Coordenadas
2.7K views | +0 today
Follow
Coordenadas
Divulgação dos imensos recursos existentes na Internet, óptimos no contributo para um ensino digital da disciplina de Geografia.
Curated by Carlos Gomes
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Carlos Gomes from geografia online | clip
Scoop.it!

geografia e ensino de geografia | geografismos: Julho 2012

geografia e ensino de geografia | geografismos: Julho 2012 | Coordenadas | Scoop.it

Orlando Ribeiro - Itinerâncias de um Geógrafo

 

Documentário realizado por António João Saraiva e Manuel Carvalho Gomes em 2010.

 

Quando, em 1911, Orlando Ribeiro nasceu, ninguém diria que o filho do Sr. António da Drogaria, como era conhecido na Rua da Escola Politécnica nos anos 30, estaria a fundar as bases científicas da Geografia em Portugal.

O seu livro Portugal, o Mediterrâneo e o Atlântico é reconhecido como uma das obras mais marcantes do século XX português.


Via Luís Palma de Jesus
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Carlos Gomes from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Produce Calendars: Understanding Agriculture

Produce Calendars: Understanding Agriculture | Coordenadas | Scoop.it

These three charts (Fruit, Vegetable and Herbs) are an excellent reasource for teaching about agriculture and food systems.  Many cultural festivals and  traditions revolve around the seasonal availability of crops and many modern eating trends often call for a return eating foods within their season.    


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Justin McCullough's curator insight, December 12, 2013 1:15 PM

I feel that when you do consume foods within their season of growth it tastes better. I like to believe that because they are in season, it is cheaper to buy them because they are in abundance but it don't think that is the case. Although there is the push to try to eat the foods within their seasons, it is probably not likely to happen since we live in a global economy, that urges food to be made regardless of what season they are best grown in. 

Rescooped by Carlos Gomes from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Where Farmers Live and Which Countries Don’t Have Enough

Where Farmers Live and Which Countries Don’t Have Enough | Coordenadas | Scoop.it
Read more from Slate’s special issue on the future of food. Which counties, states, and countries have the biggest stake in food and its future? Look to these three maps to find out.

 

Where do most farmers live?  Which countries feed the world?  Which states produce the highest crop value per capita?  This series of interactive maps with data at a variety of scales will allow students to explore these questions.  What to understand the spatial patterns of food production and the geographic factors behind agricultural variation?  They are ripe for the picking. 


Via Seth Dixon
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Carlos Gomes from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Learning about Water with ArcGIS Online

Learning about Water with ArcGIS Online | Coordenadas | Scoop.it
ESRI is the world leader in GIS (geographic information system) technology. This site features free GIS software, online mapping, online training, demos, data, software and service information, user scripts, and more. 

 

This learning module includes activities that analyze water (oceans, rivers, watersheds, wetlands, etc.) within an explicitly spatial context.  As the author of the module, Joseph Kerski states: "Water is a spatial subject: It easily moves among its solid, liquid, or gas phases on our planet. It flows through oceans, rivers, wetlands, glaciers, and through the hydrologic cycle at different rates.  Thus, the geographic perspective and GIS are useful to understanding water from local to global scales.  These activity use ArcGIS Online, a Web-based Geographic Information System (GIS).  No previous experience with GIS is necessary."


Via Seth Dixon
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Carlos Gomes from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

A Miniature City Built with Metal Typography

A Miniature City Built with Metal Typography | Coordenadas | Scoop.it

What a fantastic way to visually render the city!  For more by the artist Hong Seon Jang, see: http://www.hongseonjang.com/


Via Seth Dixon
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Carlos Gomes from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Water and Development

Water and Development | Coordenadas | Scoop.it

When access to clean drinking water is an issue, it creates a web of developmental problems for a community.  For a video with more information about water/development statistics, but the organization http://charitywater.org see: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BCHhwxvQqxg&feature=player_embedded


Via Seth Dixon
more...
David 's comment, May 21, 2012 11:58 PM
thank you for your awesome information
Rescooped by Carlos Gomes from ten Hagen on Social Media
Scoop.it!

