they were abusing.”

At Metropolitan State College of Denver, Milkman was instrumental in developing the idea that people were getting addicted to changes in brain chemistry. Kids who were “active confronters” were after a rush – they’d get it by stealing hubcaps and radios and later cars, or through stimulant drugs. Alcohol also alters brain chemistry, of course. It’s a sedative but it sedates the brain’s control first, which can remove inhibitions and, in limited doses, reduce anxiety.

“People can get addicted to drink, cars, money, sex, calories, cocaine – whatever,” says Milkman. “The idea of behavioural addiction became our trademark.”

This idea spawned another: “Why not orchestrate a social movement around natural highs: around people getting high on their own brain chemistry – because it seems obvious to me that people want to change their consciousness – without the deleterious effects of drugs?”

By 1992, his team in Denver had won a $1.2 million government grant to form Project Self-Discovery, which offered teenagers natural-high alternatives to drugs and crime. They got referrals from teachers, school nurses and counsellors, taking in kids from the age of 14 who didn’t see themselves as needing treatment but who had problems with drugs or petty crime.

“We didn’t say to them, you’re coming in for treatment. We said, we’ll teach you anything you want to learn: music, dance, hip hop, art, martial arts.” The idea was that these different classes could provide a variety of alterations in the kids’ brain chemistry, and give them what they needed to cope better with life: some might crave an experience that could help reduce anxiety, others may be after a rush.

At the same time, the recruits got life-skills training, which focused on improving their thoughts about themselves and their lives, and the way they interacted with other people. “The main principle was that drug education doesn’t work because nobody pays attention to it. What is needed are the life skills to act on that information,” Milkman says. Kids were told it was a three-month programme. Some stayed five years..."

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What is the self if not that which pays attention? – Carolyn Dicey Jennings | Aeon Essays

What is the self if not that which pays attention? – Carolyn Dicey Jennings | Aeon Essays | Counselling Update | Scoop.it

"...Our behaviour is determined by the self, or our full set of interests working together, which is not determined by the individual interests or the mere sum of those individual interests. In other words, it is not just your love of udon, poetry or tiger lilies that makes you a self – it is the collection of these and other interests, all working together to guide your behaviour. 


Specifically, a collection of interests becomes a substantive self at the moment it exerts control over its component interests. The need for such control comes from constraints faced by the collection that are not faced by its components – the competition for resources that are shared across the components. The resolution of this competition is attention. So, in my view, the self comes into being with the first act of attention, or the first time attention favours one interest over another. This will occur when we have multiple interests, two or more of which are in conflict. At the very moment attention resolves such a conflict, the self is born..."

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How the Brain Controls Your Behavior

How the Brain Controls Your Behavior | Counselling Update | Scoop.it

"You have three brains—the triune, the limbic, and the cortex—and they're all fighting for dominance as you go about your life. The so-called lizard brain (the triune) is perhaps the one we tend to think of as instinctual and gives us our basic instincts like, for example, staying alive or not touching fire. The limbic brain controls our emotions like fear and desire, while our cortex gives us the knowledge that makes us human. Basically, the three brains talk to one another and vie for rank in certain situations..."

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Brain Imaging Reveals Neural Roots of Caring

Brain Imaging Reveals Neural Roots of Caring | Counselling Update | Scoop.it

"Brain activity associated with empathy was not rooted in one part of the brain, the way sensory input tends to be processed. Rather, it was spread across the brain and involved multiple brain regions. “The brain is not a modular system where there’s a region that manages empathy,” says Wager. “It’s a distributed process.” Patterns associated with empathic care, for instance, overlapped with systems in the brain associated with value and reward, such as the ventromedial prefrontal cortex and the medial orbitofrontal cortex. In contrast, patterns of empathic distress overlapped with systems in the brain known for mirroring, such as the premotor cortex and the primary and secondary somatosensory cortices, which help an individual simulate or imagine what another person is feeling or thinking."

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The Neuroscience of Attachment - Linda Graham, MFT, Resources for Recovering Resilience

The Neuroscience of Attachment - Linda Graham, MFT, Resources for Recovering Resilience | Counselling Update | Scoop.it

"The 9 functions of the pre-frontal cortex are: 


regulation of body – SNS-PNS balance 


attuned communication 


felt sense of other’s experience 


regulation of emotions 


response flexibility – pause, options, evaluate options, appropriate decision 


empathy insight – self awareness 


fear extinction – GABA fibers to amygdala 


intuition – deep knowing without logic 


morality – behaviors based on empathy. 


