Corporate Culture and OD
27.5K views | +14 today
Follow
Corporate Culture and OD
All the best articles available on-line about Organisation Development and Corporate Culture. This enables OD, HR, Change and OE practitioners to be more effective in their attempts to improve the culture of the organisations and businesses they encounter.
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Alexis Assimacopoulos from Art of Hosting
Scoop.it!

Reinventing Organizations: a case study

Reinventing Organizations: a case study | Corporate Culture and OD | Scoop.it
Frederic Laloux in Reinventing Organizations: case study of self-management, wholeness and purpose at work.

Via F. Thunus
more...
John Caswell's curator insight, November 27, 2014 8:05 AM

Evolutionary Purpose. All organizations say they have a purpose, but the real priority is often money. Organizations put their competitive advantage in a vault. But Jos de Block, Buurtzorg’s CEO, helps his competitors. He explains how Buurtzorg works and how their purpose is to help people live meaningful, autonomous lives. De Block’s goal is not his organization, but his purpose. People love to contribute to a purpose, other than their self-interest.
In the traditional organization the role of leaders is to create vision and strategy and to lead execution. The organization is an inanimate object – leaders program it. The new guys believe that organizations are living beings. The organization itself has a sense of direction that it wants to manifest. In new organizations, our role as leaders is to listen to where the organization wants to go naturally – and to align people and processes with this direction.

Ian Berry's curator insight, January 7, 2015 4:16 PM

I added this book to my top 21 list http://blog.ianberry.biz/2014/10/reinventing-organisations.html It contains great insights and case studies of many organisations leading us in the new world of work

Rescooped by Alexis Assimacopoulos from "employee engagement enhancement"
Scoop.it!

Culture Of Courage: Creating A Culture That Breeds Bravery

Culture Of Courage: Creating A Culture That Breeds Bravery | Corporate Culture and OD | Scoop.it

 

People are innately wired to avoid risk. During times of times of change and uncertainty, our risk aversion is amplified. Yet the number one way to gaining competitive edge is by creating a culture where people feel safe and emboldened to innovate and challenge the status quo thinking. The first key to creating a 'culture of courage' is leading from possibility, not probability.

 

Winston Churchill once said that courage is the first of all virtues because it is the only one that guarantees all others. Courage is also what it takes to set a bold course for yourself and your organization, engage in a courageous conversation, forge new ground, and to be decisive in uncertainty.

 


Via The Learning Factor, Jean-Philippe D'HALLUIN
more...
Marianne Naughton's curator insight, September 3, 2014 2:54 PM

Building Courage In Our Culture ...

Teresa Lucke's curator insight, September 4, 2014 6:14 PM

Courage and passion trump fear, go ahead,  step out of your comfort zone!

Bénédicte Berche's curator insight, September 14, 2014 12:26 PM

L'audace est une habitude à prendre... Voilà 5 clés pour un leadership audacieux !

Rescooped by Alexis Assimacopoulos from Bailey's Business A2 BUSS4
Scoop.it!

Total Recall: Barra's Challenge Is To Remake GM's Corporate Culture

Total Recall: Barra's Challenge Is To Remake GM's Corporate Culture | Corporate Culture and OD | Scoop.it
Philly.com Total recall: Barra's challenge is to remake GM's corporate culture (Editorial) Detroit Free Press Then outlined her plan to discover what went wrong at her company and remake a corporate culture whose shortcomings have become apparent...

Via Yvonne Bailey
more...
Yvonne Bailey's curator insight, April 2, 2014 9:23 AM

interesting article on corporate culture and the role of leadership in shaping and cahnging corporate culture.

Rescooped by Alexis Assimacopoulos from Coaching Leaders
Scoop.it!

The End of Leadership--at Least As We Know It!

The End of Leadership--at Least As We Know It! | Corporate Culture and OD | Scoop.it

America is currently facing a crisis of leadership in business and in government. Yet at the same time – participation in leadership seminars and programs has never been higher. The leadership industry, with many of  its roots in America, is now a $50 billion industry. 