The Internet of Yesterday vs. Today [Infographic]

The Internet of Yesterday vs. Today [Infographic] | Coordenadas | Scoop.it

An Infographic comparing the Internet when it first arrived to that of 2011.


Via Laurens ten Hagen
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Carlos Gomes from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Downtowns: How Did We Get Here?

Kennedy Smith is considered one of the nation's leading experts on downtowns, downtown economics, independent business development and the economic impact of urban sprawl, with a long career in downtown revitalization.

 

This video discusses the decline of the American Central Business District, the rise of shopping malls, the importance of the automobile and spatial organization of particular economic sectors.

 

Parts Two  http://vimeo.com/37041011 ; and Three  http://vimeo.com/37050944 ; continue the discussion with an emphasis on practical urban planning policies for small cities to revitalize the downtown region with some domestic and foreign examples. 


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Kenny Dominguez's curator insight, December 12, 2013 12:38 AM

I have wondered about that where these downtowns came from. I have thought of it because I am very curious to learn about downtown providence and how it became a downtown. Where did the word downtown come from? It is amazing how things are being called in this world.

Rescooped by Carlos Gomes from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Africa’s Population Surge

Africa’s Population Surge | Coordenadas | Scoop.it
At current growth rates, sub-Saharan Africa, which now makes up 12 percent of the world’s population, will account for more than a third by 2100.

 

Africa is the world's fastest growing region and consequently it is an incredibly young (demographically speaking) region.  This video show key reasons (primarily cultural and economic) for the population growth within Africa.  How does the  demographic transition model apply to Africa?


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Melissa Marie Falco-Dargitz's curator insight, November 3, 2014 12:46 PM

With declining rates of infant mortality, stable and growing maternity rates, the population of Africa is being projected to account for 33% of the world’s population. This may hold true unless we see what is happening in Europe, where increased maternal education and help with child rearing for society is leading to smaller families. So much so, that they have whole towns dying from lack of population replacement. China is seeing this as well with their “one child” program.  Unless sub-Saharan Africa starts a program heavy on education, the area will far exceed it’s ability to house and feed it’s populace.

Alex Vielman's curator insight, December 14, 2015 12:31 AM

Within the other regions discussed in class, I can start to see how much of a global issue overpopulation is to the world. Alone, sub-Saharan Africa accounts for 12% of the global population and could possible go up to 1/3 by 2100. This is in incredibly huge number despite the time giving for it to occur. African suffers some similar problems as India. The areas are so overpopulated it becomes unsafe due to sanitation, water, food, and amongst all poverty. The big problem as well is that the generations are rather young. Nigeria is Africans most populous area. The poverty in this area where the power goes off in the middle of a birth and flashlights are being used in order to help the mother give birth. This is very important to analyze that not the proper equipment is giving for these people living in this region. The positive is that more people are being aware of pre contraceptives and seeking more family planning. 

Martin Kemp's curator insight, December 17, 2015 2:56 PM

as we have seen in several articles before this is a large problem all over the world. mass population growth that the government can not keep up with will become a huge problem and lead to much more poverty. this needs to be handled carefully by individual governments and hopfully they can find a way to control this problem.

Rescooped by Carlos Gomes from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Incredible Shrinking Country

Incredible Shrinking Country | Coordenadas | Scoop.it
There are “babyloids” and relatives-for-rent in an increasingly childless Japan.

 

While many parts of the world are concerned with population growth, Japan is struggling to find ways to slow down the demographic decline.  What economic and cultural forces are leading the the changing nature of Japanese demographics?  A video that explains the changing nature of modern Japanese relationships and gender norms can be accessed here: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2012/01/30/japan-population-decline-youth-no-sex_n_1242014.html


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Kenny Dominguez's curator insight, November 20, 2013 6:30 PM


Japan in the future will have a great economy because there will be more people working than being retired collecting a monthly check. Which means they have more taxes coming in than being given out and they can use that extra money to help create better things for their society.  It also could mean they wont have so much of a deficit like the United States does.

