Copyright Law and the Affect on Your Classroom
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Rob Reid: The $8 billion iPod | Video on TED.com

Comic author Rob Reid unveils Copyright Math (TM), a remarkable new field of study based on actual numbers from entertainment industry lawyers and lobbyists.
Ashley Johnson's insight:

A very enjoyable 5 minutes that had me snorting in the library...Rob Reid humorously tackles the controversial topic of copyright infringement due to piracy. Why is this important to teachers? Because it makes you smile and everyone should smile once a day at least! Plus it addresses some issues about the actual impact of the piracy we are teaching children not to do. Though we should probably not show them this video or we might encourage it. :)

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Ashley Johnson's comment, February 13, 2013 7:14 PM
This video references the Copyright Damages Improvement Act outlined in 17 USC § 501-513.
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Does "Fair Use" Allow Nonprofits To Reproduce News Articles on Their Websites? —

Does "Fair Use" Allow Nonprofits To Reproduce News Articles on Their Websites? — | Copyright Law and the Affect on Your Classroom | Scoop.it
The Answer May Surprise You!
Ashley Johnson's insight:

As I am thinking about the legal implications of posting news articles onto Scoop.it in the first place, I find this article which gives me some relief in knowing that I am linking the article and not posting it. Whew! However, it is important to know that this is not legal, especially for teachers planning on having a classroom webpage set up for thier students.

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Ashley Johnson's comment, February 13, 2013 7:37 PM
This article references 17 USC § 107 - Limitations on exclusive rights: Fair use. It also talks about the case 2000 U.S. Dist. LEXIS 5669 of the Los Angeles Times v. Freerepublic.com rejecting Freerepublic.com's claim that it was fair use to post full articles on their site.
Vikki Howard's comment, March 17, 2013 4:58 PM
Good point Ashley! Good reference to relevant Times court case...and Fair Use law. I would like to see more explicit detailing of principles of copyright law that would guide you in making classroom decisions for digital and other works.
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Supreme Court Hears Copyright Case on Imported Textbooks

Supreme Court Hears Copyright Case on Imported Textbooks | Copyright Law and the Affect on Your Classroom | Scoop.it
The Supreme Court heard arguments on whether owners of products made outside the United States can freely lend or sell those products.
Ashley Johnson's insight:

This is about a current case the Supreme Court is hearing referring to a Cornell University  and U of S. California student from Thailand who has his friends and relatives buy textbooks abroad and resells them for profit in the U.S. The publisher of the textbooks is suing for copyright infringement. This is an interesting case that I am curious to see the outcome of. The Justices are stuck between a rock and a hard place. If they rule to the defendant, they are advocating the actions of the student yet if they rule to the plaintiff, it opens a wave of possible litigation regarding foriegn made goods sold in the U.S. as well as U.S. goods made overseas and then sold here. Keep and eye on this one. If ruled for the plaintiff, use of certain materials in the classroom could no longer be protected under fair use.

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Ashley Johnson's comment, February 13, 2013 7:30 PM
This case focuses mainly on 17 U.S.C. § 109 and 17 U.S.C. § 602. It also references case Omega S.A. v. Costco Wholesale Corp., 541 F.3d 982 (9th Cir. 2008) where Omega sued Costco for selling their watching without permission. The Justices were split which upheld the 9th Circuit courts decision in favor of Omega by throwing out the use of first-sale doctrine as a defense.
Vikki Howard's comment, March 17, 2013 5:00 PM
Your analysis of this case is based upon foreign commerce laws more than copyright laws. What copyright law would the resale of these texts violate? Does this have implications for educators?
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Showing Movies At School: Fair Use Or Copyright Infringement: The Law Firm of Miller Canfield

Ashley Johnson's insight:

In Michigan, a law firm reminded school districts that copyrighted motion pictures shown during any other time but a specific educational setting in the classroom is violating the copyright. Movies shown for reward or during assemblies, extra time, staffing emergencies, lunch or after school programs like clubs are not covered under fair use. If the teacher is not present or nearby it could qualify as infringement. This is important to remember as a teacher, as it can be easy to forget this is not an option in some situations especially under stress such as staffing emergencies or sudden bad weather.

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Ashley Johnson's comment, February 13, 2013 7:43 PM
This article focuses on The Copyright Act, particularly 17 USC § 110, and 17 USC § 106.
Vikki Howard's comment, March 17, 2013 5:03 PM
I like that this scoop commentary provided explicit articulation of actual principles of copyright law regarding use of digital media--when it is permissible and when it is not. This is an important issue because educators can easily violate this law by using media for entertainment rather than education, groups that are too large, or shown too many times. It illustrates that copyright law is complicated.