Cooperation in social dilemmas
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US, Indonesia committed to increasing carbon trade cooperation (Antara News )

The United States is committed to increasing bilateral cooperation in carbon trade with Indonesia.

The commitment was revealed in a meeting between Indonesian Forestry Minister Zulkifli Hasan and US Assistant Secretary of State for Oceans and International and Scientific Affairs Kerri-Ann Jones at the former`s office here on Monday.

In the meeting Zulkifli Hasan said that the Indonesian people had begun losing their confidence in international cooperation in carbon trade. 

"She (Kerri-Ann Jones) said it was indeed not easy to unite international countries. Therefore the US has expressed its commitment to increasing the cooperation," the minister said after the meeting.

The cooperation program would be immediately formulated but it would not be in the form of aid but partnership cooperation through USAID and others, he said.


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Expert slams Congress over ban on U.S.-China space cooperation

Expert slams Congress over ban on U.S.-China space cooperation | Cooperation in social dilemmas | Scoop.it
Washington (UPI) Jun 11, 2013 -
A U.S. expert says the U.S. Congress should adopt a more constructive set of policies that encourages rather than bans U.S.-Chinese collaboration in space.
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Introduction to Social Dilemmas

Introduction to Social Dilemmas | Cooperation in social dilemmas | Scoop.it
This is the focus for Week 3 in Howard Rheingold’s course – Towards a Literacy of Cooperation We have been introduced to social dilemmas principally through the excellent work of Peter Kollock, who...

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Evolutionary Dynamics of Strategic Behavior in a Collective-Risk Dilemma

Evolutionary Dynamics of Strategic Behavior in a Collective-Risk Dilemma | Cooperation in social dilemmas | Scoop.it

A collective-risk social dilemma arises when a group must cooperate to reach a common target in order to avoid the risk of collective loss while each individual is tempted to free-ride on the contributions of others. In contrast to the prisoners' dilemma or public goods games, the collective-risk dilemma encompasses the risk that all individuals lose everything. These characteristics have potential relevance for dangerous climate change and other risky social dilemmas. Cooperation is costly to the individual and it only benefits all individuals if the common target is reached.

 

An individual thus invests without guarantee that the investment is worthwhile for anyone. If there are several subsequent stages of investment, it is not clear when individuals should contribute. For example, they could invest early, thereby signaling their willingness to cooperate in the future, constantly invest their fair share, or wait and compensate missing contributions. To investigate the strategic behavior in such situations, we have simulated the evolutionary dynamics of such collective-risk dilemmas in a finite population. Contributions depend individually on the stage of the game and on the sum of contributions made so far. Every individual takes part in many games and successful behaviors spread in the population. It turns out that constant contributors, such as constant fair sharers, quickly lose out against those who initially do not contribute, but compensate this in later stages of the game. In particular for high risks, such late contributors are favored.


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Spontaneous giving and calculated greed

Spontaneous giving and calculated greed | Cooperation in social dilemmas | Scoop.it

Economic games are used to investigate the cognitive mechanisms underlying cooperative behaviour, and show that intuition supports cooperation in social dilemmas, whereas reflection can undermine these cooperative impulses.

 

Spontaneous giving and calculated greed
David G. Rand, Joshua D. Greene & Martin A. Nowak

Nature 489, 427–430 (20 September 2012) http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/nature11467


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US-Tajik Nonproliferation Cooperation - US Department of State (press release)

US-Tajik Nonproliferation Cooperation - US Department of State (press release) | Cooperation in social dilemmas | Scoop.it
US-Tajik Nonproliferation Cooperation US Department of State (press release) The Nunn-Lugar Cooperative Threat Reduction (CTR) program has advanced the United States' and Russia's mutual interest in preventing the spread of weapons of mass...
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New Study Rebuts Increase in Willingness to Cooperate from Intuitive Thinking - Science Daily (press release)

New Study Rebuts Increase in Willingness to Cooperate from Intuitive Thinking - Science Daily (press release) | Cooperation in social dilemmas | Scoop.it
New Study Rebuts Increase in Willingness to Cooperate from Intuitive Thinking
Science Daily (press release)
The first study drew the conclusion that people cooperate more if they are forced to make decisions when pressed for time.
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Rationality in Markets Is Cognitively Unnatural - Scientific American (blog)

Rationality in Markets Is Cognitively Unnatural - Scientific American (blog) | Cooperation in social dilemmas | Scoop.it
Rationality in Markets Is Cognitively Unnatural
Scientific American (blog)
Since before we were human, the logic of our survival has been social and relational. It was maladaptive to ignore the impact of our actions ...
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Interesante este artículo. 