Paige McClatchy's curator insight, December 14, 2013 5:21 PM

Japan's shrinking population poses many challenges to the state, namely a shrinking work force. While Japan is a very developed country, it still needs people to continue its growth. Perhaps the government should subsidize families with more than one child? a la reverse One Child policy. As I'm sure Japan would not welcome an influx of Han Chinese.

Jacob Crowell's curator insight, December 15, 2014 2:14 PM

In Japanese culture older generation are taken care of by their decedents. With more and more people not having children it is going at odds with long standing cultural traditions. What will happen when these people are no longer able to take care of themselves and have no one to turn to for assistance. Japan will  have to adapt and consider solutions that go against their norms regarding familial structure.

Rescooped by Carlos Gomes from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Environmentally Conscience Manufacturing

Levi Strauss & Co. believes that water is a precious resource and everyone should do their part to lead a more WaterLess lifestyle. Find out more about our w...

 

More and more companies are strategically rethinking manufacturing to be less harmful to the environment.  There are sound economic, cultural, marketing and sustainability reasons for rethinking the manufacturing process.  In the past Levi's used more than 11 gallons to produce 1 pair of jeans to get that aesthetic look just right...this video looks at the restructuring process to make these essentially 'waterless' jeans. 


Via Seth Dixon
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Carlos Gomes
Scoop.it!

International Human Development Indicators - UNDP

International Human Development Indicators - UNDP | Coordenadas | Scoop.it
The Human Development Report (HDR) was first launched in 1990 with the single goal of putting people back at the center of the development process in terms of economic debate, policy and advocacy.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Carlos Gomes from Digital Presentations in Education
Scoop.it!

PPT Search Engine

PPT Search Engine | Coordenadas | Scoop.it

Millions of free PowerPoint presentations.

PPT Search Engine helps you search powerpoint presentation all over the internet whether you need to find them for your school assignment or business presentation.


Via Baiba Svenca
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Carlos Gomes from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Is GPS Ruining Our Navigation Skills?

Is GPS Ruining Our Navigation Skills? | Coordenadas | Scoop.it
Relying on GPS devices can erode our ability to develop mental maps.

 

While GPS technology can help us in a pinch, relying primarily on a system that does not engage our navigation skills will weaken our ability to perform these functions.  While this intuitively makes sense, that the 'mental muscles' would atrophy when not used, it is a reminder that an overuse of geospatial technologies can be intellectually counterproductive.  

 

A distinction should be made between outdoor GPS usage (where the user receives data and makes navigational decisions) and vehicular GPS usage (where the computer typically will make all the decisions for you).  As long as you are a part of the decision-making process, you will be strengthening your navigationals skills.  In London cab drivers, they've discovered that their brains expand as they aquire 'the knowledge' of the city: http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/health-16086233 ;


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's comment, August 27, 2012 12:16 PM
The brain is just like a muscle and if you turn over the spatial analysis part of your brain over to a machine, you lose the ability to understand spatial relationships in you own neighborhood.
Paige T's comment, August 28, 2012 2:25 PM
GPS devices can work as an easy, quick solution once in a while. However, we are becoming very reliant on them to the point where some people are watching the GPS rather than the road. I recently drove through a town for the second time and had almost no memory of where I was going because the first time around I used a GPS to navigate my way. Maps are great because you can not only plan out your route, but you can also easily see the surrounding area.
Daniel Lindahl's curator insight, March 20, 2015 5:54 PM

This article emphasizes that in recent years people have put a heavy reliance on their GPS systems. This is not a bad thing, but it means that people hardly ever look at maps anymore. By not looking at maps, people not only limit their spatial view locally, but also their ability to understand where places are on a global scale. This limits geographic literacy. 

Rescooped by Carlos Gomes from Tools for Teachers & Learners
Scoop.it!

Socialgimme.com | Create amazing pages at lightning speed!