Research has shown that 7 of the 9 functions of the PFC are outcomes of secure attachment. Research also shows that all 9 functions are strengthened in mindfulness practice, internal attunement rather than interpersonal attunement."

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To Be More Empathetic, Pay Attention to Your Own Body

To Be More Empathetic, Pay Attention to Your Own Body | Counselling Update | Scoop.it
Interoception, or a sense of the inner workings of your body, has been linked to better decision-making skills and a more finely tuned understanding of your own emotions. And according to a study recently published in the journal Cortex and highlighted in New Scientist, the benefits extend beyond your own little bubble of one: Interoception can also make us better at understanding other people.
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Robert Sapolsky -The biology of our best and worst selves Ted Talk 2017

How can humans be so compassionate and altruistic — and also so brutal and violent? To understand why we do what we do, neuroscientist Robert Sapolsky looks at extreme context, examining actions on timescales from seconds to millions of years before they occurred. In this fascinating talk, he shares his cutting edge research into the biology that drives our worst and best behaviors.

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Destiny and DNA: Our Pliable Genome

"Our genes strictly dictate our personalities, appearance and diseases. Or do they? Research has revealed that genes can turn on and off; they can be expressed for years and then silenced. Sometimes, they are never activated. And these genetic instructions—how and when DNA is read—can be determined by the experiences of one’s ancestors, even those several generations back. Epigenetics studies these instructions, the biological markers along our DNA that regulate gene expression in response to features like age or environment, and which can influence the traits we pass onto our children. Glimpse into the future with scientists at the forefront of this emerging field as they reveal the role our genetic markers play in steering our biological destiny.

PARTICIPANTS: Frances A. Champagne, Randy L. Jirtle, Jean-Pierre Issa
Original Program Date: June 1, 2013

Bill Blakemore's Introduction. 00:06

Participant Introductions. 1:55

A brief history of Epigenetics. 3:16

What is Epigenetics? 4:30

Can your DNA be effected by the natural world? 6:05

Why do identical twins end up being different people? 9:17

The mechanics of the physical genome. 14:05

Humans wouldn't be here without variation. 18:35

Three breakthrough studies. 21:41

What is cold mother syndrome? 33:30

The measuring of Epigenetics. 41:05

What are the risks to treat neurological disorders with Epigenetics? 47:24

Is there any denial to the insights of Epigenetics? 53:44

Will we sue our genealogical past? 59:30

The eugenics movement today. 1:05:50

Will there be pills that can change our DNA? 1:10:00

Can this therapy revert metastasis process? 1:15:14

Does what extent does bacteria in the body effect metastasis?1:15:55

What is the effect of culture on Epigenetics? 1:18:49"

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The Dangers of the Good Child

The Dangers of the Good Child | Counselling Update | Scoop.it

"...Many good children are good out of love of a depressed harassed parent who makes it clear they just couldn’t cope with any more complications or difficulties. Or maybe they are very good to soothe a violently angry parent who could become catastrophically frightening at any sign of less than perfect conduct. Or perhaps the parent was very busy and distracted; only by being very good could the child  hope to gain a sliver of their interest. 


But this repression of more challenging emotions, though it produces short-term pleasant obedience, stores up a huge amount of difficulty in later life. Practiced educators and parents should spot signs of exaggerated politeness – and treat them as the danger they are. 


The good child becomes a keeper of too many secrets and an appalling communicator of unpopular but important things. They say lovely words, they are experts in satisfying the expectations of their audiences, but their real thoughts and feelings stay buried and then generate psychosomatic symptoms, twitches, sudden outbursts and sulphurous bitterness.

The sickness of the good child is that they have no experience of other people being able to tolerate their badness. They have missed out a vital privilege accorded to the healthy child; that of being able to display envious, greedy, egomaniacal sides and yet be tolerated and loved nevertheless..."

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The two kinds of stories we tell about ourselves

The two kinds of stories we tell about ourselves | Counselling Update | Scoop.it

"...One of the great contributions of psychology and psychotherapy research is the idea that we can edit, revise and interpret the stories we tell about our lives even as we are constrained by the facts. A psychotherapist’s job is to work with patients to rewrite their stories in a more positive way. Through editing and reinterpreting his story with his therapist, the patient may come to realize that he is in control of his life and that some meaning can be gleaned from his hardships. A review of the scientific literature finds that this form of therapy is as effective as antidepressants or cognitive behavioral therapy.