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Contagion of Cooperation in Static and Fluid Social Networks

Contagion of Cooperation in Static and Fluid Social Networks | Cooperation in social dilemmas | Scoop.it

Cooperation is essential for successful human societies. Thus, understanding how cooperative and selfish behaviors spread from person to person is a topic of theoretical and practical importance. Previous laboratory experiments provide clear evidence of social contagion in the domain of cooperation, both in fixed networks and in randomly shuffled networks, but leave open the possibility of asymmetries in the spread of cooperative and selfish behaviors. Additionally, many real human interaction structures are dynamic: we often have control over whom we interact with. Dynamic networks may differ importantly in the goals and strategic considerations they promote, and thus the question of how cooperative and selfish behaviors spread in dynamic networks remains open. Here, we address these questions with data from a social dilemma laboratory experiment. We measure the contagion of both cooperative and selfish behavior over time across three different network structures that vary in the extent to which they afford individuals control over their network ties. We find that in relatively fixed networks, both cooperative and selfish behaviors are contagious. In contrast, in more dynamic networks, selfish behavior is contagious, but cooperative behavior is not: subjects are fairly likely to switch to cooperation regardless of the behavior of their neighbors. We hypothesize that this insensitivity to the behavior of neighbors in dynamic networks is the result of subjects’ desire to attract new cooperative partners: even if many of one’s current neighbors are defectors, it may still make sense to switch to cooperation. We further hypothesize that selfishness remains contagious in dynamic networks because of the well-documented willingness of cooperators to retaliate against selfishness, even when doing so is costly. These results shed light on the contagion of cooperative behavior in fixed and fluid networks, and have implications for influence-based interventions aiming at increasing cooperative behavior.

 

Jordan JJ, Rand DG, Arbesman S, Fowler JH, Christakis NA (2013) Contagion of Cooperation in Static and Fluid Social Networks. PLoS ONE 8(6): e66199. http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0066199


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the new domain hasing and domain selection is always help in good domain rankinh.

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Living in a digital world

Living in a digital world | Cooperation in social dilemmas | Scoop.it

Today’s adolescents have grown up in a world revolving around digital technology.


According to the Pew Research Center, 95 percent of American teens use the Internet. Even if teens are not on a digital device, they are surrounded by images, links, and references related to staying connected and being in the “know” through the Internet, cell phones, and other devices.


Young people of this generation have been labeled digital natives because of their heavy reliance and use of the Internet and digital technology. Many of the Internet sites adolescents visit are related to social media and the ability to communicate with others. Many teens stay connected to each other through texts, Twitter, Facebook, Instagram, Tumblr, and other social media platforms, and their digital use has become a natural extension of their lives. The ability to “control” their social world, express themselves, and connect with others, fulfills developmental needs adolescents have at this time in their lives.


It is difficult to find research proving whether connectedness through digital means has a positive or negative effect on teens’ lives. As a practicing school counselor, I have experienced the growing phenomenon of digital technology in students’ lives. Almost daily, students arrive at my door with negative issues related to texts, Twitter, or Facebook. The impact these experiences have on their lives can be disruptive, harmful, and long lasting. It is a challenge to help teens work through the hurtful messages other students send to them, knowing it would never have been said in person. I can’t help but wonder if some teens aren’t “hiding" behind their devices.


Nevertheless, not all experiences are negative. Some students report feelings of acceptance from online friends and a sense of belonging they have not encountered previously. Adolescents are able to communicate with others all over the world, learn new perspectives, and find peers who accept them for who they are. Many teens have expressed great satisfaction in the support they have received via friends and acquaintances, old and new, over the Internet. Many feel they would not have made it through difficult life situations without this support.