Socialgimme.com | Create amazing pages at lightning speed! | Coordenadas | Scoop.it

This is a handy tool for creating webpages, eZines, eNewsletters or simple blogs. Very easy to use and has good social nework integration. Create upto 5 projects for free.


Via Nik Peachey
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Carlos Gomes from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Understanding Population Pyramids

This covers what a population pyramid is, and how to analyze one. It covers the three basic shapes and how they correspond to population growth or decline.

 

Simple introduction on how to analyze population pyramids.   Update: some these slides originally came from a different presentation, which has since been revised.  You can find the revisions at: http://houstonhs.scsk12.org/~mrobinson/Mr._Robinsons_Web_Site_at_Houston_High_School/June_Presentation.html (paste in full URL)


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's comment, May 10, 2012 9:48 PM
http://houstonhs.scsk12.org/~mrobinson/Mr._Robinsons_Web_Site_at_Houston_High_School/June_Presentation.html
Is the URL for the revised presentation.
Miles Gibson's curator insight, December 18, 2014 11:15 AM

Unit 2 Population and Migration

This diagram is an 18 slide powerpoint explaining the uses of, how to analyze, and what a population pyramid shows. This is also in a childish language and is very easy to understand making it an easy thing to use and visualize. It shows how pyramids show fertility rates migration and workforce.

This diagram powerpoint relates to unit 2 because it shows population pyramids with population and migration data on them referencing to the units core concepts. This delves deep into the understanding of the uses of population diagrams overall and their effects on society's parts, It is overall a major part of unit 2.

Ross Mackay's curator insight, March 8, 12:28 AM
Different shapes and implications US focussed
Scooped by Carlos Gomes
Scoop.it!

Time-lapse map of Europe

"Fast forwarding from 1000 AD to 2005 showing Europe's shifting borders, alliances, unions, occupied land etc."

 

This is an excellent video that highlights the shifting political geography of Europe.  This is a nice connection with European history courses. 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Carlos Gomes
Scoop.it!

Why is Geo-literacy Important?

The National Geographic Society has re-branded the fight against geographic illiteracy as "geo-literacy." For decades, the society has been the major voice in the fight for U.S. federal government funding of geographic education in schools. In an editorial Daniel C. Edelson (@NatGeoEdelson on Twitter) writes, "The National Geographic Society's concern for geo-literacy comes from our mission. We see geo-literacy as providing the tools that will enable communities to protect natural and cultural resources, reduce violent conflict, and improve the quality of life worldwide. However, having a geo-literate populace is also critical for maintaining economic competitiveness, quality of life, and national security in our modern, interconnected world." As part of this re-branding, the society has just launched two great videos that I highly recommend watching, What is Geo-Literacy? and Why is Geo-Literacy Important?. Here on my site I have an article about the efforts of the National Geographic Society and others to improve geographic education.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Carlos Gomes from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

If All of Earth's Water was put into Single Sphere

If All of Earth's Water was put into Single Sphere | Coordenadas | Scoop.it
If All of Earth's Water was put into Single Sphere, from the USGS Water Science School...

 

"This picture shows the size of a sphere that would contain all of Earth's water in comparison to the size of the Earth. The blue sphere sitting on the United States, reaching from about Salt Lake City, Utah to Topeka, Kansas, has a diameter of about 860 miles (about 1,385 kilometers) , with a volume of about 332,500,000 cubic miles (1,386,000,000 cubic kilometers). The sphere includes all the water in the oceans, seas, ice caps, lakes and rivers as well as groundwater, atmospheric water, and even the water in you, your dog, and your tomato plant."