 

Kellerman explains that the current state of leadership is no better understood or produced than it was 40 years ago and that followers are becoming more and more disenchanted by those who are leading them.


Though the leadership industry thrives, leadership in practice is declining in performance.


 



Via Gust MEES, David Hain
more...
Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, March 29, 2014 2:33 PM

Leadership has been changing for some time, but not uniformly. It is not readily evident in education that hierarchy is a thing of the past. What this means is that we are educating children and youth in a model that theorists think is passe. No wonder we have a crisis. Practice and theory are not separate, they are fused.

Deborah Verran's comment, March 29, 2014 6:13 PM
Leadership is not just about having ability it is all about demonstrating that ability in practice i.e. standing up & accepting both responsibility & accountability
Gust MEES's comment, March 29, 2014 6:40 PM
Hi Deborah Verran, I agree by 100%! Have a great day :)
Rescooped by Alexis Assimacopoulos from Culture Change
Scoop.it!

Understanding the Future of Work: 8 Traits of Collaborative Leadership

Understanding the Future of Work: 8 Traits of Collaborative Leadership | Corporate Culture and OD | Scoop.it

With the collaborative economy pushing businesses into the next phase of social business, executives must learn how to motivate, encourage and lead employees [and customers too] in a way that adds value to everyone involved in the collaborative work environment. Employees and customers are collaborating on products, services and content more than ever before. In preparation for the collaborative economy, consider what role do executives play in fostering a collaborative environment when employees and customers can receive what they need from each other?

 


Via jean lievens, Kevin Jones, june holley, Liz Rykert
more...
Monica Ambrosini's curator insight, December 6, 2013 1:13 PM

Despite a bit too simple it's a concise and effective snapshot..

Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, February 19, 2014 1:14 PM

Effective collaboration is about handling the tension that emerges from integrating personal and collective. It is about positive uses of power and its flow through the collective and each person.

Leadership Learning Community's curator insight, February 23, 2014 6:20 PM

Nice chart!

Rescooped by Alexis Assimacopoulos from "employee engagement enhancement"
Scoop.it!

7 Reasons Employees Don't Trust Their Leaders

7 Reasons Employees Don't Trust Their Leaders | Corporate Culture and OD | Scoop.it

As the world mourns the loss of Nelson Mandela and commemorates his greatness as a leader, we would do well to remember that one of the  many hallmarks of his leadership was trust.  The greatest leaders in the world gravitated toward Mr. Mandela because he was genuinely trustworthy and his purpose was to support peace, prosperity and unity not only in South Africa – but throughout the world. Mandela was able to lead people in ways that many find impossible to do. As he famously said, “It always seems impossible until it’s done.”

 

Unfortunately, trust is in rare supply these days.  People are having trouble trusting each other, according to an AP-GfK poll conducted in November 2013, which found that Americans are suspicious of each other in their everyday encounters.


Via The Learning Factor, Jean-Philippe D'HALLUIN
more...
Hayden Brown's curator insight, December 10, 2013 6:56 PM

Trust is the foundation on which every accomplishment is built.

Richard Lock's curator insight, December 11, 2013 4:23 AM

The quality of leadership and management has a great deal to do with low levels of employee engagement. Here are some ideas to consider that make a difference.

Rescooped by Alexis Assimacopoulos from Developing Effective, Healthy Organisations
Scoop.it!

Professor Dave Snowden or Cognitive Edge | Design thinking and complexity pt 1

Professor Dave Snowden or Cognitive Edge | Design thinking and complexity pt 1 | Corporate Culture and OD | Scoop.it
Dave Snowden discusses the differences that complexity theory makes to design thinking.

 

I started talking about the differences that complexity theory makes to design thinking some time ago - In Malmo at the XP conference as I remember it - and have now introduced that material in modified form onto day four of our accreditation programme.  I should make it clear this is early thinking and I know that people like Ann (who is with me here) are working on this as well and I am really looking forward to her new book on the subject with another good friend John Seely Brown..."


