Corporate Culture and OD
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Corporate Culture and OD
All the best articles available on-line about Organisation Development and Corporate Culture. This enables OD, HR, Change and OE practitioners to be more effective in their attempts to improve the culture of the organisations and businesses they encounter.
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Reinventing Organizations

Reinventing Organizations | Corporate Culture and OD | Scoop.it
Based on three years of research, the book Reinventing Organizations describes the emergence of a new management paradigm, a radically more soulful, purposeful and powerful ways to structure and run businesses and non-profits, schools and hospitals.

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Making Change Personal

Making Change Personal | Corporate Culture and OD | Scoop.it
See our new blog about using transparency and Action Learning Sets to improve performance in #changemanagement http://t.co/T5WIfTiDOv

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When Change is NOT the Right Thing for Business

When Change is NOT the Right Thing for Business | Corporate Culture and OD | Scoop.it
Ask your customers what they want.

Is constant adaptation always the best policy?Do your customers really want you to change?Will change alienate your base?Will you confuse people?What is the cost?Will the change make you vulnerable?

 

The bottom line:  "Your customers will dictate when and how much to change. Keep asking them what they want (we recommend a formal or informal audit every six months) and keep watching their behavior, since they aren’t always able to articulate their desires. Then change as they do, or just a little bit faster."


Via Deb Nystrom, REVELN, Abeo Verto
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Deb Nystrom, REVELN's curator insight, April 25, 2014 10:42 AM

This change management perspective is worthy of review for any change leader or facilitator/consultant.  The 5 questions are savvy "change what" questions and highlight that change is driven by staying close to the heart and sensibilities of your customer, even if they cannot articulate what they want.  

Henry Ford said that if he'd listened to his customers, he would have built a faster horse.  However, in one sense, that is exactly what he did.  Then it was up to us to build better roads.

Systems thinking and change, once again.   ~  Deb 

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's curator insight, April 29, 2014 5:16 PM

The 5 questions are savvy "change what" questions and highlight that change is driven by staying close to the heart and sensibilities of your customer, even if they cannot articulate what they want.  

Henry Ford said that if he'd listened to his customers, he would have built a faster horse.  However, in one sense, that is exactly what he did. Then it was up to us to build better roads.

Systems thinking and change, once again.   ~  Deb 

 

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Handling Complexity in Decision-Making: Avoiding The Bike Rack Effect in Meetings

Handling Complexity in Decision-Making:  Avoiding The Bike Rack Effect in Meetings | Corporate Culture and OD | Scoop.it

Why would a $100M power plant zoning approval take 3 minutes and a request to build a $10,000 bike rack for city sidewalks take hours?


It's easy to be swept up in the trivial and fun stuff, starving the big issues for the time and consideration they merit.  Cyril Northcote Parkinson, a British historian and operations researcher, penned this extreme example of decision-making in meetings in his book Parkinson's Law. Paraphrasing the Wikipedia entry, the powerplant is so expensive, the sums of money are hard to frame.

 


Via Deb Nystrom, REVELN
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Deb Nystrom, REVELN's curator insight, March 24, 2014 12:27 PM

This is a post useful for anyone connected to public sector meetings, or any meeting with complex topics.  I've posted this in change leadership watch for the reasons of asking you, the reader the question, have you ever helped a decision making body avoid the The Abilene Paradox, a classic management film about avoiding mismanaged agreement?

This post also illustrates the power of Parkinson's Law where board members lazily skip over the seemingly impenetrable problem in the meeting, deferring to the team managing the project. There will be implications for years of this city council meeting's decisions, and yet it is decided in three minutes.  It's astounding, assuming we haven't been excluded from a long list of previous meeting discussions.   ~ D

Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, March 24, 2014 11:58 PM

Most humans have no comprehension of $100 million, but understand $10, 000.

Tom Russell's curator insight, March 27, 2014 7:00 AM

I'm sure we can all identify with this scenario. It reminds me of a school football game when everybody is running after the ball regardless of their agreed position on the pitch. Clearly where there is passion there is engagement, so focussing on, and agreeing, clear outcomes is a key starting point if one is going to avoid everyone being kicked in the shins.