 

The sphere does not include the potential water that some scientists believe may be trapped in the mantle (and thus not accessible on the surface).  For more about water that is not on or near the surface, see: http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2002/03/0307_0307_waterworld.html


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Gary Robertson's comment, May 7, 2012 9:36 PM
Water is also tied up in hydrated minerals in the rocks of the earth's crust. While not "free" it is still significant and is occasionally freed through subduction and volcanic activity. Furthermore, the earth's mantle may contain even more water than the rest combined! So, maybe the Single Sphere should be larger by more than the cube root of 2, or about 1,083 miles in diameter. See mantle water data at http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2002/03/0307_0307_waterworld.html
Seth Dixon's comment, May 7, 2012 11:08 PM
Thanks Green Uncle Mary! I mean Mean Uncle Gary!
Rescooped by Carlos Gomes from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Living in the New Metropolis

Living in the New Metropolis | Coordenadas | Scoop.it
Documenting the megacities of our time....

 

Over half of humanity is living in cities and that statistic is likey to reach 70% by 2050.  Studying the urban environment, especially the 'megacities' (cities with populations over 10 million people) which are growing especially fast.  This photo gallery of the worlds 23 megacites employs long exposure images, with highlights the movements and dynamism of the urban networks.  To see the gallery and this stunning image of Jakarta's rush hour traffic, visit: http://www.nytimes.com/slideshow/2012/05/06/sunday-review/06METROPOLIS.html?ref=sunday#4   


Via Seth Dixon
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Carlos Gomes from Digital Presentations in Education
Scoop.it!

Oomfo - create stunning charts for your Powerpoint® presentation

Oomfo - create stunning charts for your Powerpoint® presentation | Coordenadas | Scoop.it

Oomfo Charts for Microsoft PowerPoint helps you add great-looking animated & interactive charts for your presentations.

Interactive, animated, easy and free!


Via Baiba Svenca
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Carlos Gomes from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Welcome to the Anthropocene

A 3-minute journey through the last 250 years of our history, from the start of the Industrial Revolution to the Rio+20 Summit. The film charts the growth of...

 

This video is a great primer for discussing human and environmental interactions as related to industrialization, globalization and climate change. 


Via Seth Dixon
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Carlos Gomes from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Scale of the Universe

Scale of the Universe | Coordenadas | Scoop.it
Everything in the known universe, created by 14-year-old twins.

 

After you follow the link, click "Start," and then use the slider across the bottom, or the wheel on your mouse, to zoom in -- and in and in and in... or out and out and out... It will take you from the very smallest features postulated by scientists (the strings in string theory) to the very largest (the observable universe).  This really is a fabulous visual demonstration of scale at micro and macro levels.   This is an excellent way to bring spatial thinking into the math curriculum as well.  See this on the twins website at: http://htwins.net/scale2/


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Kalin B.'s comment, September 13, 2012 8:11 PM
I've seen this around, and it always reminds me of a fictional pair of glasses that would show you what little a part of the universe you are, causing you to go insane.

Erm, anyway.. Very neat.
Zakkary Catera's comment, September 13, 2013 12:55 AM
I like to sit and think about how big we think we are, not as just one countrh but as one planet! We think that we are so so big but looking at this scale of the universe it is interesting to see how much bigger things can get AND how small they can get compared to us. So if you think about it this way, we are SO tiny compared to the rest of the universe and if we stopped doing what we are doing now (i.e wars, sickness and natural resources etc.) and work together we would be SO MUCH bigger and as a result of that we would be able to explore more of our world and universe
Zakkary Catera's comment, September 13, 2013 12:55 AM
I like to sit and think about how big we think we are, not as just one countrh but as one planet! We think that we are so so big but looking at this scale of the universe it is interesting to see how much bigger things can get AND how small they can get compared to us. So if you think about it this way, we are SO tiny compared to the rest of the universe and if we stopped doing what we are doing now (i.e wars, sickness and natural resources etc.) and work together we would be SO MUCH bigger and as a result of that we would be able to explore more of our world and universe
Rescooped by Carlos Gomes from iPads, MakerEd and More in Education
Scoop.it!

103 Interesting Ways to use an iPad in the Classroom

103 Interesting Ways to use an iPad in the Classroom | Coordenadas | Scoop.it

This resource from Tom Barrett et al keeps on growing and getting richer over time. If you haven't seen it before it's definitely worth a look!  - JE


Via John Evans
more...
No comment yet.