Costa Rica, Matt Bouchard
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Costa Rica, Matt Bouchard
Costa Rica is in Central America
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Google Image Result for http://images.nationalgeographic.com/wpf/media-live/photos/000/109/cache/savegre-river_10963_600x450.jpg

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San Jose Weather Forecast and Conditions - weather.com

San Jose Weather Forecast and Conditions - weather.com | Costa Rica, Matt Bouchard | Scoop.it

It is basically always hot in Costa Rica. It is currently 64 degrees there. Its usually sunny. Sometimes it rains. Its hotter than the devil tanning in costa rica during summer.  

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WorldLeadersTV: COSTA RICAN PRESIDENT LAURA CHINCHILLA MIRANDA INTERVIEW (UNU)

There are not many famous people in Costa Rica. The president is important. She is one of the only people that is well known. People also know of a famous crocodile. The crocodile is now dead.

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Costa Rica History Timeline

In 50,000 BC Costa Rica was part of the ocean floor. Christoper Coumbus discovered Costa Rica. In 1821 Central America gained independence from Spain. In 189 the United Fruit company is founded by railway magnet Minor Keith. In 1900, the life expectancy was only 30 years.

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Costa Rica, rich volcanic soil, agricultural wonderland, banana, sugar cane, pineapple, palm oil plantations, Costa Rica cuisine, unimaginative Gallo Pinto, olla de carne, seafood exported, Ticos c...

Costa Rica is known for its fruits and vegetables. Bananas grow in almost all parts of the country. Oranges also grow in almost all parts of the country. People grow almost anything you can think of. Cabbage is a big crop in Costa Rica.

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Religion in Costa Rica - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The most recent nationwide survey of religion in Costa Rica, conducted in 2007 by the University of Costa Rica, found that 70.5 percent of the population identify themselves as Roman Catholics (with 44.9 percent practicing, 25.6 percent nonpracticing), 13.8 percent state they are Evangelical Protestants, 11.3 percent report that they do not have a religion, and 4.3 percent declare that they belong to another religion.[1]

Apart from the dominant Catholic religion, there are several other religious groups in the country.[1]Methodist, Lutheran, Episcopal, Baptist, and other Protestant groups have significant membership.[1]The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (Mormons) claim more than 35,000 members and has a temple in San Jose that served as a regional worship center for Costa Rica, Panama, Nicaragua, and Honduras.[1][2]. Although they represent less than 1 percent of the population, Jehovah's Witnesses have a strong presence on the Caribbean coast.[1] Seventh-day Adventists operate a university that attracts students from throughout the Caribbean Basin.[1] The Unification Church maintains its continental headquarters for Latin America in San Jose.[1] Non-Christian religious groups, including followers of Judaism, Islam, Taoism, Hare Krishna, Scientology, Tenrikyo, and the Bahá'í Faith, claim membership throughout the country, with the majority of worshipers residing in the Central Valley (the area of the capital).[1] While there is no general correlation between religion and ethnicity, indigenous peoples are more likely to practice animism than other religions.[1]

Article 75 of the Costa Rican Constitution states that the "Catholic, Apostolic, and Roman Religion is the official religion of the Republic".[3] That same article provides for freedom of religion, and the Government generally respects this right in practice.[1] The US government found no reports of societal abuses or discrimination based on religious belief or practice in 2007.[1]

In Costa Rica 70% of people consider themselves Roman Catholic. Eleven percent of people say they dont have a religion. Some people in Costa Rica are baptist. Some people in Costa Rica are methodist. Some people in Costa Rica are lutheran.

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Costa Rica - literacy rate

Costa Rica - literacy rate | Costa Rica, Matt Bouchard | Scoop.it

The literacy rate in Costa Rica is 97.5%. From ages 15 to 24 has the highest percentage of illiterate people. 2.5 % cant read. I dont know what else to write. I like queso.

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Laura Chinchilla - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Laura Chinchilla Miranda (born 28 March 1959; Spanish pronunciation: [ˈlawɾa tʃinˈtʃiʎa miˈɾanda]) is a Costa Rican politician and the first female President of Costa Rica. She was one of Óscar Arias Sánchez's two Vice-Presidents and his administration's Minister of Justice.[1] She was the governing PLN candidate for President in the 2010 general election, where she won with 46.76% of the vote.[2] She is the sixth woman to be elected president of a Latin American country and the first woman to become president of Costa Rica.[3] She was sworn in as president of Costa Rica on May 8, 2010.[4]

Chinchilla was born in Carmen Central, San José in 1959. Her father was Rafael Ángel Chinchilla Fallas (a former comptroller of Costa Rica)[3] and her mother was Emilce Miranda Castillo. She married Mario Alberto Madrigal Díaz on 23 January 1982 and divorced on 22 May 1985. She had a son in 1996 with José María Rico Cueto, a Spanish lawyer who also holds Canadian citizenship; Chinchilla married him on 26 March 2000.[5]

Chinchilla graduated from the University of Costa Rica and received her master's degree in public policy from Georgetown University.[6][7] Prior to entering politics, Chinchilla worked as an NGO consultant in Latin America and Africa, specializing in judicial reform and public security issues. She went on to serve in the José María Figueres Olsen administration as vice-minister for public security (1994–1996) and minister of public security (1996–1998). From 2002 to 2006, she served in the National Assembly as a deputy for the province of San José.[8]

Costa Rica's president is Laura Chinchilla. She is 53 years old. She is 6th woman to be elected president of a Latin American country. She became president on May 8th 2010. She was born in San Jose.