Via WorldsView Academy
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Alexis Assimacopoulos from Developing Effective, Healthy Organisations
Scoop.it!

Leadership in the Age of Complexity - From Hero to Host | Margaret Wheatley and Debbie Frieze


Via WorldsView Academy
more...
WorldsView Academy's curator insight, September 19, 2013 3:29 AM

"It is time for the heroes to go home, for us to give up those hopes and expectations that only breed dependency and passivity", indeed, it is time to realise we all have a responsibility to come up with the solutions.

Rescooped by Alexis Assimacopoulos from Developing Effective, Healthy Organisations
Scoop.it!

Video: Aiden Choles on the Frames of Mind to Nurture for Engaging with Complexity

Video: Aiden Choles on the Frames of Mind to Nurture for Engaging with Complexity | Corporate Culture and OD | Scoop.it

Aiden Choles talks to us about the mindsets needed for engaging effectively with complexity.  Aiden also touches on the Cynefin Framework, and how waiting can be a legitimate form of action.


Via WorldsView Academy
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Alexis Assimacopoulos from Supports for Leadership
Scoop.it!

NeuroLeadership in Organization Development

Contemporary research in neuroscience provides new insights into the deeply social nature of the human brain and its importance for how we get things done at w…

Via Carlos Fosca, Dean J. Fusto, Mark E. Deschaine, PhD
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Alexis Assimacopoulos from Management issues
Scoop.it!

Creating an Innovative Corporate Culture

Creating an Innovative Corporate Culture | Corporate Culture and OD | Scoop.it

http://www.bizfrontiers.com/creating-innovative-corporate-culture-boglarka-bihari/


Via Tochukwu Akunna
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Alexis Assimacopoulos from Organisation Development
Scoop.it!

Seven Things Great Employers Do (that Others Don’t)

Seven Things Great Employers Do (that Others Don’t) | Corporate Culture and OD | Scoop.it

For most people, paid work is unsettling and energy-sapping. Despite employee engagement racing up the priority list of CEOs (see, for example, The Conference Board’s CEO Challenge 2014), HBR's research into workplaces all over the world reveals a sorry state of affairs: workers who are actively disengaged outnumber their engaged colleagues by an overwhelming factor of 2:1. The good news is that there are companies out there bucking the trend, and they have discovered how.

 

Over a five-year timeframe, HBR studied 32 exemplary companies (collectively employing 600,000 people) across seven industries including hospitality, banking, manufacturing, and hospitals. At these companies, the engaged workers outnumber the actively disengaged ones by a 9:1 ratio. To understand what drives that tremendous advantage, they looked for contrasts between them and a much larger set of companies they know to be struggling to turn around bland and uninspiring workplaces.


Via The Learning Factor, David Hain
more...
The Learning Factor's curator insight, April 1, 2014 5:03 PM

A recipe for an engaged workforce.

Paulette Steele's curator insight, August 3, 2014 8:18 PM

Employee engagement is what it's about!

Rescooped by Alexis Assimacopoulos from Change Leadership Watch
Scoop.it!

Handling Complexity in Decision-Making: Avoiding The Bike Rack Effect in Meetings

Handling Complexity in Decision-Making:  Avoiding The Bike Rack Effect in Meetings | Corporate Culture and OD | Scoop.it

Why would a $100M power plant zoning approval take 3 minutes and a request to build a $10,000 bike rack for city sidewalks take hours?


It's easy to be swept up in the trivial and fun stuff, starving the big issues for the time and consideration they merit.  Cyril Northcote Parkinson, a British historian and operations researcher, penned this extreme example of decision-making in meetings in his book Parkinson's Law. Paraphrasing the Wikipedia entry, the powerplant is so expensive, the sums of money are hard to frame.

