copyright laws
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Rescooped by Charlie Dotson from Copyright laws for classroom
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Pinterest for Educators? | Edutopia

Pinterest for Educators? | Edutopia | copyright laws | Scoop.it
Pinterest provides educators with the ultimate tool to teach about copyright and Creative Commons. Some educators have decided to delete their accounts due to obvious issues with copyright. I see this as an opportunity to ...

Via Patricia Ewing
Charlie Dotson's insight:
This is interesting to me as an educator. I too have heard about pinterest and all the positives about it but have never tried it. I never thought about it when educating students about copyrights. This article relates to teachers because it talks about how we can be creative and get ideas from the board in pinterest but still cite and give credit where it is due. Instead of teachers being scared of copyrighting, they can show students how to make a citation for an image or any piece of information they use and talk about it in class. This directly relates to the principles in chapter 8 because it talks about citations and giving credit whenever something we take and use is not ours. Monster Communications, Inc. v. Turner Broadcasting Sys. Inc., 935 F. Supp. 490 (S.D. N.Y. 1996) talks about how makers of a movie biography of a Muhammad Ali boxing film used 41 seconds of a boxing clip in their biography. They makers did not get into trouble because their intent was informational and it was only a small piece of the film taken.
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Vikki Howard's comment, March 17, 2013 5:28 PM
Super timely article Charlie. You covered the importance of copyright issues in borrowing the intellectual property of others--regardless of the course. The Monster v Turner case is relevant with a nice summary of the rationale behind the ruling.
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Don't Copyright Me launches to protect US schoolkids' homework ...

Don't Copyright Me launches to protect US schoolkids' homework ... | copyright laws | Scoop.it
"For teachers, the copyright law 'works for hire' doctrine vests in employers the copyright in works created by employees as part of their employment," she told Wired.co.uk. "So lesson plans for classes taught at the school, ...
Charlie Dotson's insight:

Some kids could potentially have their work seized under the new copyright changes and would give them another reason not to do their homework. Copyright is getting out of control and potentially hurting the student because their work could get taken down at any moment. This article also talks about how students and teachers wouldnt be responsible for what they made but instead the school or school board would be. School boards everywhere should encourage copyright reform and freedom of expression. This is important to teachers because we need to watch the length and amount of articles we give to each student in class. Also, students cant be creative as they want now with fear of getting their work taken away due to the strict copyright laws. This article directly relates to the TEACH act and the fair use principle because students do not mean to use other works in a negative, cheating manner but instead a more creative, artistic manner. Students use their work in a reasonable and limited portion. Kirtsaeng v. John Wiley & Sons Inc is a court case that deals with a foreign student coming to America and buying books from his home Thailand country and selling them for a lot cheaper on Ebay.

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Vikki Howard's comment, March 17, 2013 5:39 PM
I am not sure the Kirtsaeng case is relevant, even though it involves as student, because the student's own work is not at issue. However, I do agree that copyright claims are out of hand when a school unnecessarily claims rights to students works. Clearly, students cannot be considered "work for hire" so I cannot see Prince George winning this one
Rescooped by Charlie Dotson from Copyright laws for classroom
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Kyle's Ed Tech Blog: Copyright for Teachers

Copyright for Teachers. Copyright laws are an ever-growing issue in our world today. It is especially important for teachers to follow these laws. Lessons offer numerous opportunities for teachers to violate copyright laws if they ...

Via Patricia Ewing
Charlie Dotson's insight:
This blog talks about how one can go about getting a copyright and how it will last a lifetime plus another 70 years. An interesting piece I found in this article that teachers really have to pay attention to is the "fair use" clause when talking about copyrights. Technically teachers arent supposed to use copyrighted items in class but if they can prove they used the least amount of copyrighted work necessary, they fall under the fair use category. This author believes that teachers need to spend more time talking about the importance of copyright and if they have a license to play a movie, why this is important. Again, this article talks about the "fair use" clause in the copyright law and the appropriate legal way to play copyrighted work in the classroom. This article also talks about the Copyright Act of 1976 and a bit about common law and how it protects all intellectual products before they are published. A court case that talks about fair use is the Love V. Kwitny, 772 F. Supp. 1367 (S.D.N.Y. 1989). In this case, an author published more than half of an unpublished manuscript to prove that someone was involved in the overthrow of the Iranians government. This was declared not in fair use because the work was taken and wasnt published yet. This would also be dealing with statutory law because its dealing with legislators.
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Vikki Howard's comment, March 17, 2013 5:36 PM
Since the Fair Use Law -- is a law, the referent is statutory. Further discussion of the Love case brings in common or case law. Most legal issues include case, statutory -- and ultimately constitutional law. I am glad you selected this article that explicates the nuances of Fair Use law.