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3 Ways Leaders Maintain Their Composure in Turbulence: Mack Brown

3 Ways Leaders Maintain Their Composure in Turbulence:  Mack Brown | Corporate Culture and OD | Scoop.it

Leaders need to show more composure than ever before in the workplace in the post 2008 economy, becoming more mobile, more transient, more flexible, more innovative, and more strategic and diverse.


Excerpted from a list of 7:

1. Don’t Allow Your Emotions to Get in the Way

 

Seasoned leaders ...don’t yell or get overly animated when times get tough. These types of leaders have such emotional self-control that even their body language does not give them away.

 

4. Remain Fearless

When leaders project confidence, they instill it in others. ...

 

....Recently, Mack Brown, the former coach of the University of Texas (UT) football team, was put under a lot of pressure to resign as a result of his team underperforming in 2013. Though the University handled his forced resignation poorly – considering Mr. Brown had coached the team successfully for the past 16 years – his decisiveness the day he announced his resignation made you feel that his transition out of the job was a positive thing for the university.


Human nature will tell you that he must have been hurting inside, but his decisiveness and presence of mind made those that were watching him speak believe that the future looked bright for UT football.


 

6. Take Accountability

 

Leaders are most composed during times of crisis and change when they are fully committed to resolving the issue at hand. ...this means that you have made the decision to assume responsibility and take the required steps to problem solve before the situation gets out of hand.

 

Article by Glenn Llopis, Contributor.  Full article here.
Glenn offers the immigrant perspective how how companies can become more mobile, more transient, more flexible, more innovative, and more strategic and diverse.

 


Via Deb Nystrom, REVELN
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Deb Nystrom, REVELN's curator insight, January 24, 2014 11:46 AM

This is a helpful list.  Although I don't agree with all the items, it's useful for reflection in tough times.  

For example, authenticity and showing vulnerability is about honesty, and leaders do need to show this vulnerability from time to time, to be fully trusted.   Mack Brown may have shown this side to someone, yet in public, he did what was right for the school and the team.   ~ D

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Change management and the law of identity

Change management and the law of identity | Corporate Culture and OD | Scoop.it
Identity shapes how people describe their world. The range of options that someone can identify and define their view presents little issue, until collaboration. Unfortunately, most of what we do i...

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Reinventing Organizations: a case study

Reinventing Organizations: a case study | Corporate Culture and OD | Scoop.it
Frederic Laloux in Reinventing Organizations: case study of self-management, wholeness and purpose at work.

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John Caswell's curator insight, November 27, 2014 8:05 AM

Evolutionary Purpose. All organizations say they have a purpose, but the real priority is often money. Organizations put their competitive advantage in a vault. But Jos de Block, Buurtzorg’s CEO, helps his competitors. He explains how Buurtzorg works and how their purpose is to help people live meaningful, autonomous lives. De Block’s goal is not his organization, but his purpose. People love to contribute to a purpose, other than their self-interest.
In the traditional organization the role of leaders is to create vision and strategy and to lead execution. The organization is an inanimate object – leaders program it. The new guys believe that organizations are living beings. The organization itself has a sense of direction that it wants to manifest. In new organizations, our role as leaders is to listen to where the organization wants to go naturally – and to align people and processes with this direction.

Ian Berry's curator insight, January 7, 2015 4:16 PM

I added this book to my top 21 list http://blog.ianberry.biz/2014/10/reinventing-organisations.html It contains great insights and case studies of many organisations leading us in the new world of work

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Project Management and Change Management Go Hand in Hand ~ Future of CIO

Project Management and Change Management Go Hand in Hand ~ Future of CIO | Corporate Culture and OD | Scoop.it

Statistically, both project management and change management effort have 70%+ of failure rate, it also spurs many provocative debates on how to manage projects more smoothly, such as: How do you view the disciplines of change management and project management? Complimentary, Redundant, or Conflicting?


Via David J. Williamson, MBA, PhD, PMP, ITIL-F, Abeo Verto
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David J. Williamson, MBA, PhD, PMP, ITIL-F's curator insight, April 16, 2014 7:00 AM

An excellent comparison and integration of Project Management and Change Management.