 


Via Deb Nystrom, REVELN
more...
Deb Nystrom, REVELN's curator insight, March 24, 2014 12:27 PM

This is a post useful for anyone connected to public sector meetings, or any meeting with complex topics.  I've posted this in change leadership watch for the reasons of asking you, the reader the question, have you ever helped a decision making body avoid the The Abilene Paradox, a classic management film about avoiding mismanaged agreement?

This post also illustrates the power of Parkinson's Law where board members lazily skip over the seemingly impenetrable problem in the meeting, deferring to the team managing the project. There will be implications for years of this city council meeting's decisions, and yet it is decided in three minutes.  It's astounding, assuming we haven't been excluded from a long list of previous meeting discussions.   ~ D

Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, March 24, 2014 11:58 PM

Most humans have no comprehension of $100 million, but understand $10, 000.

Tom Russell's curator insight, March 27, 2014 7:00 AM

I'm sure we can all identify with this scenario. It reminds me of a school football game when everybody is running after the ball regardless of their agreed position on the pitch. Clearly where there is passion there is engagement, so focussing on, and agreeing, clear outcomes is a key starting point if one is going to avoid everyone being kicked in the shins.

Rescooped by Alexis Assimacopoulos from Change Leadership Watch
Scoop.it!

3 Ways Leaders Maintain Their Composure in Turbulence: Mack Brown

3 Ways Leaders Maintain Their Composure in Turbulence:  Mack Brown | Corporate Culture and OD | Scoop.it

Leaders need to show more composure than ever before in the workplace in the post 2008 economy, becoming more mobile, more transient, more flexible, more innovative, and more strategic and diverse.


Excerpted from a list of 7:

1. Don’t Allow Your Emotions to Get in the Way

 

Seasoned leaders ...don’t yell or get overly animated when times get tough. These types of leaders have such emotional self-control that even their body language does not give them away.

 

4. Remain Fearless

When leaders project confidence, they instill it in others. ...

 

....Recently, Mack Brown, the former coach of the University of Texas (UT) football team, was put under a lot of pressure to resign as a result of his team underperforming in 2013. Though the University handled his forced resignation poorly – considering Mr. Brown had coached the team successfully for the past 16 years – his decisiveness the day he announced his resignation made you feel that his transition out of the job was a positive thing for the university.


Human nature will tell you that he must have been hurting inside, but his decisiveness and presence of mind made those that were watching him speak believe that the future looked bright for UT football.


 

6. Take Accountability

 

Leaders are most composed during times of crisis and change when they are fully committed to resolving the issue at hand. ...this means that you have made the decision to assume responsibility and take the required steps to problem solve before the situation gets out of hand.

 

Article by Glenn Llopis, Contributor.  Full article here.
Glenn offers the immigrant perspective how how companies can become more mobile, more transient, more flexible, more innovative, and more strategic and diverse.

 


Via Deb Nystrom, REVELN
more...
Deb Nystrom, REVELN's curator insight, January 24, 2014 11:46 AM

This is a helpful list.  Although I don't agree with all the items, it's useful for reflection in tough times.  

For example, authenticity and showing vulnerability is about honesty, and leaders do need to show this vulnerability from time to time, to be fully trusted.   Mack Brown may have shown this side to someone, yet in public, he did what was right for the school and the team.   ~ D

Rescooped by Alexis Assimacopoulos from Developing Effective, Healthy Organisations
Scoop.it!

From Scrum to Lean | Nettuts+

From Scrum to Lean | Nettuts+ | Corporate Culture and OD | Scoop.it

While Scrum's primary goal is organization and project management, Lean is more about optimizing processes in order to quickly produce quality products. It can.

 

A Little History

Lean is a set of principles defined by the Japanese automobile manufacturing industry in the 1980s. The Toyota quality engineer, John Krafcik, coined the term, while observing the processes and tools used to eliminate waste in mass automobile production. It wasn’t until 2003 that Mary and Tom Poppendieck introduced Lean as a software development process in their book, Lean Software Development: An Agile Toolkit.

