Copyright Laws and Teachers
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Rescooped by Allyson Chance Alexander from Copyright compliance
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MOOCs, Distance Education, and Copyright: Two Wrong Questions ...

Copyright long has been a challenge for distance learning, and the vast scale of MOOCs escalates the importance of addressing the law in a most thoughtful and creative manner. Hundreds ... Somebody owns the copyrights.


Via Lyn Parker
Allyson Chance Alexander's insight:

I found this article to be very insightful.  I think the author raises some very valid points about copyright and distance learning issues.  As always there is potential for copyright infringement, such as the Basic Books, Inc. v. Kinko's Graphics Corp., 758 F. Supp. 1522 (S.D.N.Y. 1991).  In this case Kinko's copied excerpts from books, and sold them to college students.  They tried to claim that it was fair use, but they did not comply with the guidelines.  I think it is really important for teachers to fully understand what they are doing in regards to copyright laws.  There are so many different ways to do things over the internet.  If teachers even question whether or not their lesson includes something that may violate the copyright laws, they should try to find an alternative for the assignment.  I do think that distance learning poses a challenge for everyone involved, but it is important for teachers to follow the law. 

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Vikki Howard's comment, March 17, 2013 3:39 PM
Good point about the complexity and lack of forgiving in copyright law. The Kinko case is important--and has really changed educators' practices. I would like to know explicit principles of copyright law that you learned from this article and your text.
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Can Schools Claim Copyright Ownership of the Works of Their Teachers and Students?

Can Schools Claim Copyright Ownership of the Works of Their Teachers and Students? | Copyright Laws and Teachers | Scoop.it
Can Schools Claim #Copyright Ownership of the Works of Their Teachers and Students? http://t.co/1qyRU9BM
Allyson Chance Alexander's insight:

I feel that it is important for teacher to know and understand their rights.  Just like the Williams case in Williams v. Weisser, 78 Cal. Rptr.542 (Ct. App. 1969), the teacher does not have copyrights to works created for their employment.  In the Williams case though, Weisser tried to sell notes and outlines from Williams class.  Williams did have copyright to his lecture because it was not open to the public.  It is important for every teacher to understand where their school stands on issues like this. 

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Vikki Howard's comment, March 17, 2013 3:44 PM
Excellent--you stated the issue, you stated the legal principle as it applies to this issue, cited a relevant court case (Weisser), and finally you discussed the application of the law and the court finding and respective differential interpretation. Perfect.
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Copyright & Schools: photocopy, scan, screen or broadcast copyright resources in classrooms - simple advice for teachers

Copyright & Schools: photocopy, scan, screen or broadcast copyright resources in classrooms - simple advice for teachers | Copyright Laws and Teachers | Scoop.it
One-stop-shop with guidance for teachers copying and using books, magazines, newspapers, music, film & TV in classrooms - from the CLA, ERA, NLA, CCLI, PPL, PRS, MPLC, PVS (#Copyright & Schools - Simple Practical #Interactive #Tutorial #Guide ...
Allyson Chance Alexander's insight:

This is an amazing tool that teachers can use to determine what is acceptable and what is not acceptable under copyright laws.  This website is a tool that would help teachers determine whether or not their desire to use resources is acceptable under the "Fair Use" exceptions for teachers.  In some situations it is ok to make copies without getting the permission of the author.  In the case of Marcus v. Rowley, 695 F.2d 1171 (9th Cir. 1983) the teacher made copies from a book that did not meet the "Fair Use" guidelines.  Had the teacher had a resource such as this, maybe she would have made the right decision regarding what was ok to copy, and what was not. 

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Vikki Howard's comment, March 17, 2013 3:42 PM
This is another excellent article scoop and resource that addresses your point in the first scoop. Again, what legal principles did you learn about? For example, why did Rowley violate the Fair Use law?
Mrs Mularski's curator insight, May 20, 2013 9:12 AM

This is an AMAZING resource to tell you specifically what resoures you and your students can use legally.  Especially good for resources that you want to post on the web, etc.

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Copyright and the need to educate teachers | Creative Blogs

Copyright and the need to educate teachers | Creative Blogs | Copyright Laws and Teachers | Scoop.it
Re previous RT, teaching teachers to respect copyright: http://t.co/Z3sThdbh
Allyson Chance Alexander's insight:

I think the author raises a valid point!  I think that too often teachers see plagiarism as a minor offense, especially in younger students.  Students need to learn about plagiarism at an early age.  Teachers need to teach their students why it is important to follow copyright laws.  Teachers also need to think twice before copying those workbook pages. 

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Eric Stoverud's comment, February 13, 2013 1:43 PM
One area that teachers can get in further trouble is by claiming portions of the works in their own lesson plans that they wish to share with other teachers and districts.
Vikki Howard's comment, March 17, 2013 3:47 PM
Is plagiarism and copying workbook pages the same thing? I agree, this is an important issue--and teachers who follow the legal principles are role models!
Vikki Howard's comment, March 17, 2013 4:23 PM
Why? What trouble--or would teachers simply have no basis upon which to claim ownership?