David J. Williamson, MBA, PhD, PMP, ITIL-F's curator insight, November 20, 2014 11:04 AM

An excellent comparison and integration of Project Management and Change Management.

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How to Change Things When Change is Hard

How to Change Things When Change is Hard | Corporate Culture and OD | Scoop.it

How to Change Things When Change is Hard http://t.co/mpz8NndDyc


Via Pippa Davies @PippaDavies , Luciana Viter, David Hain
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Pippa Davies @PippaDavies 's curator insight, March 28, 2014 1:02 AM
Loved this book and also the principles shared. Having traveled the journey of change I know it is not easy. But very worthwhile!
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Leading and sustaining a nimble organization: Interview with Daryl Conner, 2014

Leading and sustaining a nimble organization: Interview with Daryl Conner, 2014 | Corporate Culture and OD | Scoop.it

Excerpted, via Gail Severrini & the Change Whisperer:

The authors of the current  Innosight study, “Creative Destruction Whips through Corporate America,” offer a warning to executives: “At the current churn rate, 75% of the S&P 500 will be replaced by 2027.”

....The Innosight study also proposes three questions that the CEO and executive committee should ask themselves. I found the second question to be arresting: “How fast do we have to change to maintain our position within our industry?”


_____________________________
   

It is about creating and sustaining an organizational DNA that views change as a constant...

_____________________________

 

It is about creating and sustaining an organizational DNA that views change as a constant, as part of the daily activities of leaders, managers, and employees.
     

How are Strategy Realization Offices different than conventional Project Management Offices and how an SRO can contribute to building a nimble organization?


We built the Strategy Realization Office structure to give leaders two things: oversight on their most strategic imperatives and line of sight on benefits realization.


______________________________
   
There is always strategic change in organizations. ...We need permanent structures to manage it. ~ Daryl Conner

______________________________


    

Conventional PMOs are assembled on project funding and adjourned on installation. This kind of timing mindset does not serve leaders who need to manage continuity of business performance all the way through to full realization of the initiative’s promise.

   

There is always strategic change in organizations. It is a fact of life now. We need permanent structures to manage it.



Via Deb Nystrom, REVELN
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Deb Nystrom, REVELN's curator insight, February 21, 2014 11:31 AM

Replacing  "75% of the S&P 500 ...by 2027" is a huge pointer to what our learning is and needs to be for the months and years ahead.  ~  D

Richard Platt's curator insight, February 25, 2014 9:36 AM

I only wish that more companies understood that this Change Thing is a requisite for corporate survival and thriving,....but many are just too afraid to change the way they think about change, let alone manage and be a leader with it....Too bad the market punishes those companies that don't embrace it.

InflatableCostumes's curator insight, March 7, 2014 7:27 AM

 Manufacturers of Custom Shaped Cold Air Inflatables including Giant Character shapes and  Product Replicas also Rooftop Balloons specializing in custom inflatables for advertising, manufactured in Hyderabad city, India - http://www.inflatablecostumes.com

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Why Change Management Research Fails, Moving the Cheese Perspective

Why Change Management Research Fails, Moving the Cheese Perspective | Corporate Culture and OD | Scoop.it

"Personality gets all the headlines while context [for change]  is ignored."

 

...The challenge is that the researcher needs to define (bound) the change.  By defining the change, the researcher limits the amount of people he or she can send the survey to.  Researching a particular change, rather than change in a general sense, is not without its own set of challenges, but that is for another post.


- See more at: http://www.howtochangemanagement.com/2013/10/why-change-management-research-sucks.html#sthash.xkvnrn6g.dpuf

 

Related posts by Deb:
     

Beyond Resilience: Givers, Takers, Matchers and Anti-Fragile Systems   

          

Two Tried & True Change Models – Evergreen for Agile Change

        

Messing up a Change Implementation with Someone Else’s Learning Culture?


Via Deb Nystrom, REVELN
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Deb Nystrom, REVELN's curator insight, November 6, 2013 11:22 AM

Getting the type of change right, as well as knowing the right questions to ask, is a part of increasing the liklihood of success in planning and adjusting to change along the way.  ~  Deb