Living a life immersed in technology has become part of the culture for digital natives and one unfamiliar to many parents and educators. Therefore, many adults are ill equipped to handle complexities that may arise.


But this does not mean adults cannot step up and help. There are many resources available to them through a quick search on—you guessed it, the Internet. Counselors can also help by staying current on issues related to online safety and answer questions coming in from parents and students. Summer may be an especially important time to be aware of teens’ use of social media as they are spending more free time on their devices and wanting to stay connected to their peers.


Below, I’ve listed a few simple tips adults can use:


Become familiar with social media sites, understand privacy and security measures—know the “language” of the sites, for example: how to “block” someone on Facebook.

If you have a child who uses these sites, check their pages for activity, and who they are interacting with.

Have discussions with your child and/or students about online safety, appropriate disclosure of private information, engaging in chats with unknown individuals, and more.


Pew Internet Research is an organization devoted to researching the impact of the Internet on American life. Here is a link to a report on Internet use in teens: www.pewinternet.org/Reports/2012/Teens-and-Privacy.aspx .


There are risks to interacting with strangers you do not know or have never met face to face. Teens are sharing more than words over instant messaging—they are sharing photos, links, music, and videos. Teens use these platforms to express who they are, communicate their ideas, and share their experiences. Regardless of what adults think (or desire), experts believe digital natives will continue to share personal information online even as they get older.


In my experience, most young people are not willing to give up their digital devices, regardless of the negative experiences they sometimes encounter. Therefore, adults need to work on finding ways to help teens navigate the social dilemmas of a digital world.


Laura Gallo has been a school counselor at Linn-Mar High School in Marion, Iowa, for the past eight years. She is also a graduate student in the University of Iowa College of Education pursuing her doctorate in Counselor Education and Supervision.

 

Source: http://now.uiowa.edu/2013/05/living-digital-world

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Individual memory and the emergence of cooperation

Individual memory and the emergence of cooperation | Cooperation in social dilemmas | Scoop.it

The social brain hypothesis states that selection pressures associated with complex social relationships have driven the evolution of sophisticated cognitive processes in primates. We investigated how the size of cooperative primate communities depends on the memory of each of its members and on the pressure exerted by natural selection. To this end we devised an evolutionary game theoretical model in which social interactions are modelled in terms of a repeated Prisoner's Dilemma played by individuals who may exhibit a different memory capacity. Here, memory is greatly simplified and mapped onto a single parameter m describing the number of conspecifics whose previous action each individual can remember. We show that increasing m enables cooperation to emerge and be maintained in groups of increasing sizes. Furthermore, harsher social dilemmas lead to the need for a higher m in order to ensure high levels of cooperation. Finally, we show how the interplay between the dilemma individuals face and their memory capacity m allows us to define a critical group size below which cooperation may thrive, and how this value depends sensitively on the strength of natural selection.

Individual memory and the emergence of cooperation
João Moreira, Jeromos Vukov, Cláudia Sousa, Francisco C. Santos, André F. d'Almeida, Marta D. Santos, Jorge M. Pacheco
Animal Behaviour
Available online 4 December 2012
In Press, Corrected Proof
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.anbehav.2012.10.030


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Lack of guidelines create ethical dilemmas in social network-based research

Lack of guidelines create ethical dilemmas in social network-based research | Cooperation in social dilemmas | Scoop.it
With millions of adolescent users, social network sites (SNSs) are a rich data source for academic research studies.

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European Patent Network gathered in Iceland to foster cooperation ...

The EPO, the member states of the European Patent Organisation and the OHIM in its observer capacity met in Reykjavik on 11/12 June to discuss how to bring co-operation forward in order to improve the quality and ...
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NATO and Colombia Sign Cooperation Agreement - Prensa Latina

NATO and Colombia Sign Cooperation Agreement - Prensa Latina | Cooperation in social dilemmas | Scoop.it
NATO and Colombia Sign Cooperation Agreement Prensa Latina NATO and Colombia Sign Cooperation Agreement 25 de junio de 2013, 14:02Brussels, Jun 25 (Prensa Latina) The North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) and Colombia sign here today an...
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