Copyright law and affects on students and teachers
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Copyright Law for Teachers: What You Need to Know About Fair Use, Making Copies & More

An explanation of copyright law for teachers, including educational exceptions. How do I know if something is copyrighted and what can I use in my classroom? How long does a copyright last and what rights does a copyright holder have?
Eric Stoverud's insight:

It is very important for teachers to be informed about copyright laws and the fair use clause in regards to making copies.  It is crucial for teachers to understand the limitations of fair use and the consequences of violating fair use and the copyright laws that protect published works.

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Vikki Howard's comment, March 17, 2013 4:22 PM
What did you learn from the article? See instructions for this assignment.
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Great Web Tools to Detect Plagiarism in Students - Educational ...

Great Web Tools to Detect Plagiarism in Students - Educational ... | Copyright law and affects on students and teachers | Scoop.it
Today as I was having a little chat with one of my colleagues in the university she told me about a plagiarism case she recently detected in one of her students writing assignments and she asked me for some web tools that facilitate the detection...

Via Maria Robinson
Eric Stoverud's insight:

This article is important for any teacher or student to clearly understand copyright laws and plagiarism.  Plagiarism will be the most frequent problem involving copyright issues that teachers will encounter with students.  In haveing a clear understanding of copyright law, it is possible for teachers to instruct students how to correctly cite references and avoid plagiarism.

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Maria Robinson's comment, February 13, 2013 5:39 PM
This article is important to teachers because it gives the teachers tools to detect plagiarism within their classroom and their school. These tools will allow the teachers to warn the students that the teachers now have tools to detect plagiarism, so the students will stay away from doing it. The legal principle that is highlighted in this article is copyright violation. Plagiarism is the act or instance of using or closely imitating the language and thoughts of another author without authorization and the representation of that author’s work as one’s own, as by not crediting the original author (http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/plagiarism). A court case that deals with plagiarism is Napolitano v. Princeton Univ. This case deals with a student, Gabrielle Napolitano, who in her senior year at Princeton Univ., plagiarized most of her term paper in her Spanish class from a book in the library. She did cite some of her sources, but she did not cite all of them. The university delayed her bachelor’s degree and found her guilty of plagiarism. The trial court affirmed the university’s decision (Researched Regulation and Court Case).
Vikki Howard's comment, March 17, 2013 4:23 PM
Do you think teachers need to understand copyright law in order to teach their students how to cite their sources? What copyright principles apply?
Vikki Howard's comment, March 17, 2013 4:35 PM
Super commentary Will, you were explicit in explaining the legal principle of plagiarism, provided and explained relevant case to illustrate the principle.
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Copyright and the need to educate teachers | Creative Blogs

Copyright and the need to educate teachers | Creative Blogs | Copyright law and affects on students and teachers | Scoop.it
Re previous RT, teaching teachers to respect copyright: http://t.co/Z3sThdbh

Via Allyson Chance Alexander
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Eric Stoverud's comment, February 13, 2013 1:43 PM
One area that teachers can get in further trouble is by claiming portions of the works in their own lesson plans that they wish to share with other teachers and districts.
Vikki Howard's comment, March 17, 2013 3:47 PM
Is plagiarism and copying workbook pages the same thing? I agree, this is an important issue--and teachers who follow the legal principles are role models!
Vikki Howard's comment, March 17, 2013 4:23 PM
Why? What trouble--or would teachers simply have no basis upon which to claim ownership?
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The Educator’s Guide to Copyright, Fair Use, and Creative Commons | The Edublogger

The Educator’s Guide to Copyright, Fair Use, and Creative Commons | The Edublogger | Copyright law and affects on students and teachers | Scoop.it
Eric Stoverud's insight:

This is a great blog for teachers to gain crucial knowledge about fair use in copyright law.  Teachers have certain restrictions that must be taken into consideration while copying materials, and the information provided here offers examples of how teachers and students most often violate copyright law.  Not only is it important for teachers to understand the limits at which they may copy published material, but they must understand the consequences for violating copyright law and fair use.

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Vikki Howard's comment, March 17, 2013 4:25 PM
I like that you referenced specific copyright law-- to what crucial knowledge and certain restrictions do you refer? I don't disagree that understanding the law is important--but am looking for specific points of law.
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Do Now Round Up: Open Access vs. Copyright - KQED (blog)

Do Now Round Up: Open Access vs. Copyright - KQED (blog) | Copyright law and affects on students and teachers | Scoop.it
KQED (blog)
Do Now Round Up: Open Access vs. Copyright
KQED (blog)
Last week's Do Now asked students to consider whether knowledge on the Internet should be open to everyone or protected by copyright law?

Via Charlotte Figueroa
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Eric Stoverud's comment, February 13, 2013 1:40 PM
This is an interesting piece providing the opinions of students concerning open access versus copyright laws on the internet. It seems that the majority of opinions believe that the open access of media should be the common law on the internet. obviously this addresses the dilemma of easy access to information versus copyright laws and the elusive content on databases.
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Maryland proposal to claim copyright on students' work prompts backlash, legal review

Maryland proposal to claim copyright on students' work prompts backlash, legal review | Copyright law and affects on students and teachers | Scoop.it
A proposal recently floated by the Prince George's County Board of Education would give the government the copyright to anything created by teachers, students and employees before, during and after school hours.  (RT @JeffreyGuterman: Maryland proposal...
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Eric Stoverud's comment, February 13, 2013 1:31 PM
This is a very interesting case in which a Maryland proposal permits schools and school districts to claim the work of teachers' and students' work. The proposal states that it is the property of the school regardless of the amount of time spent on such works, or the material used to create such works.
Eric Stoverud's comment, February 13, 2013 1:48 PM
This is in violation of the copyright law due to its policies claiming the works of students, but it is not in violation of the law in claiming the works of teachers. It is vague, but the law is still under review to determine if it is acceptable in copyright law.
Vikki Howard's comment, March 17, 2013 4:29 PM
Good reference to explicit common law here, and its implications for the Maryland case--interesting reach by school to claim rights to students' works--I should think this is an overreach, as students certainly are not "work for hire" but are compelled to attend school.