Copyright laws teachers should be aware of
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New Copyright Laws.. is there a downside? | KEL's Blog

I believe that teaching about copyright laws is an essential component of Digital Citizenship, and agree that “..students, faculty, and other users of copyrighted materials need to perceive copyright law as just and ethical,” not ...
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This article disucssess the new copyright laws passed by the Copyright Moderization Act in 2012, that provides flexability in the use of copyrighted materials for educational use. This act follows the guidelines developed by the Ad Hoc Committee of Educational Institutions and Oraganizations on Copyright Law Revision, the Author's League of America, Inc., and the Association of American Publishers, Inc. In these guidelines, there are some specific fair use exeptions regarding copyright laws for teachers. Teachers who do not follow the guidelines specified by the above mentioned organizations, face copyright infringement liability. This was the case in Marcus v. Rowley, (9th Cir, 1983), where a teacher was found guilty of copyright infringement for copying eleven of the twenty-four items in her class learning activity package, and keeping them on file for use by her students over a three year period.

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Vikki Howard's comment, March 17, 2013 3:19 PM
Great find... I would love to know what you learned about specific changes in fair use law that will affect your teaching.
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Creative Commons in our Schools

A Creative Commons presentation presented to the Learning Technologies coordinators from the Wollongong Diocese.
Rochelle Garrison's insight:

This is a slide share presentation that discusses a different type of copyright, creative commons. I had no idea there was a different type of copyright, one that provides resources that are freely accessable, and can legally be copied, modified, and reused by teachers and students. This is very important in today's classroom where information is digitalized onto the web. Creative commons gives teachers and students the proper resources to use in the classroom without having to worry about copyright infringement. This slide share describes how works liscensed as creative commons can legally be copied, performed, publically displayed, built upon, and digitally distributed. Teachers and students can use creative commons search engines to find information that can be copied and displayed legally without the fear of copyright laws. The creative commons liscense gives teachers and students greater freedom, and when using these materials they dont have to worry about copyright laws and fair use exceptions. Although the creative commons law seems fairly cut and dry, there have been instances of court cases involoving this law. In the case of GateHouse Media, Inc. v. That's Great News, where GateHouse Media sued That's Great News for distrubuting plaques with articles written by GateHouse Media to people whom the articles were written about or involved in. The reason for the suit was the fact that GateHouse Media distributed their own plaques to persons mentioned in articles they write.

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Vikki Howard's comment, March 17, 2013 3:25 PM
Perfect analysis Rochelle. You identified a relevant article and discussed the explicit principles covered --while explaining how these finding apply to educators. GateHouse is an interesting case...kind of peevish--but that is the law.
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WIPS global: US school considers copyrights of student and ...

WIPS global: US school considers copyrights of student and ... | Copyright laws teachers should be aware of | Scoop.it
It would be pictures of students, lesson plans organized by a teacher and so on. Washingtonpost.com report that school systems in the Washington region have use of copyrighted materials policies. But there are no rules in ...
Rochelle Garrison's insight:

This article is about the Prince George School, in the state of Washington, considering claiming ownership of such materials as teacher lesson plans and pictures of students by use of the copyrighted materials policy. There is plenty of opposition to this possible policy, and if it is adopted, it would be the only school with such policies in act. This article addresses the rule of "work made for hire," where the employer (school district) actually owns the copyright to the materials created by the employee (teacher). This rule was seen in the court case of Community for Creative Non-Violence v. Reid (1989), where a sculptor was hired by the CCNV to create three sculptures as part of a display. When the CCNV decided to take Reid's sculptures on tour, he filed a lawsuit stating that he owned the copyright to the sculptures. The courts determined that Reid did in fact own the copyrights to the sculptures, as he was hired as an independent contractor, and therefor the work did not fall under the "work for hire" rule.

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SAD 49 policy to clarify copyright issues for teachers - Kennebec Journal

SAD 49 policy to clarify copyright issues for teachers - Kennebec Journal | Copyright laws teachers should be aware of | Scoop.it
SAD 49 policy to clarify copyright issues for teachers Kennebec Journal For example, in distance learning, an instructor using video to teach students at remote sites essentially is sending copies of all course materials to each student, a...
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One school district is creating a policy to clarify copyright laws and help teachers recognize if they are violating copyright laws in the classroom. The proposal covers rules such as laws against editing purchased music, and rules for showing movies and/or television programs in class. The policy would help explain the idea of fair use, which allows the use of copyrighted materials in a reasonable manner without having to secure the consent of the copyright owner. There have been instances of court cases involving videotaping where there is questions as to whether the taping constitutes fair use. In the case of Encyclopedia Britannica Educational Corp. v. Crooks (W.D.N.Y. 1982), a federal district court found that the non profit educational agency was guilty of violating copyright laws by copying daytime programs from local public television stations and making those copies available for distribution to teachers.

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Vikki Howard's comment, March 17, 2013 3:23 PM
This discussion highlights the rigorous nature of copyright law. What are the "reasonable use" principles that were covered in the policy---in other words, what did you learn that will help protect you?
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Copyrights and the Sixth Grade | IP Spotlight

Copyrights and the Sixth Grade | IP Spotlight | Copyright laws teachers should be aware of | Scoop.it
Today, my challenge was even greater: teaching copyright law to my daughter's sixth grade class. The task at hand was straightforward. The class was about to launch a student newspaper and website. The teachers wanted ...
Rochelle Garrison's insight:

The author of this article is a lawyer who leads seminars on intellectual property and copyright laws. He was asked by his daughter's sixth grade teacher to come to their class and briefly explain copyright laws to the students, before they began creating a class newspaper and website. He explained to the students that just because  information is on the internet, does not mean that it is free for them to copy it onto their website or newspaper article. This article somewhat explains how copyright laws apply to works apprearing on the internet. It is important, that as teachers, we make our students aware of copyright laws regarding information on the web. One case that a teacher could use to help students understand internet copyright laws could be A&M Records v. Napster, Inc., (9th Cir. 2001). This case involved a file-sharing program used by the Napster Corporation which allowed its users to download free music files via the internet without consent of the artists who held copyrights to that music. Students today are familiar with sites that share music illegally, and sites such as iTunes where music can be purchased leagally.

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Vikki Howard's comment, March 17, 2013 3:26 PM
This is a great scoop--because of its relevance in the digital age, and because of the unique perspective of the author. Did you gain information regarding internet sources and copyright law?