Even making smaller story edits can have a big impact on our lives. So found Adam Grant and Jane Dutton in a study published in 2012. The researchers asked university call-center fundraisers to keep a journal for four consecutive days. In one condition, the beneficiary condition, the researchers asked the fundraisers to write about the last time a colleague did something for them that inspired gratitude. In the second condition, the benefactor condition, the participants wrote about a time they contributed to others at work.

The researchers wanted to know which type of story would lead the research subjects to be more generous. To find out, they monitored the fundraisers’ call records. Since the fundraisers were paid a fixed hourly rate to call alumni and solicit donations, the researchers reasoned, then the number of calls they made during their shift was a good indicator of prosocial, helping behavior.

After Grant and Dutton analyzed the stories, they found that fundraisers who told a story of themselves as benefactors ultimately made 30 percent more calls to alumni after the experiment than they had before. Those who told stories about being the beneficiary of generosity showed no changes in their behavior.

Grant and Dutton’s study suggests that the ability of a story to create meaning does not end with the crafting of the tale. The stories the benefactors told about themselves ultimately led to meaningful behaviors — giving their time in the service of a larger cause. Even though the fundraisers knew they were only telling their stories as part of a study, they ultimately “lived by” those stories, as McAdams would put it. By subtly reframing their narrative, they adopted a positive identity that led them to live more purposefully."

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Early life deprivation, neurodevelopment, mental health and resilience

Early life deprivation, neurodevelopment, mental health and resilience | Counselling Update | Scoop.it

"Following the fall of Romania’s Communist dictator Nicolae Ceausescu in 1989, the world was shocked to learn of the appalling conditions in the country’s orphanages. Those of us old enough to have watched the news bulletins remember them alongside the reports of Ethiopian famine from a few years earlier, because the images of children abandoned and without hope just can’t be unseen.

Many of the Romanian orphans were adopted into UK families and this provided researchers with a unique opportunity to study the effects of this early deprivation on long-term psychosocial and physical outcomes of the adopted children. The English and Romanian Adoptee (ERA) project is a longitudinal, multi-method investigation, initially led by Michael Rutter (Rutter et al, 2007).

Yesterday The Lancet published a follow-up study of this work (Sonuga-Barke et al, 2017), which presents data from this same cohort of Romanian children but now in their young adulthood (22-25 years). We know from other research that early-life deprivation is associated with developmental and mental health disorders in childhood, but this new evidence provides new knowledge about how these effects can persist into adulthood..."

Click on the title for the full article and on the following link for the full paper: 

http://www.thelancet.com/pdfs/journals/lancet/PIIS0140-6736(17)30045-4.pdf




Dimitris Tsantaris's insight:
The research on Romanian orphans was one of the most significant in regard to emotional deprivation and its effects on mental health. Now, a follow-up study attempts to re-assess those effects - unfortunately with heartbreaking results.
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Why Mindfulness Belongs in the Classroom

Why Mindfulness Belongs in the Classroom | Counselling Update | Scoop.it

"...Research shows mindfulness shrinks the amygdala and thickens the pre-frontal cortex. According to Dr. Richie Davidson, mindfulness strengthens connectivity between areas of the brain that support attention and concentration, thus weakening the amygdala’s capacity to hijack the thinking parts of the brain.

With this understanding, it is easy to see how mindfulness and self-regulation can translate into improved academics. This is true for all kids, but especially important for our most vulnerable kids coping with multiple ACES.

There is a scarcity of large-scale research confirming mindfulness improves children’s life trajectories. However, there is a robust body of evidence about the benefits of mindfulness for adults. We hope it is only a matter of time before a large body of research about the impact of mindfulness on children becomes available.

Momentous Institute published one of two existing studies examining the impact of mindfulness practices on prekindergarten students’ self-regulation and academic performance. This study indicated that prekindergarten students who received a yearlong mindfulness curriculum showed greater improvements in their working memory and capacity to plan and organize than students in a control group. In kindergarten, those in the mindfulness group scored higher on a standardized vocabulary/literacy assessment than those in the control group.

Other research at Momentous School has shown that after three years of participating in mindfulness practices, 5th grade students’ levels of empathy predicted their scores on standardized reading and math assessments. This tells us that Faith was right when she said breathing helped her figure out her letters. Mindfulness does not just help her feel better or calm down; it increases her capacity for academic performance..."

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Alike short film

In a busy life, Copi is a father who tries to teach the right way to his son, Paste. But... what is the correct path?

Conditions of worth vs. organismic authenticity.

* "Alike" is an animated short film directed by Daniel Martínez Lara & Rafa Cano Méndez.

More information about "Alike" in alikeshort.com

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