 

 

Whereas Scrum is a set of rules and roles, Lean is a set of principles and concepts with a handful of tools. Both are considered Agile techniques, and they share the same ideology of delivering fast, while reducing defects and errors. I always emphasize Agile’s adaptability, but can’t ignore the fact that Scrum presents itself as a mandatory set of rules. In fact, Scrum’s religious fans would shout blasphemy for not following Scrum’s rules to the letter...


Via WorldsView Academy
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Alexis Assimacopoulos from Developing Effective, Healthy Organisations
Scoop.it!

Seven top tips for leading through uncertainty

Many leaders are currently facing the challenge of leading in conditions of uncertainty and unpredictability. Yet much leadership is predicated on the assumption of a relatively stable / foreseeable future - for which plans can be made.

Via F. Thunus, Philippe Vallat, Wise Leader™, David Hain, WorldsView Academy
more...
Philippe Vallat's curator insight, October 1, 2013 3:25 PM

In short:

- Keep Leading

- People First

- Engender hope and optimism

- Learn to Love Emergence and Discovery

- Call on the Collective Intelligence of Your Unit

- Have Many Review and Reflection Points

- Reveal Your Authenticity and Integrity

Harry Cannon's curator insight, October 3, 2013 8:42 AM

Worthwhile tips for any project manager facing uncertainty. Don't wing it though - you still need a plan as a baseline.

Djebar Hammouche's curator insight, October 6, 2013 11:38 AM

Seven top tips for leading through uncertainty 

Rescooped by Alexis Assimacopoulos from Developing Effective, Healthy Organisations
Scoop.it!

Video: Aiden Choles on the Frames of Mind to Nurture for Engaging with Complexity

Video: Aiden Choles on the Frames of Mind to Nurture for Engaging with Complexity | Corporate Culture and OD | Scoop.it

Aiden Choles talks to us about the mindsets needed for engaging effectively with complexity.  Aiden also touches on the Cynefin Framework, and how waiting can be a legitimate form of action.


Via WorldsView Academy
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Alexis Assimacopoulos from Developing Effective, Healthy Organisations
Scoop.it!

Overcoming Perplexity - Frames of Mind Required for Engaging with Complexity, by Aiden Choles

Overcoming Perplexity - Frames of Mind Required for Engaging with Complexity, by Aiden Choles | Corporate Culture and OD | Scoop.it

A curious thing happens when it comes to making decisions in contexts that are complex. Psychological mechanisms seem to pull the carpet out from under our rationality. Here’s a story to illustrate this …

 

An up and coming manager in a minerals company based in Johannesburg was offered a promotion to lead a new team at a rural mining operation. Being in a far-flung rural area, the manager had to uproot his young family from suburbia where they were fairly comfortable and established. His wife agreed and they entered the new chapter of their lives, moving to a house provided by the company on the new mine. The new house had no garden and no grass for the kids to play on so the manager’s wife set about establishing a modest garden. Just as the grass was turning green, after weeks of intense effort, the husband returned home one evening with a memo from senior management. Water usage on the operation and in the surrounding communities was too high, it said. Seeing that the company supplied water to the community and that the operation was in a water scarce region, the community had to reduce their water usage. Amongst other restrictions, watering gardens was now prohibited. This infuriated the wife, but they had no choice. They could not have a garden. They had effectively relocated to a desert, she thought. This was not the lifestyle she wanted, or had chosen.

After a short while the manager resigned due to the family pressure of the relocation and moved back to Johannesburg. After encountering similar resignation stories, the mine’s HR manager escalated the exit interview transcript to the MD because she felt it was unacceptable to lose such promising talent over what she thought was a silly water restriction. The MD was unperturbed. ‘We operate in a water scarce environment’, he said. ‘We need to save water. We cannot be distracted by wives and children who want nice green grass to play on. This is a mine after all.’

 

This story is an example of how, when faced with a complex problem, managers can slip into a reductive frame of mind and deal with the problem by splitting off the adaptive challenge from the technical problem.

 


Via WorldsView Academy
more...
No comment yet.