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Costa Rica People and Demographics

Costa Rica People and Demographics | Costa Rica, Matt Bouchard | Scoop.it

The population of Costa Rica is 4,133,884. Some people are black-afro-caribbean race. They are 1% amerindian. The white population is spanish. Afro Costa Rican people are cool.

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map-costa-rica.png (270x270 pixels)

map-costa-rica.png (270x270 pixels) | Costa Rica, Matt Bouchard | Scoop.it

Costa Rica is located in Central America. It is usually very hot there. The country could be mistaken for Costa Rico. It has a peninsula. It borders Panama and Nicaragua. It also borders agua.

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Welcome to Costa Rica - Tourism

Costa Rica has many bodies of water that people go to for vacation.There are many tropical resorts in Costa Rica. People go to Costa Rica to swim in the Caribbean Sea. Most people go on cruises that tour Costa Rica. It has great beaches.

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The Famous Costa Rica Crocodile Pocho died 11 october 2011 in Siquirres

Pocho, the "domesticated" Costa Rican crocodile that gained international attention for a weekly show he performed with owner Gilberto Sheedan, died Tuesday ...
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Christmas in Costa Rica

Christmas in Costa Rica is basically just another day. They eat tortillas. Some people do activities with there families. Other people go fishing with their families. They do not celebrate christmas.

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Economy of Costa Rica - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The economy of Costa Rica heavily depends on tourism, agriculture, and electronics exports. Poverty has been reduced over the past 15 years, and a social safety net put into place. According to the CIA World Factbook, Costa Rica's GDP per capita is US$10,900 (2009); however, there is a lack of maintenance and new investment in infrastructure, 21.3% of the people living below the poverty line and 7.8% (2009) unemployed. The Costa Rican economy grew nearly 5% in 2006 after experiencing 4 years of slow economic growth.[not in citation given][5]

Inflation rose to 22.5% in 1995, dropped to 11.1% in 1997, 12% in 1998, 11% in 1999 and 13% in 2008. Measures taken by the Central Bank have reduced inflation substantially to 4.3% in 2009, and a projected 5.8% for 2010. Curbing inflation, reducing the deficit, and improving public sector efficiency through an anti-corruption drive, remain key challenges to the government. Previous political resistance to privatization had stalled liberalization efforts. However, after the signing of CAFTA, Costa Rica is now opened to competition in its insurance and telecommunications markets.

Costa Rica's economy emerged from recession in 1997 and has shown strong aggregate growth since then. After 6.2% growth in 1997, GDP grew a substantial 8.3% in 1999, led by exports.

Costa Rica is really big on electronics. It also relies on tourism and food export. They make microprocessors. They make medical equipment. Costa Rica has textile mills.

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Costa Rican Food (Food from Costa Rica - 2010)

Costa Rican people eat alot of beans. They also eat alot of onions and peppers. Costa Rica is known for great fruits and vegetables. They eat fish and chicken. They also eat alot of rice.  

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Costa Rica Government type - Government

Costa Rica Government type - Government | Costa Rica, Matt Bouchard | Scoop.it

Costa Rica is a democratic republic. Considered a "public matter". The United States is a democratic republic. Everyone makes there own decisions. Everyone is free.

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Convert Costa Rican Colones (CRC) and United States Dollars (USD): Currency Exchange Rate Conversion Calculator

The Costa Rican money is called Colon. One dollar in America is 500 in Costa Rica. You can have 500,000 in Costa Rica and only 100 in America. Thats alot of money. I have nothing else to say.

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Costa Rica: Maps, History, Geography, Government, Culture, Facts, Guide & Travel/Holidays/Cities — Infoplease.com

Costa Rica is exactly 19,730 square miles. The country lies between Panama and Nicaragua. Its about the size of Vermont. It is a narrow pacific coastal region. First inhabited by 400,000 Indians.  

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cr.gif (1181x788 pixels)

cr.gif (1181x788 pixels) | Costa Rica, Matt Bouchard | Scoop.it

The countries flag is red white and blue. The flag has the seal of Costa Rica in the middle. The flag means alot to the country. The design was made in 1848. It was officially adopted in 1906.

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San José, Costa Rica

San José ("Saint Joseph", Spanish: San José, pronounced: [saŋ xoˈse]) is the capital of Costa Rica, head of the province of San José, and the nation's largest city. Located in the Central Valley, San José is the seat of national government, the focal point of political and economic activity, and the major transportation hub of this Central American nation. The population of San José Canton is 288,054[2], though the metropolitan area stretches beyond the canton limits and comprises a third of the country's population.

Culturally, the city can be considered almost entirely European influenced, in part because of Spanish immigration soon after Costa Rica's discovery by Christopher Columbus, and the privileged classes which generally studied in Europe during the nineteenth century and early twentieth century. This can be seen in the architecture of the city, namely theatres, museums and houses in the city centre. It is named in honor of Joseph of Nazareth.

Even though the city's centre is almost uninhabited, it is the most important working area of the country, which brings in more than a million people daily. Despite its problems, according to studies in Latin America, San José is still one of the safest and least violent cities in the region.[3] In 2006 the city was appointed Ibero-American Capital of Culture.

The capital of Costa Rica is San Jose. San Jose is the nations largest city. Costa Rica was discovered by Christopher Columbus. San Jose is the 6th most important destination in Latin America. There is 288,054 people living in San Jose.

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